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metal leper

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About metal leper

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  1. metal leper

    Dependencies

    Quote:Original post by Kylotan And is it possible (or practical) to move to apt from an rpm-based system? Debian's always looked a bit too hardcore for me. ;) Thanks for the apt overview though. apt4rpm is probably what you're after (http://apt4rpm.sourceforge.net/) Or, to get apt without installing debian, you could always install ubuntu/mepis/xandros/knoppix/etc, which in theory give you user friendlyness and apt together. That requires a reinstall though, so probably not what your after.
  2. metal leper

    Ubuntu Linux

    Quote:Original post by Anonymous Poster Quote:It didn't work properly on my laptop - I was left with a big cross in the middle of my screen when running X (I'm sure a lot of you know the cross I mean, you've probably seen it when X is first loading, before it turns into what your mouse cursor looks like), and after using it for a few minutes my my would always stop working. I've never had this problem with any other distro, but didn't spend any time trying to fix it (the X config file looked ok though) since I never really intended to use it full time, I just installed it to see what it was like. This link may be of some use to you: http://www.ubuntulinux.org/support/documentation/faq/hwcursor Thats looks like exactly the problem that I had, so if I ever run into it again I'll know where to look :)
  3. metal leper

    Ubuntu Linux

    It didn't work properly on my laptop - I was left with a big cross in the middle of my screen when running X (I'm sure a lot of you know the cross I mean, you've probably seen it when X is first loading, before it turns into what your mouse cursor looks like), and after using it for a few minutes my my would always stop working. I've never had this problem with any other distro, but didn't spend any time trying to fix it (the X config file looked ok though) since I never really intended to use it full time, I just installed it to see what it was like. Other than that I was impressed though, and I've not heard of anyone else having problems with it, other than one person not being able to get their sound working
  4. metal leper

    Dependencies

    Quote:Original post by Kylotan Quote:Original post by metal leper And you can't compare win98 to a version of mandrake released in 2004/2005 or whenever*. Compare a linux install from 98 to your win98 installation. Why can't I make that comparison? I wanted about the same types and quantities of programs installed, to run on the same hardware. I don't mind the cd coming with loads of stuff, but I do object to not being able to remove most of it due to the tangled dependency trees. I expect some code bloat over time, maybe 2x or 5x, but not 15x. My point was that winXP is also "bloated" in comparison to win98, but if you install a linux distro that was released in 98, it should be of a comparable size to win98.
  5. metal leper

    Dependencies

    Quote:Original post by Kylotan Debian does seem to handle it well from what I've heard. But I wish other people would stop suggesting that a manager that simply downloads and installs everything you need is the answer. I don't want to try and install a 2MB program and have it suck 100MB of libraries across the net, to be installed on my system automatically just for this one app. If I then remove that app, do the libraries remain? On Mandrake at least, they do. You end up with your system getting clogged up with libraries you don't use, or rarely use, when the application you were testing is long gone. I'm guessing this is a large part of why my 'minimal' Mandrake install is 15x as large as my Win98 SE install. IIRC debian will uninstall packages that got installed as deps of of something else and are no longer needed automatically, but maybe not... Gentoo doesn't do this automatically, but an "emerge depclean" will do it And you can't compare win98 to a version of mandrake released in 2004/2005 or whenever*. Compare a linux install from 98 to your win98 installation. I can easily get linux to take up much less space than windows XP does, and I'm sure when Windows Longhorn comes out it will use up at least as much if not more space than a linux distribution released at about the same time (and that's not any sort of anti-windows/linux is great comment, in case anyone was going to bother getting annoyed) *ok, so you can compare them, but that doesn't mean you should ;)
  6. metal leper

    Dependencies

    I forgot Mandrake - KDE is the default for that (and for Yoper (quite high on the distrowatch rankings (for what they are worth), as is Mepis) and Kanotix (allegedly "knoppix but better")), and I've always been under the impression that KDE is more popular than gnome. As for the future of KDE in Suse, only time will tell I guess, but if Novell Desktop Linux and Suse remain as separate projects, there's no reason why they should both use the same DE (you could even argue that it makes sense for them not to) Either way this is quite off topic, and fluxbox is better than both ;) I've never had much of a problem with dependencies, having spent 90% of my time as a linux user using Debian and Gentoo (though I had some problems with Debian - like when it wanted to remove all the KDE packages just to let me install anjuta)
  7. metal leper

    Dependencies

    Quote:Original post by C-Junkie Quote:Original post by Doc This is both a disadvantage and an advantage. Since there are so many options you can almost always find the right one for you. The problem is that the right one for you is always going to be anywhere from slightly to enormously different to what is the right one for any other person.Yeah, but they slowly come around to an actual solution. For example, let's take a look at the major players in distro land today. Novell, Red hat, and debian[-based] distros. These three are the big ones. Take note, for example, that all three either tend to, or outright embrace Gnome as the desktop of choice. All three attempt to support that whole LSB thing (marginal though it may be for now). Not to say that there aren't disagreements. Java vs C# vs "OMG Java is nonfree and mono won't build on s/390!" (Debian does deserve a few good digs, but at least repos with java and mono in them are a very short sources.list addition away...) But on a lot of the core issues, things are getting more unified than it might seem. Suse's default desktop is still KDE, as is knoppix's and mepis. I didn't realise that debian had any sort of default desktop or even encouraged one though...
  8. metal leper

    Bootable CD w/ NTFS write support

    http://www.jankratochvil.net/project/captive/ ^^ captive ntfs - it's not the same as what's in the kernel. According to a recent "linux magazine" article (it's issue 49+, can't remember exactly which one) both this and a similar commerical project mean you can now safely write to ntfs using linux.
  9. metal leper

    Bootable CD w/ NTFS write support

    Quote:Original post by Wicked Wesley As far as I know, the current kernel doesn't support real writing, only writing over existing files. But..... you can also reformat the drive as FAT32 and copy everything to it. (Just back it up first) Maybe there is an utilty floating around which can convert NTFS to FAT32? Or just write windows over the existing windows. Just my 2 cents, Wesley As the previous poster said captive ntfs should be safe to use to write to ntfs, and is included with knoppix and kanotix I think
  10. metal leper

    linux/UNIX concepts

    Quote:Original post by Miserable For more information on packages installed on a Gentoo system, see qpkg. You might find the output of qpkg -I interesting. Yeh that's a much better way (faster and potentially more reliable)
  11. metal leper

    To Perl or Not to Perl

    Quote:Original post by Oluseyi Don't learn Perl. The entire language is being redesigned, which is proof that they've finally conceded that they got it wrong the first time. The delay in actually releasing Perl 6 suggests that they're getting it wrong again. C# and .NET are powerful, and hold the promise of portability, but it isn't fully realized yet. In the interim, I recommend Python as well. Best of all, there are two Python for .NET implementations in the works, one of which is being authored by the creator of Jython (Python running on the Java VM), who now works at Microsoft on the CLR team. In other words, learning Python lets you get to work right now and move to .NET in the future. The fact that it's taking them to long to release Perl 6 is because Larry Wall has a family to feed and no longer gets paid for working on Perl (according to an interview with Damian Conway in Linux Format), and a lot of the other people working on it are in the same position. A lot of people disagree with you about perl, I'm not going to bother arguing either way though because it's not worth it. Perl probably isn't something that's useful when it comes to game programming though.
  12. metal leper

    linux/UNIX concepts

    Quote:Original post by andrewk3652 gentoo in my opinion isn't strong because of its package handling. If you ask me, the package handling is weak in many respects - I've been using gentoo for months, and still don't know how to get a listing of what packages I have installed (aside from grabbing it out of the emerge log). You can see what packages are installed because you specifically asked for them by looking in /var/lib/portage/world, and you can find out what packages you have installed by doing emerge -e world (there are other ways, but I just got up and that way takes much less thought)
  13. metal leper

    What's the problem with Linux?

    Quote:Original post by etothex FC2 did have such a nasty bug that's long been fixed. Not really - it messed up your partition table, but that in itself didn't damage your drive (repartitioning with some programs after this could screw things up, but nothing permanent)
  14. metal leper

    SuSE or Novell?

    A few comments: Suse personal edition doesn't come with any development tools, only the professional edition (iirc the personal edition doesn't even come with a dhcp client, which forces a lot of people into getting the professional edition) (<-unless any of this has changed since 9.0) Consider that YaST wasn't open source, and didn't become open source until after Novell bought Suse, so I don't think there's too much to worry about there When I used suse I felt that they really really didn't want me to use gnome anyway, and it never quite worked right (though the ximian (also owned by novell) was quite nice), so if gnome support gets dropped from suse that's no big deal, especially when novell linux uses it
  15. metal leper

    The Big Giant Linux XP

    1) Its GUIs (GNOME, KDE, ...) are very very slow 2) Flickering too much 3) Many many many useless free programs 4) No professional software (like Lightwave, Adobe, Macromedia, 3DS, ...) 5) No drivers 6) No Games 7) No support 8) Not fast Wrong wrong wrong. Gnome and kde are slow, but when windows xp was released, they were no slower than the windows gui is (probably faster), and I'm fairly sure that when longhorn gets released it'll be slower Many many many useless free programs (though they are no doubt useful to other people), but many many many useful free programs too I have a CD with over 500 free linux games, and there are some commerical games available, but it's a chicken and egg problem No drivers/no support/not fast - don't even justify a response
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