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Rambo_Bill

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  1. You could get the Bin Laden family to invest in you. It worked for Bush to the tune of 1.4 Billion Dollars. Just tell them you'll learn to make them a nuclear bomb and deliver it to them upon graduation.
  2. Bulma, interesting code. For some reason I have never got the clone method to work, so I ended up with storing wave file data in streams. Although more complicated this gives me some flexibility as to when to load data into memory or keep it in a file. My questions: 1. Does the clone method copy all the data too? If so, is that not a waste? 2. When you create a new secondarybuffer with specifying a filename, does it load all the data at that point or does it only buffer it from a file? If it always loads the entire wave into memory, would that not use alot of memory if large waves were stored in memory all the time? Finally, I just like to say thank you for sharing your code. It's good to see some real examples.
  3. If you want working examples of: Direct3D (So far, only 2D) DirectInput (Mouse,Keyboard) DirectSound (ability to play multiple wave files simultaneosly) All packaged into a game libray, check out my free opensource Game Library at monsterapi.sourceforge.net Let me know what you think of it. Oh, and I'm always looking for help improving it too. -- Bill
  4. Cool, after hearing Raloths reasons, I think Managed DirectX Rocks. 1. Sound Doesn't matter 2. Documentation will someday come in the far far distant future (Or atleast thats what my crystall ball is telling me) 3. Soon, the entire operating system will be undocumented just like Managed DirectX. Count me in, Raloth....
  5. I have a three cons for you, assuming your talking about using Managed DirectX for your games: 1. No real-world working DirectSound examples. 2. Little to no documentation, and much of the documentation thats there is either incorrect or outddated. 3. The company that created it could care less, they are more interested in something called longhorn.
  6. This is the error <error> An unhandled exception of type 'Microsoft.DirectX.DirectSound.InvalidCallException' occurred in microsoft.directx.directsound.dll Additional information: Error in the application. </error> Is there another way I should be copying sounds? Basically, what I want to end up with is a streaming sound system for use in games. One that is suitable to play multiple sounds with little delay. Possibly streaming larger sounds from files even, but for now I'd settle with be able to do it all in memory, as long as it works. I have not seen a single working example of this anywhere. Oh, and I want it to be using the latest managed directsound, not DirectSound3,fmod,nbass,sdl or some other third party library I failed to mention.
  7. Jay the set command is obsolete in .NET. If you put it in, the IDE automatically removes it. Try again.
  8. Below is code that generates an error. aSound is a for real initialized Secondarybuffer and if I do asound.play it works. What is the purpose of clone if it does not ever work? ok, now the code: <code> Friend Sub PlaySoundBuffer(ByRef aSound As SecondaryBuffer, ByVal iLoop As Integer) Dim bSound As SecondaryBuffer bSound = aSound.Clone(oDev) </code> So, why does the last line get an error. Yes oDev is properly initialized device.
  9. preferably something that could be used to load and play sounds for games?
  10. Raloth, so how would I programmatically get the real size and not the scaled up size? I can do it by loading the image a second time into the DOTNETS standard image object, but there should be a way to get that info through directX.
  11. Well, as I understand it mip mapping has to do with generating smaller versions of a texture through a filter. For instance, When taking something that was once represented by 16 pixels and now is viewed at a distance and is represented by a single pixel some computation is required to figure out the best color to use for that pixel. So, If we have a base image that is 64x64 in size, the lower levels of detail will be 32x32, 16x16, 8x8, 4x4, 2x2 and 1x1. so, it is most efficient to use an image that is a power of 2; however, you can round up,as DirectX appareantly does automitically, but it's a bit wastefull. I'm not so concerned about this waste in certain circumstances. So as I originally stated, I would like to be able to get the original height of the image loaded without having to load it into a image control. PS: Did you download my source? Critism, comments, opinion are all welcomed.
  12. Why is it incorrect? It works great texturing this image on a flat surface that is 147 pixels high, but I have to get the 147 height from other sources.. I understand powers of 2 would be more efficient, and thats all well and good, But sometimes I might want to just load a single image and texture it on an object that is 147 pixels high. Actaully, another reason to be able to get the height of the loaded image would be so that you know it's not a power of 2, then you could take measures to rectify that. Possibly, dividing it up into smaller images that are powers of 2, then using all the smaller images to draw an image of 147 or 169, if using a power of 2. Another option would be to make large textures then paste images onto them, still getting the height when you load the image would be helpfull in this matter. In general are you better off having several small textures or a few large ones? If you wish to see the source code: http://sourceforge.net/project/showfiles.php?group_id=113730
  13. <code> Dim aImage As Direct3D.Texture aImage = TextureLoader.FromFile(oDev, "C:\a.bmp") Debug.Write(aImage.GetLevelDescription(0).Height() & vbCrLf) </code> This returns 256 even though the image loaded is 147 pixels high, I want to get the 147. I can get it by loading the image into an image object, but I'd prefer only loading the image once and geting the information through DirectX.
  14. All the examples in the SDK load a single file and play it, But what is the best/proper way to play multiple sounds at the same time. I think you could probably load multiple secondarybuffers and play them, but if you want to play the same sound while it's already playing, you shouldn't have to load it again... hmm, anyway, any examples of using the sound buffers would be appreciated. I prefer VBNET code snippets, but can deal with C#. Thanks, Bill