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CataclysmicKnight

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About CataclysmicKnight

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  1. Well, I use Flash, so the code won't be the same, but the idea behind it should be: function UpdatePlayerHP() { HPText = player.HP + "/" + player.maxHP; if(player.HP > 0) { MCHPBar.MCHPBarInternal._width = MCHPBarMaxWidth * (player.HP / player.maxHP); } else { MCHPBar.MCHPBarInternal._width = 0; } } For some reason it hides the plus signs on either side of the "/", but it should work out :) Basically, the internal bar width is always equal width to the max width times the percentage of life left.
  2. CataclysmicKnight

    [4e5]Discuss: Emblem

    The unifying force here seems to be: a single symbol needs to be prevalent. A symbol is not necessarily graphical (sounds/melodies) - which sounds to me like the Mario or Zelda theme, where no matter where you hear it, even if it's redone, there's no way you can escape knowing what it is. Technically, the emblem reminds me entirely of branding (wikipedia's definition): In marketing, a brand is the symbolic embodiment of all the information connected with a product or service. A brand typically includes a name, logo, and other visual elements such as images or symbols. It also encompasses the set of expectations associated with a product or service which typicaly arise in the minds of people. Such people include employees of the brand owner, people involved with distribution, sale or supply of the product or service, and ultimate consumers. When you play Half-Life as used for an example, seeing that symbol just made you know what was going on (okay, safe place here), and if you see a mushroom with a smiley face on it, you know it's Mario's, regardless of if the name is there. So if a symbol becomes strong enough that after playing, one sees a symbol and goes "Oh yeah, that's what Super Happy Awesome Game Time was about", sounds like the nail is, well, nailed.
  3. CataclysmicKnight

    Hazy Boundries...

    Oh yes, definitely planned on using them all fully. I just worried that because other elements were included (such as the aliens), then they did not take up enough of the game (more like 75% instead of the entirety). Thanks for all the answers :)
  4. CataclysmicKnight

    Share your idea

    I'm fighting between two right now, and actually as I'm not too strong on programming, I'm using an engine (Games Factory), so I might finish both in time. First Idea: 1. The Adventures of Captain [dorky name here] 2. Action/Adventure 3. Robots and Pirates 4. 2D 5. Gameplay includes adventure in the style of riding around in a boat, collecting upgrades (kind of like Need for Speed meets pirate ships), and then fighting on land in top-down camera view, reminiscent of Secret of Mana. 6. The pirate heroes themselves are all nerdy, and the robot of the game is your character - a "bad ass" created to help fight the evil pirates, along with your nerdy shipmates. Second Idea: 1. Revenge of the Stereotypes 2. Arcade 3. Robots, Pirates and Ninjas 4. 2D 5. Based on Robotron (my favorite arcade game), except in different "worlds". Each consists of a different stereotype, and your goal is to shoot them all down! 6. Fast-paced retro-style action!
  5. CataclysmicKnight

    Hazy Boundries...

    Another question, not sure of the answer, wanted to be certain: How independant do the elements have to be? Say you had robots fighting all types of monsters, including all the others - the pirates, ninjas and zombies - as well as other things, such as aliens, neanderthals, hippies and whatever else. Would the elements still count as in use, or just the Robot, since the other elements aren't a majority of the game? (The idea is to have a robot fighting all the video game stereotypes, and our four elements are all big parts of it).
  6. CataclysmicKnight

    Just let them play!!

    I very much agree. If we're talking games in general, I hate nothing more than a huge punishment, or even having to restart the game, after death. My biggest complaint, actually, isn't about death, but the way saving is handled - Mario Pinball Land as an example - if the game shuts off without saving, you must entirely restart! Similarly, if you get sent to a save point after death, it ruins things. Suddenly you're not in the game anymore. It kills the sense of actually being in the game. Finally, I'm not sure what the exact fix is. Generally, the perfect fix is something that injures what you want the most. In the pinball game, you lose your score. In a game like Diablo, you lose your items (what you try so hard to earn and find). So, depending on what the player wants most, they should be effected there.
  7. CataclysmicKnight

    C++ first so bad???

    I think the main reason people don't suggest starting with C++ is that it relies much more on actually cleaning up memory and releasing system resources. Also, other languages, such as BASIC and HTML, are generally easier to use. I'm a major fan of Flash Actionscript, it's as simple as BASIC with much more power (even if it's much slower). However, I too started with C++, and C++ teaches you a LOT of good programming methods. And if you start higher with C++, the other languages are easier (like learning Latin and then French).
  8. CataclysmicKnight

    The Name Thing

    Gonna have to agree with the "difficulty to pronounce" rule here. I've gone whole books/games/etc. pronouncing a name totally wrong just because it's easier and faster. This would totally slaughter the purpose behind taking so long to pick the perfect name. Also, I go with the baby name/meaning rule here. I guess it's a mixture there - I take the description of a character/place/etc and look it up in a baby name meaning dictionary. Usually one name strikes me, or you can always modify one a bit. And finally, to go way back to the original post - my main problem is that the game I'm working on now is a sim-type with a BUNCH of items. The difficulty is coming up with the item names and descriptions, especially in a small space. This can be just as challenging/rewarding as a character name.
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