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Ceoddyn

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About Ceoddyn

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  1. Ceoddyn

    Introducing War Machines

    i want to hear more about steve
  2. Ceoddyn

    Epoch Release 4

    I'm not sure if you care about the amount of attention your releases receive or not, I just want to add as well that I don't have the time to learn this language, but reading about its creation is fascinating. Keep it up!
  3. Ceoddyn

    ...More Terrain

    So today I decided to implement this rendering list I've been thinking about for the terrain quadtree. After some mucking about I came up with a pretty awesome method that maintains a static list of nodes. This way I only add/remove nodes that have either become hidden or visible since the last frame rather than rebuilding the entire thing every time. This only applies generally to 10 or less nodes a frame so it ends up being pretty fast. Most of the nodes also stay in order which cuts down on the sort run time as well. This bit of code isn't long, but I'm particularly proud of it for some reason: private void FillList() { if (CameraManager.ActiveCamera.Frustum.Contains(mNodeBoundingBox) != ContainmentType.Disjoint) { if (mIsEndNode) { mDistance = Vector3.DistanceSquared(mPosition, CameraManager.ActiveCamera.Position); if (!mIsListed) mRenderSort.Add(this); } else { mNodeUL.FillList(); mNodeUR.FillList(); mNodeLL.FillList(); mNodeLR.FillList(); } mIsListed = true; } else if (mIsListed) RemoveChildren(); } private void RemoveChildren() { mIsListed = false; if (mIsEndNode) mRenderSort.Remove(this); else { mNodeUL.RemoveChildren(); mNodeUR.RemoveChildren(); mNodeLL.RemoveChildren(); mNodeLR.RemoveChildren(); } } You guys are probably starting to hate pictures of the same old terrain, so I promise this will be the last one. Tomorrow I move on to something new!
  4. Ceoddyn

    Radiohead

    Just got back from a Radiohead show. at the hollywood bowl. fucking mindblowing. the bowl is a pretty awesome place as well: exit music was great and is probably my new favorite radiohead song. they did a completely out of control version of idioteque. I felt like i was at a justice show. paranoid android is pretty much the perfect rock song. street spirit was another classic although I was really hoping to hear an acoustic version of it. the acoustics were busted out for wolf at the door and faust arp however. the show ended with johnny greenwood and ed o'brien doing a drum machine/synth "everything in its right place" jam which was a perfect ending to the night. set list: 1. 15 Step 2. There There 3. Morning Bell 4. All I Need 5. Pyramid Song 6. Nude 7. Arpeggi/Weird Fishees 8. The Gloaming 9. The National Anthem 10. Wolf at the Door 11. Faust Arp 12. Exit Music 13. Jigsaw Falling into Place 14. Idioteque 15. Climbing up the walls 16. Bodysnatchers 17. How to Dissappear Completely encore: Videotape Dollars and Cents Paranoid Android Street Spirit Reckoner 2nd encore: House of cards Lucky Everything In Its Right Place
  5. Ceoddyn

    Game Concept

    I finally put my jumbled weed-induced thoughts on the game in to something resembling words. I was originally opposed to this explanation because of all the shit people trying to make online RPGs get, but here it goes: It's going to be a online action RPG set in a fantasy world. There will only be player vs player combat and I want the gameplay to be fast, almost on the level of a FPS. It will be based around nations fighting each other to take control of various points of interest (towns, towers, etc.), each of which will be in its own seperate instance. Guilds within a nation can claim locations their nation owns which will provide them with bonuses and a steady supply of resources with which they can craft equipment. Players will join instances through a battle.net style interface where a list of game lobbies will be displayed showing all contested locations a player can join. Characters will progress through a skill system based on PvP participation/results and a simplistic crafting system. Because there are no monsters to grind or long roads to travel before you can do anything interesting, I'm hoping people will find this game a lot more accessible than the average online RPG. Resources will be gained through winning battles and owning locations over time rather than clicking on trees, and combined with the simplistic crafting system will make getting decent equipment not too time-consuming. Locations will be locked to a certain range of levels so players won't be playing against people far lower/higher levels than themselves. In this way everyone can contribute to their nation as lower levels will fight for outposts and towers while higher level players fight for castles and keeps which provide a greater benefit to their nation. Once a nation takes a certain portion of all locations (~90%?) the entire game will reset, ensuring no player or nation can become unstoppably overpowered. I'm hoping the game will cause players to feel loyalty to their nation rather than their character, eliminating any drama over character resets. =================================================== Now that that's over with, here's some secondary explanation. I understand I'm way out of my league trying to create this on my own. I also know the pitfalls of trying to make a team and developing online games. My current plan is to keep programming the game alone until I have something presentable, and then look into getting some artists to lend me a hand. It also helps that I have cut out many of the difficult aspects of online RPGs including content creation (no quests, only basic story elements, no NPCs whatsoever) and load balancing (the game instances can be very easily seperated on to multiple servers if needed, instances are capped to a manageable number of players). I currently believe I'm capable of doing all or most of the programming on my own. There is still quite a long road ahead of me, but I can already see the small, dim light at the end of the tunnel. If you have any questions please feel free to shoot. I'm specially interested in any flaws you can see in the admittedly small overview of the game I've presented. EDIT: I also noticed both imageshack and paint were blowing ass in their own special ways, so I switched the last couple posts to tinypic and will start saving pictures in GIMP. Here's detail mapping that went in before I pass out to honor the occasion: All of these textures (four diffuse, blend, normal, detail) are really starting to slow down my rendering. hopefully sorting the quads will help this.
  6. Ceoddyn

    More Terrain

    Still slowing bangin away on the terrain. I've changed my mind slightly about the type of game I'm trying to make which cut down on the performance I'm going to need out of the terrain a lot. For now I'm trying to work with just one 1024x1024 map in any one round. Anyway, here you can see the 1024x1024 map working pretty flawlessly: This is due in part to two things 1) Drawing from a normal map rather than storing it per vertex, which allows for much smoother shading (and I think better performance?) 2) Switching from VertexPositionNormalTexture to my own VertexPosition format which cuts down on the vertex memory by ~60% Lastly, I integrated XNAnimation into my project which took virtually no time at all. I was seriously amazed at how easy this library is to work with and hopefully it'll work for everything I'm gonna need out of animation. Here's a marine from the DirectX SDK chillin at 0,0,0 during all my testing. I'm gonna need to get some camerachase action going on for this guy soon.
  7. Ceoddyn

    Moving the world

    you're recalculating every objects position in the world every frame either way, but it's just easier in my opinion to picture the camera moving rather than the entire world
  8. Ceoddyn

    color saturation filter in HLSL

    clamps the values range from 0 to 1
  9. It doesn't seem like something you're going to be able to accomplish on your own. Just creating all of the art you could possibly want in game would take an extremely long time. I would suggest laying down enough of a base game as to attract other people to lend you a hand. If you know some VB.net, might I suggest trying your hand at C# and XNA? Microsoft has put together some awesome tutorials for you to get started with. I believe it will let you get to work on actual gameplay much faster than DirectX would.
  10. If you're only switching between two frames of a sprite every 3ms what could you possibly expect but flickering?
  11. Ceoddyn

    Multitexturing

    Just a quick little update- multitexturing is of course a lot more presentable than LOD, so of course it had to go in first! Here are some shots: I pull three texture values from a RGB color map and fill in missing values with a backup 'dirt' texture. My plan is to allow each quadnode to set its own four textures which will hopefully be enough for whatever I can fit inside one of them.
  12. Ceoddyn

    Quadtree

    I managed to implement a quadtree into the engine to structure the terrain. Currently I'm displaying 9 sections of 512x512 terrain which are split up down to 128x128 quadnodes. I'm hoping properly scaled this will give me a decent view distance and good performance. That combined with removing savestate from my spritebatch draws gave me a large increase in FPS. I'm still not doing any LOD although I plan on implementing a single vertexbuffer and many indexbuffers like this post: LOD. Thanks to the comment from my last post I also turned the depth buffer back on after spritebatch draw calls and fixed the transparent terrain problem. I'll leave you with some screenshots although they're not much different from the last ones (I got bored with the grass texture I was using though :p). Up next is multi-texturing and some LOD
  13. Ceoddyn

    Books on shaders, HLSL

    GPU Gems 1&2 are also available for free on nVidia's website
  14. changing SaveStateMode to None will also result in a large increase in FPS.
  15. Ceoddyn

    Back

    It's been nearly two years since my last entry, but I've decided to get back into the game here. I'm currently entering my sophomore year at UC Santa Barbara as a computer science major, just as I had planned back then. Though I was hoping to get into a hip east coast private school I couldn't possibly be happier with where I ended up. If any of you are thinking about attending UCSB I can attest to the fun you will have here :) I looked back on my previous entries before writing this which were fairly amusing. However, it almost feels like no matter how naive I was back then that what I know now doesn't amount to that much more. Hell, I even managed to finish a game back then, which I don't think will happen for a very long time with my new project. Still, what I've managed to accomplish so far has been very exciting for me and hopefully I will stick with this for the long haul. Anyway, I'm now working with the XNA platform, the ease of which has made transitioning to 3D for me an extremely pleasant experience. I think having started with this is going to make me regret having to go into openGL or DX some day (which will undoubtedly happen). I've mainly been working on back end stuff and implementing various graphical structures through a couple sites (roecode and riemers) and riemer's new book which I knew based off his site would be a good purchase (and was). On my terrain system I've been working on I'm experiencing a wierd problem where terrain viewed from one direction will look fine, but turn the camera 90 degrees and I get wierd clipping/transparent terrain issues. I'm hoping it's just the basiceffect being weird because when I render it as a wireframe it turns out fine. This is turning out to be longer than I intended so I'll leave you with some cool pictures of a basic menu and some atmospheric scattering (both with a tip of the hat to roecode).
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