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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

Dranith

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  1. DX11

    To add to the last post, here is a full article on how to manage fixed timesteps well. It is pretty good. http://gafferongames.com/game-physics/fix-your-timestep/
  2. Quote:Original post by strtok Here's how I did it: 1. Read lots of books; learned a lot about subjects I wasn't familiar with 2. Built a game demo in my spare time, where I applied the things I'd learned and put them into practice 3. Submitted applications to a whole load of studios 4. Eventually got hired! I would definitely suggest building a demo to include with a resume. It goes a long way. What strtok wrote is pretty good advice. Teaching yourself and use that knowledge to build a demo of some sort is very helpful, especially with 6 years of actual software engineering experience. I would suggest working on a demo with a small group of people, and be able to talk about it. That worked wonders for me. I was applying for jobs fresh out of school but had extensive work on various projects that my friends and I had created. Not one place actually even saw the code, or the demo running but my interviews consisted almost exclusively of talking about it. How it was designed. How certain parts were coded. What I worked on / how I contributed. Etc... This extended to interviews at more traditional 'business' coding jobs as well. In the end, I took one of the more traditional software engineering jobs (can't argue with much higher pay/benefits than game industry) .. but I did have offers from game companies as well. Good luck!
  3. I recently switched from using CVS to SVN. I wish I had switched a long time ago. SVN is so much easier to use, especially when running a Windows server. So I guess add another vote to the SVN camp.
  4. Quote:Original post by Platinum_Dragon Dranith, I only take part of your situation and pull it towards one extrema, but you pull back towards the other extrema. You see, the system has only two directions too go, toward one extreme or the other. If you cannot decide with side of the extreme to be on, then you will want somewhere in the middle. The point in the spectrum is just not in the right balance for your taste, but designers will not know where the point will satisfy the most players. I believe that Wow shows that designers do know where the point that satisfies the most players is. It just doesn't happen to be my taste, which as you said is somewhere in the middle((EQ + WoW) >> 1). I know my tastes in this case aren't the norm and I've come to terms with the fact that it will be a while, if ever, before an MMO that satisfies those tastes exists. I just was weighing in on the conversation. I wasn't trying to be the typical internet denizen who believes that "If I don't like it EVERYONE WHO DOES IS WRONG! Designers need to listen to ME!".
  5. Quote:Original post by Platinum_Dragon Dranith, you identify two problems of questing. Problem 1: Travelling takes too much time. Running back and forth between quest giver and quest location is what I'm talking about. I actually have no problem at all with traveling taking time as long as the traveling coincides with exploration. I don't like doing a quest running back to turn it in and then the next step is to go back to where I just left to do something else. Not to mention reading quest text and figuring out the gimmick of when I need to click the doodad they gave me. Quote:Original post by Platinum_Dragon Problem 2: Mobs do not appear fast enough / players are required to kill too much to complete the quest. Solution to Problem 2: Quest should not require the player to kill monsters or by gathering a specific monster drop as these condition cause the player to spend time grinding. Instead, they should be required to gather something that cannot be in competition with other players or in competition with time. This would mean that quests just take less time so there would need to be more of them to fill the same time frame. That is definitely not what I want. I have no problem at all killing many mobs either by grinding them or for kill count quests, so maybe I didn't phrase things correctly in my original post. The comments about not having enough to kill were in relation to the penalty you receive for grouping while leveling (this shows up very clearly in WoW). Quote:Original post by Platinum_Dragon With these two ideas in mind, I believe someone should be able to develop a questing system that will not be too "grind" intensive. The less time quests take, and the less you have to do with them the more there will be. Like I mentioned above, I would much rather have far fewer quests (maybe 10% of what you see in WoW) but make those quests much more significant. Make those quests take more time instead of all the 'FedEx' / 'Go pick up X' style quests that exist now. Bring killing back to be a more important part of the equation, and more directly reward exploration (somehow) instead of sticking to set roads and going where quest givers tell you. To put things in perspective, I think a game that is about halfway between what EQ was around PoP time and what WoW is now would be damn near perfect.
  6. Grinding has been demonized since a few people got huffy about the amount of time spent grinding in EQ. Instead now, we just have a different kind of grinding .. quest grinding. To me, this is as bad if not worse than the normal grinding that comes to mind when you mention the word. You spend more time running around to do and turn in quests than you do actually playing half the time. On top of it, they have devalued the experience from individual mobs so much that you can't hope to level at even a decent pace without doing quests. And then on top of THAT, they devalue the experience you get in groups so much that you are penalized for grouping. My wife and I play games together. You used to level slightly faster in a duo than solo in EQ, AC, <insert older game here> (in the general case .. yes there are exceptions). In those games it generally took longer to kill mobs so the fact that you could kill almost twice as fast was a huge benefit. In WoW things die so quickly that you run out of stuff to kill when duoing. Your experience is also cut directly in half which means while you are killing faster overall, you are gaining less experience. Both of us are sick of the quest grind. We are sick of having to run all over and do a bunch of gimmicky quest related stuff just to level. Every new game that we try now burns us out rather quickly due to quest grinding. I'd pay good money to go back to an open game that promotes exploration and killing over following the quest rails. I know we can't be the only people who feel this way. I think there can be a balance, and there needs to be a balance. Reward killing and exploration, but weave in far fewer, but much more significant quests and I'd be hooked.
  7. Quote:Original post by necreia Henceforth we shall not mention Rational Rose, or for that matter, any of the Rational Toolset-- as even muttering the name "ClearCase" three times in succession may cause a random developer in the world to instantly suffer a fatal heart attack. How can you not love config specs?! </sarcastic>
  8. Quote:Original post by Sheree Hello everyone, I am working on textures, so if I loaded many textures the work is fine, but when I want read them or just one from vertex shader the Frame rates per second(FPS) becomes very low. If you actually mean that you are accessing one of them from your vertex shader, then it is my understanding that only SM 3.0 cards support hardware vertex texture fetches. I think you can do it on pre SM3.0 cards but in that case it is done in software because the vertex processing doesn't have access to texture samplers. That would explain poor performance on the 4500, but the 8600 should be a SM4.0 card which wouldn't (shouldn't) cause a problem. Edit: Actually I got that slightly wrong. It seems your shader has to be compiled into SM4.0 to allow for hardware vertex texture fetches (which flat out wouldn't work on your 4500). This means if you aren't using the right OGL extensions, or you are using D3D9 I think you are stuck with software.
  9. Quote:Original post by Reegan Ah yeah, makes sense, thanks for clearing that up. This refactoring stuff is hard, im trying to change the code to what was suggested here but i feel like something is going to break if i refactor to much ( if you can understand what im saying ). Got any specific tips for refactoring? ill read your article on it again see if i can find any. Take a look at something called 'unit testing.' It is a pretty broad topic, but it can help you be sure that when you refactor, you don't break anything.
  10. Quote:Original post by Cambios My basic premise is this: quest heavy advancement is no better, and in many ways worse, than the "mob grind" system it was designed to replace. MMO designers would do well to re-examine this design concept, and scale back on it so quests can once again become interesting story elements rather than boring, workaday, mindless to-do lists. I agree with you. I think the new quest heavy advancement system (as you call it) is actually worse than grinding up. I honestly hate it, and am really tired of games taking that route. I quit playing LOTRO because I got tired of messing around with the quests. You spend more time having to read quests and figure out where to go than you actually spend playing. I think somewhere halfway in the middle .. mix grinding with some longer, more 'questy' feeling quests would be the best. The problem is, in these games, questing is by far the most optimal way to gain levels, that you would be a moron to not grind quests.
  11. Quote:Original post by ToohrVyk As for storing in an array, it wastes memory if the tree is not balanced. True, and you waste memory storing pointers (references) when the tree is balanced! Anyways, I always see pointers and references just different names (and potentially syntax) for the same concept. When he said "implement a tree structure in a language without pointers" I figured he was ruling out references too, since using a reference would be functionally equivalent to using pointers and an obvious choice.
  12. You can store a binary tree in an array as mentioned here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Binary_tree#Methods_for_storing_binary_trees Edit: Cool thing about doing that is you can do a level-order traversal by just walking the array. =)
  13. You are correct that rotations can be stored in 3x3 matrices, and that 4x4 are needed for translations. You also are correct in guessing that you can do all operations with 4x4 matrices. You just 'expand' the 3x3 matrix like: M = 3x3 M [0] [0] 1 Or, in other terms: a b c d e f g h i becomes a b c 0 d e f 0 g h i 0 0 0 0 1 Hope that helps.
  14. std::deque?
  15. Quote:Original post by Wavarian No "solutions" in express either, only projects. I tried the express edition then went back to my copy of VS2003.NET You can create multiple project solutions in Express ...