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MonkeyInBlack

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  1. Thanks for your reply, Kryzon. While I can pay something for thesse assets I'm affraid that commisioning someone specifically to do this would be outside my budget (especially considering the amount of images I need). I'm more looking for existing art I can get a license for. There are plenty of 3D models and sprites that can be bought but the market for what I want seems to be much more narrow. Perhaps it is a bit too specific but I'm hoping someone knows an obscure set of images (or perhaps someone can sell old assets they have from another project)
  2. I'm looking for a collection of character portraits for a game i'm working on. Something in the steam punk genre but I'm flexible. Generally just bad ass semi-realistic images of soldiers or assasins or mercenaries. Every once in a while I can find one but the problem is, I want hundreds... Are there any collections (paid or not) that you guys have come across that I may not have?   Thanks!
  3. Quote:Original post by SteveDeFacto Any idea how I can convey the same message but in less text? Do I just need to skip the whole part about how it works? A great example of minimalistic design for an introduction page can be found on the sign-in pages for GMail or Google Apps. Just a couple of short bullet points (with small images that are easy on they eye) and you get what the site is all about. You can bring across your message (and further explain somewhere else) with just a couple of points like so: Quote:Unbound Games is a collaborative community which allows game developers from around the world to work together * Have everyone chip in on a public project or control your game from start to finish with a private project. * Develop your game with the Unbound Game Engine * Sell your game through our store and share in the revenue Then you still have some place to highlight 3 or 4 projects that are doing well below without cluttering the design. Your introduction page is about getting people to click through to the rest of your site - keep it short and sweet. Anything important you can put where the action happens.
  4. I made mine without 'registering' beforehand (I didn't think I'd make it at 2am) but I finished my game! Can I still enter? Where should I send my submission? EDIT: okay, just uploaded it to here. Tested on Win7 .Net 3.5 EDIT2: for the record - i did use someone else's free-to-use graphics (credit given). Hope that's okay. [Edited by - MonkeyInBlack on April 11, 2010 5:40:46 AM]
  5. My favourtie Simpsons quote: "Alcohol! The cause of, and solution to, all of life's problems." (Homer Simpson) But there's so many great ones to choose from.
  6. Quote:Original post by LessBread It seems to me that 5 to 7 parties are optimal: far left, center left, center, center right, far right - and a couple extras to cover the gaps. Trust me, you don't want that. Flanders has the 7 parties covering those different portions of the political landscape, and the extra ones to cover the gaps. The votes are pretty much spread out and as a result no government can be formed without at least 3 parties joining together. So after each election the parties have to create compromises and eliminate most of their election programs in order to co-exist with whichever other parties got elected. Even then it's impossible to create a government that can pass any law that's even the slightest bit innovative, because there's always one of the governing parties blocking anything that's not in their optimal strategy (or just blocking the competition from doing anything that would gain them votes in the next election). Where a 2-party government has the ability to screw things up it also has the power to do things right. A watered down multi-party system is pretty much powerless.
  7. I read "The Catcher in the Rye" last month and finished in a record sitting. It has a very fluent proze that makes it easy to get hooked in.
  8. The age of globalization. The one defining attribute of these years is that the world has become much smaller. Information from all over the world has become available when we turn on our television screens or at the click of the computer mouse. Because the world has become smaller our technology cycles have become shorter. Because the world has become smaller there's a growing consciousness - and people care more - about world problems we would otherwise not have known about. Because the world has become smaller we have become more focused on making our tiny part of the world more rich than is possible. For ourselves we strive to compete with global examples of major successes in financial richness, comfort and emotional richness. We try to make ourselves stand out more in a world we can not possibly compete with. It's the change from a village mentality, where everyone knows everyone but nothing from what's outside the walls, to a global mentality, where everyone knows (or can know) everything in the world but doesn't take time to learn about their neighbors and falls back on an impossible self-improvement mission that is the defining change of this time.
  9. One meal less than it will be this afternoon. Now I can't wait 'till lunch anymore!
  10. We need a revival of platform games. Some of the early ninety's games deserve sequels that can live up to the originals: Crystal Caves or Jetpack (that game was só much fun to edit!) or a new Keen game. I think I'm gonna install DosBox again...
  11. 1. Age: d) 20 to 25 years old 2. Gender: Male 3. Country of origin: Belgium 4. Favorite Game Genre: e) Real Time Strategy (Management is a pretty big genre not to include! This is my second choice.) 5. Do you prefer a story that is: a) Linear? 6. Do you prefer dialog that is: b) Text? 7. What gender do you prefer the protagonist to be? c) Don't care 8. Which of these would have the most influence on your decision to purchase a game? b) Gameplay 9. How long is your ideal game? a) Short and sweet (but highly re-playable) 10. A happy ending or a sad one? a) Happy 11. Would you be interested in a game commentating on the environmental crisis? b) No 12. Would you rather a game with moral choice or a game with moral meaning? c) Morality has no place in games 13. Would you play a game if it was used as a learning tool? b) No 14. Do you prefer games that are: b) Depart from reality
  12. It used to be a site with some good tutorials for free, but a year or two ago it changed to the pay-for-tutorial system it has now. So yes, they expect you to pay. [smile]
  13. I have to agree that "Technological Revolution" is not the best term to describe the larger part of the previous century. Maybe "Electrical Revolution" or "Transistor Revolution" (but that sound horrible)? Anyway, we're already past that when the "Communications Revolution" started at the end of the 20th century. Everyone owning cellphones, information from across the world available from anywhere, private data being volunteered by virtually everyone - we've been living in a whole new world for years now. The next step would probably be a "Robotics Revolution" where we see robots become cheaply available for most menial work (cleaning, building, destructing). The kind that are already present for a lot of money or are still to impractical to be used will be under the Christmas tree in all homes in twenty years, I reckon.
  14. There are a couple of advantages (over Flash) in my opinion: - The ability to be able to use c# and vb.net in the code-behind. - The fact that I can (or will be able to - as it is still not possible without limitations) share code between a winforms app and a Silverlight app. - No other platform has as many ready-made components as the .Net framework. There's a lot of work I won't have to do anymore. It might not be available everywhere just yet, but with Windows 7 around the corner soon most pc's shipped will be pre-installed with it. In a couple of years Silverlight should be as common as Flash is today.
  15. Going a little bit off topic here... Quote:Original post by capn_midnightIt would take a really, really exceptional candidate for me to accept someone without a CS or SE degree. Could you explain the reasoning behind that criterium ? I think of myself as a pretty competent programmer - at least as competent as all the s.e.-graduates I know, but I don't have a degree. Why would you not hire me? Personally I've seen to much utterly incompetent people come out of those programs to give any value to the degree. It's testing during the job-interview or nothing as far as I'm concerned.