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ToppDog

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About ToppDog

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  1. Possibility for a true Metaverse world.

    When I said "Multiverse" I am referring to the company that is creating the engine & tools to create MMO's with... And, when I was referring to Microsoft, I was referring to the fact that they want to create software packages to create games with. I was not referring to the "Metaverse" described in the original post. I never proposed developing futuristic VR technology simply to shop from home with. I am only contesting the point that many of you are making – that advertising in a virtual world is a waste of time. Because, in my opinion, a virtual world (set in a modern day environment) is the one and only place that advertising is ever going to make any significant impact in the gaming world. The original poster didn't ask if exactly replicating the Metaverse was possible, he asked if similar concepts from it could be achieved using todays technology... and the answer is yes.
  2. Possibility for a true Metaverse world.

    Tell that to Multiverse, Microsoft, Second Life, & just about every corporation who has either already payed to have their products advertised or is looking for ways to have their products advertised in games in the future. If it's so impractical, why are all the big boys still trying to find ways to do it? Obviously they think differently. It will be done, & it is already being done in one form or another... it's only a matter of time before this kind of idea sees daylight.
  3. Possibility for a true Metaverse world.

    Why would they? Well, the first reason is the same as why they already play in online virtual worlds -- the community. The second reason is for the free or less costly games that will be the result of both the advertising revenues & the lowered costs of game developement due to using the assets & tools of the metaworlds game engine. I have been predicting exactly this for several years now, & we will see it in the not so distant future. My concept differs from the original poster's in a few regards, & basically changes what Second Life is doing wrong. I can't write it all down right now as I'm at work, but it's definately do-able, even with today's technology, & would definately answer everyones "Why would they? questions.
  4. MMORPG

    Weapons should be the usual fare. What is missing in futuristic MMO's is the seamless transitions between 1st/3rd & vehicular/flight/space sim style gaming. If you think of how large the maps need to be to achieve this, then you will realize that anything in any of today's MMO's is way too small. Any futuristic MMO that wants to break apart from the usual needs to incorporate this. Seeing the video of the Spore demo makes something like this promising in the near future.
  5. Grouping should only be required where it makes sense. Should it take 10 - 20 guys to kill Godzilla? Yeah! Should it take the same 10 - 20 guys to kill a pissed off badger? No!
  6. I agree with the last poster. Make the game more generic, but with similar concepts that could then be modded by the player community.
  7. A petty issue

    For a more realistic look, I would offer both 1st & 3rd person perspectives, with the ability to zoom in between them. Zooming from 3rd to 1st would move the camera position between the eyes, with the head becoming invisible. You could add a tactical mode where the char holds his weapon at the ready, which would put the weapon in view of the player, but in a more realistic manner since you are actually using the proper camera angle along with the actual character animations that another player could observe in 3rd person. This would also enable the player to look around & see the characters body, which adds to the realism without any extra programming.
  8. Okay, I agree & disagree with the original post. I do like customization & non-linear gameplay, but only in the proper circumstances. If I am playing a game that tells me a story, then by God I want them to give me the "ONE" ending that the story is supposed to have. I'm paying them to tell me a story, not to make up my own. It may be okay to take some non-linear paths to the ending, but all roads should lead to Rome! It is especially annoying to play a sequel to a game that had alternate endings, & not be able to start the sequel based on the ending you chose in last game. But, if it's an MMO or open-ended RPG type of game, then I don't mind the customization or the lack of linear content. But, I do agree with how it can be a pain to try to figure out how to create a character & choose all the proper powers or skills etc, when you've never had the opportunity to try them out to see how they work. Scrapping chars & starting over again just to get a minor detail changed is just bad for business. Players should be allowed to make any adjustments to the same char if they wish, as long as it doesn't adversely effect gameplay.
  9. Best Engine For Massive Maps ???

    Thanks for the tips. That real-time procedural universe looks awesome BTW. I did get a chance to see the new Torque shader engine demo at an expo recently, & it does look very promising.
  10. Anyone know if there are any 3rd party engines (Torque, etc.) that can be used to create really large maps... large enough for realistic space or flight sims that incorporate 1st/3rd style FPS/RPG avatars? Something along the lines of the map sizes in The last couple GTA games or MMO's like WOW or SWG... but where the maps can be about 10 times larger etc.
  11. Role-Playing Secret: Screw Immersion!

    I like the idea... kind of. As some others have mentioned, I would still want to have control over what my character does while playing manually, but I think it would be neat to have a menu where you could choose these type of actions/emotes to be performed in sort of an auto-pilot or AFK mode if you wanted. Another thing to add in that would also promote RP'ing your chars is givving NPC's a memory system & allow them to have programmed personalities as well, so that they can respond to the players actions/emotes based both on their own built in personalities & their prior dealings with each player char.
  12. Virtual Reality

    I doubt full blown VR will take off until you can step into your own holodeck or “jack in” matrix style, but I do think VR goggles or helmets will become more common… especially as the game genres continue to blur. We’re seeing an increase of, & a higher demand for hybrid games that blend the gameplay styles of FPS, vehicle/mech, & flight/space sims into the same gameworlds, such as the GTA series, BF 1942 I & II, HalfLife2, or various MMO’s, etc. As these games get better at being true representations of each genre within single gameworlds, developers are most likely going to try & incorporate support for the multiple input devices that the players of these genres like to use. This may also result in cross-over use of input devices to play these games that haven’t seen much use before, such as using a HOTAS setup with a VR headset for FPS style gameplay, etc. What’s most likely holding VR headsets from taking off is poor design & the inability to offer true 1024 x 768 resolution at a reasonable price. I know I’m not willing to pay the prices they are asking for when all they can offer is sub-par resolutions without even incorporating headphones/microphones or 6 degrees of movement with the head-tracking. The ideal VR headset should, at a minimum, offer resolutions comparable to 1024 x 768, be able to be worn over glasses, have built in headphones & microphone, & offer 6DOF head-tracking. If I were designing it I would also incorporate some other features that seem to have been neglected: 1. The viewscreens would be more widescreen-like to allow for peripheral vision & the ability to look left/right while turning your head left/right, since this is how you naturally look left/right anyway. This may help eliminate some of the motion sickness not related to latency that occurs from constantly looking straight ahead into small viewscreens while turning your head. 2. The viewscreens would be designed so that you could easily peer underneath them for easy viewing of things like keyboards etc. DURING gameplay. Since you always have sight of the real world as well as what’s on the viewscreens, this may also help with the motion sickness issue, as well as just being a good general safety feature. 3. If what’s holding back higher resolutions is being able to make screens with small enough pixels, then I would design the headset so that it uses slightly larger screens (which are already available & cheap), place those screens elsewhere on the headset (such as the top of the head) & use a mirror/lens system to project the image to the eyes. All the technology exists to make this happen. Someone just needs to put it all together correctly & affordably. [Edited by - ToppDog on August 17, 2005 4:36:26 PM]
  13. why not hide the numbers?

    Why can't we have both ??? It's a given that numbers drive all games in one form or another, and that will never change. Hardcore RPG fans like the number/stat systems they are used to, from as far back as paper RPG's... & hardcore video gamers like seeing & hearing the visual & audible animations & effects that are representations of the same numbers behind the scenes. So, why not design the games to incorporate the animations for the video crowd & also provide the number/stat systems for the RPG crowd, with an in-game menu option to toggle them on/off or customize them to your liking? This is already being done in in part by some of the bigger MMO's, & it's not too hard to do. It may be a little extra work for the devs to create the extra content to satisfy the video crowd. But by doing so they will not only attract a greater number of players, but it will also make the game more immersive for the hardcore RPG'ers. It's a win-win.
  14. FPS or RPG?

    Deus Ex is a good example of FPS style combat mechanics in an RPG game. That is how I would do it. You want to take the best from both genres, not the worst... so I would not try to include RPG style combat in an FPS style game. That would be including the worst of both genres. The best thing FPS's offer is fast paced skill based combat where the players decide what happens by their own abilities, instead of the computer rolling the dice & spitting out random results. The best things RPG's offer that are usually non-existant in your average FPS are the detailed character developement & immersive storylines. If you put these aspects together in a single game it should be very promising.
  15. The biggest problem is that in the end they are nothing other than chat rooms with pretty graphics & endless tasks thrown in to keep you from ever leaving. MMO's have the potential to revolutionize gaming as we know it, but in order for this to happen their developers have to get out of their turn-based paper RPG mindsets & think outside the box. Done properly, MMO's could go beyond being "the game" for the minority of players that like the current MMO systems, & could also be a lobby of sorts where gamers of every single genre hang out & meet up to play every type of game imaginable that has been designed to blend in with that MMO universe. The number one problem with MMO's is that they aren't being designed to keep players there by making it so much fun that they don't want to leave, but instead are designed to keep players there by making it take forever to accomplish anything. They're losing millions of potential gamers in order to keep the few who are willing to stick around with this practice.
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