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lerno

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  1. Our game (War Arcana https://www.facebook.com/war.arcana/) we have some rather minor UI effects: level up a skill and there's a small particle flash to celebrate it, enter the magician and there are some ambient "particles" floating around in the background and so on. We don't have any huge ambitions in regards to the particle designs - we're making do with whatever we're able to quickly sketch out in a tool (like this one: http://onebyonedesign.com/flash/particleeditor/) Since the game itself is a turn-based 2D strategy, effects are not essential but still would be nice to have. Working on this we got to thinking that maybe there are people out there who both a) like playing around with particle effects (and VFX) b) would like to get credited in a game – and would do it for free. If you would like to contribute particle effects/VFX to the game, get in touch with us at info@aegik.com. You should be able to find your way around a particle editor (or similar) without help, other than that we have no requirements. If you like - and are able to - you could suggest and design other visual effects to enhance the game as well.
  2. Winning the battle possibly captures the opponent, or the opponent simply loses the army and escapes. It's used to kill other player's characters. There is also a battle against border armies and strongholds. These also simply annihilate the defense allowing you to pass through the area or take the stronghold. Note that this is a separate action though. You might simply defeat the castle army and choose *not* to seize it.
  3. Here is the "buy army" screen...
  4. That is similar to what I tried, but it doesn't appear to work very well visually with (mostly) a single army type on each side.
  5. In what sense? It's a fantasy RPG/Strategy if that helps?
  6. No, the battle is extremely predictable (which is a fundamental game decision in the game) and you know all about your opponent. There is a tiny variance in efficiency from battle to battle, but it is hardly noticeable. Do you have a video link to those automated battles in C&C3? I could not find anything.
  7. Our game has a very simple combat resolution. Roughly, attacking with an army of X against an army of Y units and being victorious you'll lose Y units (and if the opponent is stronger, the enemy will lose X). (e.g. attack with 320 against an army of 50 and you'll loose 50 units) – So by design combat is extremely predictable and straightforward. At the same time, combat is a rather rare occurrence and is something that should feel "special". So the question is how to visualise it. Looking at other games there's the "Animated armies battling it out" style, and "Card game style" (with "cards" alternating taking damage). "Animated armies" feels a bit wrong for our game, since you mostly only have a single army type (and honestly it needs to look very good not to feel corny). I tried the "card game" approach, with the army "card" taking damage, but it was rather boring - again because each side usually has a single army type. There's the original "Pirates!" approach where the amounts for each side is slowly ticking down until one side defeated, but I don't know if that is interesting enough. What possibilities am I overlooking? Adding too complex a screen will be a bit weird as the battle is straightforward. But I don't just want to throw up the popup with the result.
  8.   Since it is your own character who does the questing, death is actually off the table. Without going too much into details, a player should be awarded for being first in investigating a cave/ruin. The resources are mainly actions turns, army and possibly one's own health. To elaborate a bit, I'll use the Dragon Caves as an example that already is balanced: - A player may attack a Dragon with their army. There are then two possible outcomes: a) The dragon is stronger than the army: in this case, around 20% of the army is decimated, but they steal away with parts of the treasure, at around 80% of the value of the dead warriors. There is a slight chance to get an item or a spell, which is larger if a larger army is used. b) The army is stronger than the dragon. In this case the dragon will die and a large part of the army will die. The reward is 80-150% of the lost army in terms of gold + a chance for a magical item or spell. For dragon caves, each "try" will lose you around 4% of your army's value, plus the cost in action turns to make the attempt. Collecting a sufficiently large army will defeat the dragon, but will often cost more than the gold gained. However, there is the chance at a magical item, or that the dragon horde might actually be larger than the armies lost. (There are other things to do in a dragon cave, but they're not relevant for the discussion) A ruin/quest is similar: you try to defeat the monster to get an award of a magical item or spell. However, it differs from the dragon in two very significant ways: a) It is intended that a weak character should be able to win against the weakest monsters b) The army should not be used for questing. It's especially b) which makes it difficult, and yet it's also this that makes it different from the dragon cave.
  9. Maybe I should have clarified that this is a vastly different game from Warlords 2. Typically 100+ players running on a map that is 80x80 tiles. Yes, that is how it works currently, but it's not ideal for several reasons. It's a bit hard to explain why without going into the details of the game - which is hard to do as it doesn't quite fit into an existing genre. Best summary would be "Trade Wars 2002 in a fantasy world" :) That's why I'm more interested in references than solutions.
  10. I have a strategy game where I decided to add ruins and caves that originally were intended to work like the quest locations in Warlords 2. For a quick review, this was basically a random encounter against a hero's strength (only heroes could enter) and a bit of randomness. What you could uncover if successful was some sort of magic item. If failed, then the hero died. A quest-location could only be "defeated" once, after which it was empty for the rest of the game. Now in my case you actually have the player's "character" walking around with the army, so it's that character who will enter the quest. For obvious reasons it's not very welcome to have a random chance of a player losing the game because their character died in a quest (that's more or less only intended to add atmosphere).   Another issue is that the number of players will vastly outnumber the amount of ruins and caves. I've implemented various variants (more or less complicated), but none has felt "right", so now I'm looking to see if there are some other games that has similar features that I could use for inspiration.   Recommendations?
  11. This is actually something that predatory studios do, and artists have to keep their guard up to protect themselves from it. This guy has probably dealt with that situation before, and for whatever reason, apparently your correspondence triggered his pattern detector and got his guard up.   Yeah as above it could be lost-in-translation issues, but in future, I'd be very upfront about what the outcomes of an art-test will be, and what the time-frames are for those outcomes. If you ever move these goal posts, or fail to define them in the first place, you could easily scare people like this guy has been scared. I like to think that I was very upfront about that test, which I also deliberately tried to make minimal in scope / effort to avoid wasting his time unnecessarily. And ironically, he lashed out at me when I wanted to award the project to him on strength of that art test.  :(
  12. Thank you for all comments, it has been helpful and great food for thought.
  13. Luckily this was before signing any agreements. I can understand the communication issues, since I deal with people that aren't always good at english, that is a risk. But what usually happens (what I expect) is that they voice their concerns, not trying to mock and openly provoke. This is not the first time I've run into people who were "less than professional". They're not the majority, but enough that you start thinking that maybe there is a reason that they are freelancing rather than having a job at some game company. Ideas how to deal with them (and perhaps how to notice them early)?
  14. We were evaluating several artists, and finally (thought) we had settled for this one artist who had done pretty solid stuff. So I personally initiated discussion with him over Skype, and at some point he must have misunderstood my questions - aimed at getting payment & delivery details into the contract - as stringing him along. And from that point on he started to get very disrespectful and boorish. I explained the situation, which he at first did not understood, but continued to talk in a very impolite manner, then finally it became clear to him that he might have made a mistake. But that sort of behaviour is not something I feel I can work with and trust. So I wrote him a letter, and this is what happened (my e-mail at the bottom and his last response at top):   http://i.imgur.com/AN9yXs4.png   Anyone else who ran into similar unpleasantness? How do you deal with it?
  15.   I'm all too aware of the cost  :) but the scope for us is rather narrow (a 2D map tile set), so high cost is not a major problem if they deliver things to the quality we want. The problem is that this type of art is not that commonly produced anymore. Most engines are 3D. This appears to mean that some studios will promise they can deliver the style, even though they don't have someone with deep experience making tiles. Having a general concept artist doing map tiles for the first time is not a very efficient use of time and money...   <_<