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ray_intellect

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  1. Nice article, I learned CUDA, have to admit the logic of some CUDA programs can be difficult to follow, however its a pleasure.
  2. There is a demo for Ogre3d that has a fully destructible voxel based environment
  3. Thanks for that, marketing information is gold dust, very difficult to obtain or even pay for. I really lost time trying to figure this out.
  4. I'm going to be honest, the geometry looks easy to create, the texture maps looks a little repetitive. If you created the texture maps, then it depends on the quality (and resolution) of the maps, perhaps they should be in a separate pack.   I think you are on the right track with regards to building creation, as there is a full interior, that's a plus worth mentioning. For the exterior (façade especially) I think you have a good rough model that needs some more detail before it is worth the $45, perhaps improvements to the windows and doors, some drain pipes, perhaps a fire escape, perhaps a route up to the roof. In particular the doorway and stairs at the front look too simple. The colour scheme could be reviewed too, I think the grey at the edges and separating the floors looks too similar in colour to the walls. Also perhaps there could be some air vents and plumbing pipes.
  5. I thought of something else,   1) comic book (batman) style alleyway dead ends.   2) parallel roads could link up to another road ( U turn links etc )   3) entrance to large scale city area ...i.e. the park, the zoo, a large train station/ monorail, sport stadium, freeway, construction area   4) City centre apartment area with members only gate
  6. Nice graphics, did your team develop that in-house? Ideas to block roads ... 1) car crashed into corrugated iron work hut and knocked over scaffolding holding uniform grey cement blocks. You could have fun making a mess out of the effect of a smashed block turning into a dust splat. 2) Bus tried to do a U-turn and got stuck in the road, everyone except the driver got out and walked (on the other side of the bus - the doors aren't facing the player) 3) road works 4) building exploded leaving rubble everywhere 5) police have put plastic tape up and stand guarding the road, if you fire your rocket launcher at them - you die. 6) earthquake. 7) I'm bored, get a copy of hl2 and some of the mods.
  7. Thanks for sharing, all I know is that branching can massively increase complexity, I have attempted a game story with 2 way branches at each zone/level, and this quickly became difficult to manage, so I changed my story and basically inserted the other level paths into one storyline. I never actually made the game. I think with good tools branching in text is more possible (and less likely to cause problems).
  8. This UI http://imageshack.us/a/img46/4721/fsgx.jpg   And this map http://imageshack.us/a/img7/6375/7t3k.jpg   I prefer the rounded corners and tend to avoid the 'close' button in game UI.
  9. That's why writing for games isn't very highly rated, I think you have got a point and the competition to provide 'shocking' content is getting sleazy and boring. A bit like seeing a shark sawn in half, seen one and you've seen em all. So yeah perhaps you could make your game have a friendly character from the opposite faction, (friendly orc, troll, ogre, dog, spider, goblin, zombie (Gollum is one, however he is a traitor), ring wraith, ghost.... etc). And you could use the story of that character to explore those issues. The trick is that you need to incorporate the themes into your design (was the film called green mile?, and Sintel the open movie actually goes into great thematic depth) and keep the normal look'n'feel, so perhaps you are considering an extreme art pipeline and a great orchestral music setup ... then I think most of what you want to do has been done before in various limited ways.
  10. Recently game graphics at the high end have become so good that quality isn't a problem, the graphics approach photo realism in a lot of cases. Now what I was thinking is that perhaps in some of the top quality recent games, the art quality exceeds what would be appropriate for the design. The reason is, that if every scene is perfectly decorated and textured to meet the art teams aesthetic goals, then perhaps it becomes difficult to make a scene stand out in terms of visual appeal, so I am describing a kind of contrast between beautiful, mundane, and just plain ugly. I think a lot of games are designed with the notion that reality sets the mundane threshold, and games should be out of the mundane all the time ... I am inclined to disagree because several games had the effect of looking normal after a certain amount of time (Mass effect, Rage, Zelda windwaker, Crysis, Gears of war) to the extent that I was really not impressed when I finally reached the nuclear power core, or end of game boss, or any special storyline features. So in my own designs I consider setting up a quality contrast, creating an in-game mundane look to use for non-extraordinary world features, and yet on the other hand I wonder of it isn't better to purchase and own a visual orgasm of artistic quality? Perhaps good ideas are under going constant recycling and reality no longer has anything to offer but a larger set of bills and expenses, and creativity will simply be categorizable into sets of known and pre-used elements... but of course the average game is still regarded as having low literary quality, and the directing isn't really appreciated by older generations. Perhaps I should close my eyes and wait until the excitement has died down before looking critically at the result, with or without the perfectly dented trash can, artfully shaped corrugated iron and rubble. I appreciate that setting a mundane might even save money, but the real big deal is whether to follow a rule of escapism in dealing with game content, or the immersive which requires the quality contrast.
  11. Thanks for the responses, the type of networking I want to add (or have the capability for) includes simple multiplayer games, cooperative game play, network classic dm style game play, database registration, online content streaming, scalable morpg server capability etc, chat server, voip server   I have got loads of ideas, however I can't easily implement all this myself so a good high level general purpose middleware solution (and hopefully free, gpl or mit) with hopefully some examples would be ideal ... I am not looking for the best of any, just need the platform coverage and stability ... this should more or less cover the network back end of any software project.   I might still use an engine for my current game, maybe unity or udk, however I prefer to see the code because I have experience.
  12. Hi, I want to support as many platforms as possible for networking, is there a good popular choice? What does Unity use? 
  13. I have been waiting since January for the latest OpenGL sdk from Nvidia, do they ever plan to release it?  
  14. I want it, however the price for a solo developer just wanting to build a prototype scared me away, the giro here is just £140 for two weeks, and as I am currently out of work I really can't afford to buy. Credit is due to the fantastically talented team, I'd just say, please do not make the word 'unity' into a metaphor for 'monopoly' if only for the sake of beautiful code (or something), maybe give us some real goods to use for free before we consider a release?
  15. Hmm, but if you consider two colour buffers and alpha blending then you need stencil states and gamma ramps, fog, slope scale, near and far planes and suddenly the permutations have become so large that you need to write a 10 page article ... I would just add the GS and tessellation shaders then mention compute shaders as a non cooperative part, for completeness. However I suppose that as fixed function is basically obsolete you might be right to just mention the minimal vertex and fragment shaders.