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2xp

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  1. Quote:Original post by Oluseyi ..Oluseyi is my first name. Please don't call it weird, it makes me hostile. Yes, it is a Nigerian name (Yourba, to be specific), and it means "God has done this." i said it was weird because i thought at first it was an invented word then i remembered a yoruba friend's name. i couldn't then decide if it was a real name or not. Quote:Original post by seanw It doesn't make sense. Anybody can write OSS. Anybody can write closed source software. Anybody can write both OSS and closed source software if they want. The license choice does not directly effect things like the interface or the innovation of it, only the program itself determines this. yeah, everybody can write software, be it closed or open. the thing is when you write open source, most of the time, you are developing it during your free time, and you have less pressure concerning interfaces than when you are developing inside a profesional & result-oriented team. Quote:Original post by flarelocke Using "I" wasn't a big problem, it's the way its use affects the article that was the problem. In informative and persuasive writing, the writer is unimportant and therefore most uses of first person are detrimental to the thesis of the article. my personal opinion is that using "i" and describing your experience is always more persuasive than using cold generalized sentences : you are "linking" with the reader and people will understand more how you arrived to that thinking. exceptions are pure science articles. again this a personal opinion&style. by the way, i can't believe someone didn't criticised me when i said OSS are not cool. you guys are more open (no pun intended) than i thought.
  2. ok thanks well in fact i discover it's with brackets [something] not with the <something> as in HTML ok, now, i hope flarelocke won't flame because i'm not capitalizing my sentences and not using proper english
  3. some sort of unreadable post i wrote there can someone tell me how to format a post, like put a sentence in italics, bold, and the quote function ?
  4. i don't have the epxertise of all of you guys, because i am a mac user and could never do anything on Linux systems, but i definetely have a couple of things to say. usability is an issue when one entity wants to reach the mass market. that means the target is the least common denominator (does that exist in english?). cypher3d said the target is joe average, well the real target is the guy with accessiblity issues, who knows a few words of english, and just knows how to use a TV remote control. you still want to give that guy the possibility to do voice chat, play a cool game, or put a nice background on his computer screen without typing a make install command. usability has never been an issue to most open source projects. open source developers are engineers, they aim to implement an algorithm they thought of, and that's all. making an interface or something readable outside the small circle of developers is well ... an option, because the priorities are performance, functionnalities, or code design issues. there is a mentality that is like this among programmers : "hmm, what if i make this audio file writer with three different algorithms to choose from and five different speedrates ? that would be cool because the user has the liberty to use the soft with his own settings. and while i'm at it, i'll add this other code so that it includes xml files. and that other network functionnality too." well this thinking is wrong. because instead of giving the guy the "liberty" to compress an audio file with 35 different settings, you actually gave him an headache and you'll wonder why your soft is being used by just a couple of pHd holders. i'm in a favor of just making softs that does the damn job (thanks apple), user oriented from the beginning. and follows the thinking : "ok, our users need to listen to some music. ok, i'll write an OGG reader, HIDE the process and i will display a nice music icon. so the users just click the button and finished" there we go. no need to show him how much time the processor used to do the task, no need to ask wether you want it at 192kpbs or at 160, and so on ... and you'll be happy when your five-year old says thanks because he can by himself listen to music. usabiblity will be an issue when OSS developers will work with some kind of pressure. this works in commercial entities. no usability, less clients. no usability, no business. hence the design teams at microsoft and apple. now, where would that pressure come from in the OS model ? having known many programmers, i am convinced this would never come from the developers (well, unless they are educated fromthe beginning) , but from the outside. that means pressure from business entities, that means more interaction with the users, that means project leaders not 100% developers ... the solution will then arise one day when OSS developers will work hand in hand with usability experts (themselves or external people) and make usability, ergonomics, accesiiblity a top priority. i'd like to explain also why usability is an issue for those who are not convinced. usability gives you more users. a CLI interface gives you access to less than 5% potential market share. a "perfect" GUI à la apple gives you let's say 99% potential market share. that includes your grandma, a guy from namibia or a visually-handicapped person. i'm not just thinking in terms of business, these extra users brings you more knowledge, more brain power, more rich interactions. i know for example a guy who develops programs by using xcode and the accessibility functions. and he is nearly blind. can't see beyond 20 centimeters. a voice reads the commands. he talks, there is voice recognition. he can also use keyboard commands. but he is one of the most imaginative mathematician i know of and gets some quality computer programs. is that possible with OSS softs ? also think about people from other domain : botanists, historians, mecanician, salesmens, physicians, etc ... thanks to usability, they can use a soft and contribute by bringing their solutions and original way of thinking to the whole business. now oluseyi (weird pseudo, is that nigerian by the way?), back to your thread, oss = technical innovation. oss developers have no clue whatsoever of usability. finally, time for some personal and biaised comments : 1. Open source softs are not cool. iLife is cool. garageband is cool. yeah it's proprietary. but i don't care how they made it. i prefer creating music than looking at some 1M code. and i don't mind paying for it. the guys worked hard for the product anyway. 2. flarelocke, give the guy a break, you are thinking typos and using "i" is a big problem, i'm thinking you are too uptight. no point in writing an essay about the uses of lists and pronouns. do you want the guy to spend one whole day writing in front of a computer instead of going out and having a life. [Edited by - 2xp on August 5, 2004 11:18:15 AM]
  5. bonjour à tous, i've seen lately in other forums guys whose avatars are not still pics but really cool animated GIFs (of themselves, i mean, not just pics a company made with a 10k $ soft) i have a lot of videos taken from my camera and would like to publish all of this. i know i can use photoshop to copy&paste every frame of my video and make a small gif out of the whole thing but do you guys know about some -free- soft that just takes an avi file and reprocess the whole thing in a painless manner ? thanks
  6. i think that anyone or any entity who worked hard or who had the intelligence to discover or made a new algorithm or software should have the rights to benefit from it, as long as they want. you can't just invest one year of your lifetime in one product just to see that some average Joe rebundled the thing and receives money while sitting on his fat ass. but i am against patents [at least the way they are described now]. just a bunch of useless administrative paperwork. so i think if a company wanted to protect a software they've made or an idea they discovered, they should hide it and never ever distribute the code. and make the interface<=>underlying implentation so obscure that any hacker would never succeed. if someone else tries to reverse engineer the thing, then so be it. if someone else discovers a better algorithm, so be it. they were more intelligent than you. the companies who cry saying "X stole my idea" are just pathetic, i guess that's because they had so much ego they talked about all over the net instead of working hard to improve their product. or because it was just part of the so-evident-ideas-a-5-year-old would discover it.
  7. thanxs kp : i know it's lazy, well i can defend myself by saying i browsed for 20 mn in 3dsmx' manual and googled the thing, then i said to myself since there are so many talented guys on gamedev i migh as well ask it directly
  8. how do i merge 2 objects ? ;-) sorry, but i just know cinema4d, and the game format is 3dsmax-compatible. i got this scene a guy made for me and there are a thousand objects and i need to make it just one so that i can use an export plug in for a special format which takes only one object. ok, thanks, guys
  9. coming from a guy who bought an 1.0 ghz ibook : pros : - u spend less time tweaking your computer, more time on the essential - macos does everything for u like automatic connection when u connect a RJ45 or when there is a wifi spot. it connects to windows networks thanks to samba, u can even launch your own web server - ilife with garageband + xcode + interfacebuilder - sturdy and light laptop u can carry anywhere - 5h30 battery - cocoa is a good language for rapid soft dev (it's ten times easier to make an app compared to using win32 and MFCs), and u can still code in c++ of java if you like. - it's easier to have a name and market a game than in the PC market, you can program just a puzzle game and people will notice it, though it maybe harder to get a job in this field (mac game programming) afterwards cons : - compatibility (you'll have a hard time when u'll be asked to work with a team to deliver a paper, everyone will be on pc, and they will use programs which are not mac-compatible) - not enough raw power (chip and graphic cards especially) but it's a 1100 euro laptop so i guess it's ok for the price. - apple are a bit overpriced for me (50$ for a one button mouse, come on, that's too much) the coolest thing is that u get compliments from girls (because it's cute ... ) and from your CS teachers (because it's UNIXbased , the uni world being really anti-MS) [Edited by - 2xp on July 26, 2004 6:06:05 AM]
  10. [QUOTE]spend the $700+ on Cubase SX just for that.[\QUOTE] with 700+, u can add 300$ and u can go buy an ibook and use garageband, that's the coolest audio software outthere (for an hobbyiest like me, that is)
  11. you don't have references to rotation angle rtri and rquan in your code. you just += them but they are not in the ogl code you should download the xcode port instead of taking some visual c
  12. hi i am a independant developer (read : hobbyist game programmer wanting to break in the gaming industry) with a couple of spare hours each day. i am planning to make a small 2D space adventure game this summer. i've read a couple of books, i created a few *basic* games, but if i do this game, i want to make sure that i'll finish this project at the end of august. so i want to plan something not too big, but not too small either. this being my kinda first serious project, i don't have ANY clue how this will happen so for all the experienced game developers, when u guys began, how much time did you need to develop a small game ? knwing i am alone and i 'll have to do all the artwork and everything
  13. hi i want to manage my character movements with glut. most of the functions i use come from nehe's tutorials. however, i found out that the app cannot manage multiple keyboard strokes, meaning i can only use one button then another button. this is quite impractical beacause i want to create an action game. do i have to use another library ? or do i have to implement more developed functions? thanks for the help i develop on MACOSX with cocoa
  14. hi i want to manage my character movements with glut. most of the functions i use come from nehe's tutorials. however, i found out that the app cannot manage multiple keyboard strokes, meaning i can only use one button then another button. this is quite impractical beacause i want to create an action game. do i have to use another library ? or do i have to implement more developed functions? thanks for the help i develop on MACOSX with cocoa
  15. [QUOTE] I don't think that Hollywood is about making memorable and breath taking products. Hollywood is about making money.[/QUOTE] true and false. yeah they put a lot of special effects and fancy colors in movies to attract people but behind every great movie there is always a great story. they would never invest millions in a new movie if the story wasn't original, great, breath taking or memorable as i say. this just doesn't compare to the games where i feel the scenario was made by high schoolers anyway let's go back to the post about the year 1997 being old : being in the computer industry where the chips are supposed to double their power, i think 1997 is quite old. the games nowdays cannot just be compared to (at all) to the games made 7 years ago. quote: proof that emphasizing gameplay works : blizzard these guys prefer to make a game with a perfect gameplay, true story and a great ambiance. and they are not afraid to release it monthS later. i remember they had the capacity to make warcraft 3 full 3d with full camera control for the gamer and they just dropped it. they also have 5 races at the beginning and they dropped it because it was too much elements for the gamers and didn't bring nothing worthwile for the gaming experience. did they sell the games ? yeah, sure i think they are among the best selling studios out there. they sell their copies with a minimum of 3 millions copies each. and they still do. gameplay&story is also important because it builds fidelity. i tried one day warcraft2. it made such an impression on me that i just had to buy diablo and warcraft 3 when they got out, knowing i'll get qaulity games with great story. there are millions of gamers who behaves like me out there. bottom point is i think a game designer should focus on the story & ambiance & gamplay first then choose graphics technology. yeah, and of course you can make compelling graphics in the process, but let's just say it would be the icing on the cake.