Ksero

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About Ksero

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  1. Communist Swedes?

    I can't find any good English sources on the matter (usually thelocal.se has pretty good coverage on our part of the world). It has been covered pretty extensively in our Swedish media (all of whom were critical to the actions of the county government). This is what happened. The Norrbotten county theater was doing some project on gender equality (funded by the county). As a part of that project they were writing a book. When the county officials heard that they wanted to have an interview with that scientist, Annica Dahlström in the book, they threatened to cut the funding for the project. The book/text was never banned. I'm not particularly proud of that side of the feminist-left wing in Sweden, but I would like to compare this to how e.g. the U.S. has cut funding for programs advocating condom use, instead focusing on promoting abstinence (critical article). This all happened about two years ago, and since the memory of the media rivals that of the average goldfish, I can't find any coverage of how the issue was resolved (not that I googled *that* hard). EDIT: minor clarification [Edited by - Ksero on January 17, 2007 3:52:34 AM]
  2. Wow, never realized qwerty was this annoying

    Quote:Original post by AnonymousPosterChild So basically you settled for a keyboard that just creates new, magical problem areas? The fact that Colemak is not perfect does not imply that it's not better than Dvorak. Sure there are problem areas. But they aren't as common as Dvorak's problem areas. In Dvorak, the common digraphs "gh", "ct", "rn", "up" and "pi" are all written with single fingers (eg. gh --> right index finger), which is slow. In Colemak, some of the more troublesome digraphs to write are "za", "kn", "ue", "nl" and "nk". I'm afraid I couldn't find a listing of the frequency distribution of less common English digraphs, so this isn't much of an argument (the best I could find was this). However, comparing digraph frequencies is a poor measure of a layout's merit. Head over to the compare page and see some more thorough statistics.
  3. Wow, never realized qwerty was this annoying

    Come on! Dvorak was made in the 1930s. Use something more modern! Like Colemak (what's wrong with dvorak?, other alternate layouts) I also like the idea of the Arensito programming layout, using the alt-gr button to access an alternate layout with frequently used special symbols (especially since the Swedish qwerty-layout already uses things like alt-gr + 0 for ending curly braces. If you already require a chordic combination, why not make the secondary character easy to reach? And even if you don't want learn a new keyboard layout, please consider mapping backspace to your caps lock button. Just how often do you erase characters? How often do you use caps lock? Which button is closest and easiest to use without moving your fingers from the home row? While we're talking special keyboard layouts, one thing I've been wanting to try is Maltron keyboards, the keyboard that unleashes the power of your thumbs (they can do more than just push the space button). However, they're a bit on the expensive side and I'm a bit hesitant to order one over the Internet without getting a chance to try it out... So I've settled for MS Natural Ergonomic Keyboard 4000. For the interested reader, there's also TypeMatrix and Datahand
  4. 911 Conspiracy

    Please see this page for further information
  5. The Fireweed That Can't Be Smoked

    Quote:Original post by abstractimmersion I don't remember where I heard that about hamburger, but if we're talking about a mass-produced agricultural-to-consumer protein, I can't think of much that would stand up to it. It's more efficient than tofu, at any rate. There maybe possible alternatives, but I'm not sure what they would be. No. It really is quite simple. For every step up the food chain, 90 % of the energy transferred is lost in metabolic processes (roughly speaking). To grow crops for feeding cows that we then eat can never be as efficient as cutting out the middle man and eating those crops ourselves. In the area required for raising beef for one family, we could raise crops to feed ten families. For further reading, see the paragraph about the Pyramid of Energy. Oh, and regarding the Amazon... Soy and Sugar Lead Brazil's 17% Agribusiness Growth .
  6. The Fireweed That Can't Be Smoked

    Quote:Original post by owl In the world we live, for a solution to be plausible, it needs to be profitable. If I was a sonovabitch and I sold fish, I wouldn't care about 90% of them diying if the prices are going to be higher. Only when the last tree has died and the last river been poisoned and the last fish been caught will we realise that we cannot eat money. ~Cree Indian Proverb While we are trading links, I'd like to invite you all to calculate your ecological footprint. How many planets would be needed if everyone lived like you? You should also watch Dr. Albert Bartlett's lecture on how your life will be influenced by the exponential function.
  7. Gifts for international hosts

    Barbecues are something you Americans do really well! Bring a few bottles of a really good American barbecue sauce! :)
  8. Amplifier Modelling

    Just what do you mean by "a 2D table of voltage-maps"? At first I thought it was a simple float value for every frequency and gain setting, how much the input sine wave was amplified. But then you write "a voltage-map can be created to emulate the distortion at a particular gain" which seems to indicate more than just the gain (maybe the spectrum of harmonic and non-harmonic overtones arising from a particular input sinus?) In programmatic: what datatype is a voltage-map? ;)
  9. sorting/grouping by rows in Excel

    Select the entire table (4 rows x 3 columns), hit data|sort and click that you have headers in your table. Choose how you want to sort and... voila! (note: this behaviour varies slightly across different versions of Excel)
  10. the USD

    Quote:Original post by LessBread Venezeula switching to Euros would be a bigger hit than Iran as the US gets 10% of it's oil from there and none from Iran. In general though, this is a bit of a real time economics experiment. What happens when an oil producing country switches a different petrocurrency? It's never really happened before. Actually, Iran has been accepting euro as payment for EU and ACU customers since mid-2003 [William Clark], but the prices have still been denominated in dollars (which would probably change if/when the Iranian oil bourse launches). Also, Iraq was selling its oil for euros during the oil-for-food program [CNN], amounting to about 5 % of world exports. After the US occupation, Iraqi oil is once again traded for dollars. It's happened before. And the existing bourses in NY and London won't be shutting down anytime soon. Any reduction of the dollar's role in the world economy will be a gradual process.
  11. relative camera orientation via least squares

    Oh, you also need to expand the matrix with four times as many columns... like this (scroll down for the new parts) EDIT: oops... almost forgot to upload the new page... now it's there [Edited by - Ksero on May 12, 2006 11:52:29 AM]
  12. Solving Math (cross multiply) equation....

    linear interpolation (a - 0.2) will be a number between 0 and 1.9 u = (a - 0.2) / (2.1 - 0.2) will be a number between 0 and 1. let's call it u. u * (32.58 - (-2.26)) = u * (32.58 + 2.26) will be a number between 0 and (32.58 + 2.26) u * (32.58 - (-2.26)) + (-2.26) will be a number between -2.26 and 32.58 so to summarize, take: (a - 0.2)*(32.58 - (-2.26))/(2.1 - 0.2) + (- 2.26)
  13. relative camera orientation via least squares

    Quote:Original post by logularjason Probably a silly question, but why do you pre-multiply both sides by A^T? Oh, the A^T is how I learnt to solve systems with least-squares... pre-multiply and then solve the resulting, square matrix. But maybe that SVD algorithm does it in another, smarter way. Quote: Also, redarding your comment about adapting the solver, I was hoping to simply apply the same form of this system of equations, but with four times the number of rows. i.e. one row each for the unit-quaternion parameters. I figure this is OK, since these parameters are independent. Is this what you meant? Ah, right... originally I thought you would code a matrix-class with quaternions as elements. And then an equation solver that could work with these quaternion matrixes... But your way sidesteps that problem by using a regular old matrix. Can't see why that wouldn't work. Good luck with your project... What are you building? :)
  14. relative camera orientation via least squares

    Since the forum doesn't have much support for writing mathematical formulae, I uploaded my thoughts here
  15. relative camera orientation via least squares

    You can't solve all the absolute orientations given only the relative orientations. Those relative rotations between the cameras would be unchanged if you rotated all the cameras by a small angle around an arbitrary axis. Therefore there is no unambiguous solution to the problem. So will you be using one camera that is 'known' / the 'reference' camera...? Then the obvious way would just be to calculate all other camera orientations from this reference camera. Or are you thinking that by calculating their orientations in several ways ( ie. C0 is 'known' C1 = C0 * R01 C2 = C1 * R12 = C0 * R01 * R12 C2 = C0 * R02 Two ways of calculating C2 ) you can gain additional precision, utilising the additional information (R12 in the example)? Are you wondering how you should weigh together the diffent ways of calculating the orientations?