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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

m4d3c1ips3

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  1. Quote:Original post by Elmo Song And not only so, from a business point of view, there's not guarantee that a "good" game play sells, as it's more like a personally view That's true enough. A lot of the best games (in my opinion) haven't been the best sellers. I just played Grim Fandango for the first time today, and from what I hear it's sales wern't that great. Ditto Earthbound.
  2. I had hoped in posting this here that designers of the future will read it over, and take (at least some of it) seriously. If the designers of the future got back to core gameplay and creating unique, fun games, rather than graphics fluff, it would be a great thing. Games can only get so real before they need something else to market about the next hot game. I'm not saying I dislike intense graphics, but if you gave me a copy of Super Metroid, Final Fantasy VII, or Fallout, I would play those before I would play Metroid Prime, Final Fantasy XI or Everquest 2.
  3. I wasn't exactly talking about the future of the hardware, I meant the future of gameplay, the graphics-centric mindset of the industry now, what they SHOULD be doing with games, vs what they ARE doing. That kind of thing.
  4. Hey everyone, I just read this rather interesting piece on the future of gaming, I don't know if anyone has seen this. At any rate, I realized that a lot of the things they talk about in this are directions I'd like to see the future of gaming head in. Games are becoming far too corporate and the entire industry seems to be spiraling into an interactive Hollywood where they feed us the same crap over and over (e.g. WWII games.) Well, reading this, I thought about Gamedev, and how (I hope) most of the future's game designers and developers will have probably visited this site at one time or another. I wanted to share this with you, and I do realize parts of it are meant for comedy, but some things they say do make sense. Give me some feedback on what you all think of this. http://www.pointlesswasteoftime.com/games/manifesto.html ~Alex (If this is in the wrong forum, sorry.)
  5. Oh dear mother of God... That was one of the more intense things I've ever seen. What are some other non-pro people's times? Post 'em up.
  6. Ah the time is upon us again. The time of year when E3 comes to town, and we all giggle excitedly over the new hype they cram down our throats. I usually tire of the constant diatribes between the console elitists quickly. So in an effort to detach myself from all the bulls**t news E3 is spewing out, I busted out my old friend: The Super Nintendo. Now I won't go into why I think the SNES is the best console of all time, but suffice to say, one of the reasons was that it had the hugely awesome Super Metroid. I have fond memories of playing Super Metroid with my dad when it first came out. He beat it in 10 hours, I beat it in 6. Last summer, I played it again, and was able to complete the game in something to the order of 1 hour 47 minutes (without 100% completion). Now, I'm playing it again, and it's got me wondering. What is everyone's personal best time on this game? What's the world's best time? I think my time is pretty damn good considering no one I've talked to at school has made a better one, so I submit that everyone post their best times in two categories: 100% Completion Time: Non-100% Completion Time (With % Completed): So go ahead and post, I'm interested to see how fast you all are.
  7. Quote:Original post by Oluseyi GameDev.net can't be everything, even if it wanted to. Aha, I was confused. I always thought GameDev was about people making games, from concept to finnish. While I know there are resources here to help in every regard, it seems that either artists don't come here often, or the site itself is geared more toward programmers. It would make sense to visit other forums for more art-specific things, however I thought GameDev wanted to be a consolidated place for all things game-related. I suppose it could still accomplish this, however we'd need more members from every community. Thanks for your replies everyone! ~Alex
  8. So I'm looking at the forums here on Gamedev, and as I read the titles to myself, it gets me wondering. There are 12 or so forums for programmers, the "technical" side, as it were. There is one forum for game art. Somehow to me, this seems a little unbalanced. I understand that perhaps a large chunk of the community here is programmers, however, I think that there could be sub-forums for the graphical area (e.g. 3D, 2D, animation, concept/character art, etc.) The only downside to this that I see is that the graphics forums move slow enough already. Anyone have any opinion on this? ~Alex P.S. Forgive me if I'm overstepping any proverbial bounds by questioning the high supreme rulers of GD.
  9. This is why I try not to bash the newest hottest thing. Usually, I'll say something along the lines of "DOOM3 LOOKS good....but..." and before I know it, there's some hardcore DOOM fan screaming at me that DOOM3 is the best thing since the wheel. HALO 2 disappointed me, pure and simple. I understand that in the case of legendary mode, you need to "think ahead" and "use skill", however, if I wanted those things in an FPS, I could buy a Rainbow Six title. I could make a FPS, and make it so that all the enemies kill you in three shots. Am I really adding any gameplay? I predict we'll all be having this same conversation when "HALO 10: The Last Ring, We Swear" is released.
  10. Quote:Original post by Eelco Quote:Original post by Alpha_ProgDes Quote:Original post by superpig The only conclusion I can draw is that you have screwed up ideas of what's good in a game, because I found most of the changes to the weapons to be positive, while the levels remained bland and uninspired. you're crazy [smile] a) the game was short i dont know what dimension you live in, but you clearly didnt play it on legendary. Making a game harder to increase length is just bad design. I played on normal and beat the game in a week, 2-3 hours a day after school. They should have added more content to stretch the game to a reasonable length when played on the most common difficulty. I like to think of it like this: when a game has difficulty modes, normal is always the difficulty the game is meant to be played on, if the game on normal sucks, the game sucks. Making it harder doesn't cover up the design flaws in the game. I could just be spoiled because I grew up in the SNES age, where it took you 100+ hours to beat a Final Fantasy game. Even the original Half Life took a while to beat. I could rant about how game designers are becoming lazier and lazier, cutting gameplay time down every year, but I won't. Quote:Original post by Alpha_ProgDes ow the hell did that orb survive the blast and make it to the second ring? Of course, no explanation behind that. I was also confused by the reapperance of 343 Guilty Spark. If the only way to understand how it's back is to beat the original game on Legendary, that's horrible design.
  11. And only $600+? What a deal!
  12. If you're using max, under the maps section, add a raytrace map to the reflection map slot, set it at 100, and you should be on your way.
  13. I might be interested. PM me with some details. Also, try putting this under the "Help Wanted" forum...
  14. This sounds like it doesn't apply to any third party clients like Trillian, which is superior to AIM anyway.
  15. Yngwie Malmsteen (though he's more 80s, he had some early 90s work.) AC/DC (did they do 90's work? Oh well, they're still good.) Stevie Ray Vaughan (He's more blues, but he has some rock-ey sounds.) Also Jimi Hendrix (So what he's 60's? He still rocks harder than all the groups on this list combined.)