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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

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  1. Or perhaps they've already filled the position from someone in need of a H1B and simply doing what is required of them by the law by trying to not find a qualified American employee :P It's fairly standard practice for senior roles where you already have someone in mind but need the actual paperwork to prove that no qualified American can be found. Not sure how common it is within game development though but I imagine senior talent can be even harder to find in that sector. Most likely though you simply didn't fit what they were looking for, perhaps you were too young, too old, too tall, too expensive, too experienced, not experienced enough or something else. You can always write them and talk to them but it sounds like you got excluded extremely early in the process so the reason will probably be extremely arbitrary and uninteresting.
  2. If you want to be really really in control you can always write a hypervisor around the operating system. Take a look at Blue Pill. Should be fairly impossible for the kids to gain back control. That's a bit of cutting edge research as far as this type of hiding software goes though so it might not be very easy for you to implement it. There's source available if you want to look at it.
  3. Quote: Then again, games get cracked quite fast lately The Playstation 3 got it right by using trusted computing components only. The XBOX 360 nearly got it right but failed on the DVD drive which is flashable via a normal SATA interface. Much of the work for trusted computing platforms has already been made by the people who have engineered and re-engineered SIM cards. If you can read the PIN from a SIM card, let me know :P There's really only two viable future paths for AAA games, either embed a crucial online component if you plan to build your game for the PC or launch your game on a console, port it to PC, launch it for the PC well after the consoles versions and just hope you get some revenue out of the PC port. Is there even anyone working on stuff like AAA PC exclusive titles anymore or even focusing on PC development first who aren't doing one of the two things I mentioned?
  4. Quote: I know some pppl will hate me for saying this but if u want to make some cash target the mac/iphone Make a fart application, become a millionaire :P I'm surprised that Apple, who are so concerned about their image, are letting these low grade applications in.
  5. If you've been following Swedish politics (who doesn't, right?) we've introduced an extremely strict law here against copyright infringement. Basically if your IP address turns up in one of the file sharing networks the copyright holder or his representatives can request that all your computers be confiscated and searched for illegal material. Basically they send the repo man to come get your hardware, not the police. Later on you'll get sued for anything they find and if you lose you get to pay the court costs of both parties. So far the fallout has been pretty dramatic with a total Internet bandwidth usage in Sweden dropping by a whopping 30% on the day the law was introduced. Today we have started getting the reports on the effects of the major reduction in file sharing. You can read about it here. The gist of it is that legal downloading of music has increased with 100% since the law was introduced and long term projections indicate an annual increase of 30%. If you're developing software which is actively being pirated you can bet your ass that you're being hurt by it. DRM is shit and clearly we need more aggressive laws, not technology, in order to target this issue. It's gone way too far out of hand and it's now completely acceptable to consume without giving back. The other solution is of course to go the way of the Playstation 3 with trusted computing where all internal communication is encrypted and only signed software can be executed, or to use the model of MMORPGs and make your software a thin client to the actual value in the form of a service. I'm actually fairly pissed off at Microsoft that they failed to implement their trusted computing platform properly on the 360 but they have a shitty security record and are hardly competent when it comes to this area. Maybe the XBOX 180 would have been better.
  6. Quote: I was under the impression this was over If you live in a western country chances are your country has signed the Wassenaar Arrangement. Other than that most countries do not control export of cryptography. If you have a product which falls under this agreement you need to contact your local government organization and apply for an export permit since they do fall under the export of weapons. Law firms in particular love this agreement. Never heard of a hash function which falls under these restrictions.
  7. Java is 14 years old. How long will it take until these mythical performance characteristics of JIT methods are realized? I'm way too busy doing actual work to worry about these things but once they come to fruition I'll be the first in line.
  8. This book has a regimen which will get you pretty fit. I used to follow it myself pretty rigorously and went from about 214 pounds to 165 pounds with a pretty rapid pace (less than a year) and went from being at about no ability to run at all to running about 6 miles per day with a 44 pound backpack. It doesn't really try to get you to the bulky type body builder type of fitness though, it focuses more on training for military type work, i.e real endurance strength with long muscle fibers. It has a full program with nutrition and daily workout schedules. If you follow it you will get fit however you will go pretty hungry if you're used to eating too much but the food is slow carbohydrates and protein rich so it's really good for building up endurance. I ended up leaving that program and going for bulkier muscle mass with about an hour per day in the gym and an hour of running with no backpack. If you really want to bulk up this book will be of no help.
  9. My personal record is about 5 months without being paid. It's quite easy to miss a months payment if your payment comes monthly. The problem is that once you stay beyond that month you become committed since you now have a financial stake in the company. I ended up being paid along with a huge bonus so in the end it worked out extremely well for me but it was definitely a stupid risk to take. Getting fired with paychecks unpaid would make me extremely nervous since the company could be going bankrupt and that means you'll have to get in line with all the creditors and so on and probably be the last in line to get paid. Not sure what the priorities are like for the bankrupcy manager in the US? Quote: Yep, they haven't been paid in almost four months Says 2.5 months on that website? I guess some could be worse off than others though.
  10. Quote: The idea that the average government or office worker would be expected to use Linux, even Ubuntu, is laughable. Where I used to work a few years back we were 75,000 employees, all on Solaris. The idea that individual countries within the EU could decide to completely eradicate Windows in a government setting in favor of open solutions isn't laughable and Microsoft is taking the threat very seriously I bet since the consequences when the government of one country decides to switch are pretty massive.
  11. Quote: and some have argued that Microsoft is simply doing its job, to develop and sell its software Microsoft is most definitely doing their job. The purpose of Microsoft as an entity is to maximize profits by taking over and dominating any market they can. The purpose of government is to make sure that these entities, who according to the law are persons, aren't allowed to stand in the way of the public good. There really is no ceiling for the ambitions of a corporation so you need to cut up corporations that grow too big and let them restart or hinder them from entering all markets they wish to enter. That's how government makes sure you have competition and an actual ceiling for growth. Individuals within the corporation aren't acting in a manner which is unjust or wrong it's just the old principle that none of us are as evil as all of us.
  12. Just do the calculation in the x dimension only and set the result of the equation to 0.5 then you need to solve for t, plug that t back into the equation for the y dimension and get y. Unless I misunderstand what you need?
  13. Link multiple Quadratic Bézier curves together using a Bézier spline. Evaluating the function naively is as easy as the formula in the first link. It's possible to do it much more efficiently, mostly via forward differences.
  14. Quote: here isn't *technically* a monopoly It's impossible to uninstall Internet Explorer which is one of the things the EU doesn't like. They would also really like to cut up the company into smaller entities. Personally I like the idea of having an OS ship with as many components as possible to be honest, however what the EU is trying to do is to split these components over multiple companies so that you don't have a very monolithic market. Now if Microsoft chose to bundle the software of another vendor I'm sure everything would be fine. It's the same reason you don't want these gigantic banks and auto companies who are too big to fail. The USA is extremely bad at dealing with these situations and the US government is a complete lapdog to the large US companies. Americans in general have a hard time understanding the European mindset when it comes to work and corporations. When you cut up a company it's not like you're killing a person. You want many competing entities in order to protect the consumer. That's a key difference here, the US government sets aside the consumer in favor of the corporation while the EU sets aside the corporation in favor of the consumer. If Microsoft wants to continue operating on the EU market they'll have to learn this mentality and start adapting to it.
  15. You can't. The problem even when just exposing interfaces is that they use a vtable which is generally located as a pointer within the first 4 or 8 bytes, depending on native pointer size, of the class in Microsoft Visual C++. However there is no guarantee that all other compilers will implement it the same way. Furthermore not all compilers will call methods the same way, that is __thiscall isn't well defined like __cdecl and __stdcall. Generally __thiscall on Microsoft Visual C++ passes the this pointer in the ECX registry which is x86 specific. Most compilers are able to compile code that works in the same way as COM does though so it would be VERY advisable to make sure your classes are binary compatible with COM interfaces. COM is extremely simple once you start studying it, the most complex issues relate to multi threading and marshalling but I doubt you need to consider that for your simple system. The COM model can easily be translated to the other major platforms and you can easily write something which will work in a similar manner to COM yet cross compiles.