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Richy2k

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  1. Contractually I'm 37.5 hours a week. On average it's probably a lot more hours due to working over time. Some weeks as high as 70 hours, most sit at around 37.5 for me.
  2. Quote:Original post by dorix You have chromatophores. You represent the next step in human evolution. See Darwin's Radio. I some how doubt it [wink], given that it only started happening after a rather intrusive grinding down of my nose! But fun to imagine. In reference to the book, I may have to put that on my list of books to read.
  3. Quote:Original post by Sneftel Like this? Isolated to a small area on the bridge of my nose, and not short term either. Stays like that for hours. It doesn't happen if I just feel a bit nervous (I sweat, like most in that case) - it's if my general mood is "ARGH! So much to do, no time to do it, X is worrying me, what will I do about Y...".
  4. I apologise ahead of time if this post sounds insanely stupid, but I noticed something a while ago which, honestly, is probably just pure coincidence. I had a nose operation a fair few years ago, and after I'd fully recovered, on the bridge of my nose between my eyes there was a slight discolouration of the skin. Nothing bad at all. The interesting thing is that this area of skin seems to change colour with my mood - going from barely visible to an obvious red. When at it's reddest, that's when I'm the most stressed out or anxious about something. My best guess is this is probably down to heart rate and blood pressure, but either way I find it pretty funny. Puts a bit of a smile on my face if I'm feeling like the weight of the world is on my shoulders - and it's red, and when I've had a good day at work and it's not visible. [grin] Any one else have any peculiarities about themselves? Perhaps even just some "tells" which allow others to read you?
  5. Ok, I shall avoid singletons. I do hate them - but if it were a "best practice" in a language I would be happy to put my hatred of them aside. Access to the engine can wait, but I'll go with having a single interface class - use that to access core elements. Not that I'm new to programming or have no idea how to do thing - I just want to take some other people's opinions, views, and not have a messy start with C# - as I refuse to rewrite another framework in the coming months. [Edited by - Richy2k on February 19, 2010 4:38:20 PM]
  6. Quote:Original post by jpetrie The last option: pass the dependency interfaces to the interfaces depending on them. That's what sort of thing I had in mind when I was thinking "1 place to get access to the subsystems". It's been suggested I just use singletons, I can't really argue as to whether it's bad practice or not due to it being a language I can "cut code" in, but not really familiar with. You think singletons would be ok? I.e. I just use them, and get on with actually writing a framework and a game?
  7. Decided it's time I properly get acquainted with C#. Plan on finding another job outside of games, and C# seems to be a popular choice to program with. Thus, I've decided to have a go at making a small game with XNA to get my C# up to scratch. For my framework, I'm mostly gonna copy my C++ engine's ideas - cutting out the lower level parts due to XNA being higher level. My main problem is access to core systems in my C++ engine looks like this: CsArchive* pArchive = CsCore::pImpl()->requestArchive( "whatever.arc" ); OsInputDevice* pKeybord = OsCore::pImpl()->getInputDevice( osID_KEYBOARD, 0 ); Basically, CsCore, RsCore, SsCore, OsCore, and GsCore are all similar to singletons - but could have a different version of them dropped in even at run time. I am happy to drop that part of them for my XNA framework, but what would you guys recommend I use? Static class? Singleton? Have 1 place to get access to all of these subsystems? Something different? Cheers ahead of time!
  8. Broke a couple of the keys on one of my older laptops, I just lived without the keys myself, as I'd snapped the mechanism which allowed them to return to their normal position.
  9. IT BURNS Quote:Original post by benryves There are better ways to enjoy Vivaldi. That has made my day!
  10. I don't mind people being offensive, but not if that's truly their intention. By this I mean mocking someone for their use of a grenade instead of shooting is fine, as long as it's just in jest, good fun. I don't play MW or MW2 because I don't like playing against people who are offensively competitive. I have noticed that the less people you play against, the more fun it becomes. In games like Left 4 Dead, it's coop, but obviously a poor player can drag you back - but it's a smaller team, tighter, and more fun. Playing RTS games 2-4 players, much more fun, even against highly competitive players. People complaining about FFXIII being linear? Aren't they all linear? I've just finished playing through FFVI through to X on a, currently, 4-5 month long FF binge. VI-IX are linear stories with sidequests available most of the way through. X, totally linear progression till the end with a story to make it work - but it, at least for me, made the side quests all the more fun, and much more rewarding (Was going for 10 of every monster on the capture quest, defeating all Dark Aeons (done 2), and gathering + powering up all celestial weapons (got 2)...but ended up putting more hours in that than the rest of the game and just decided to get the game over with). Itching to play FFXIII in the hope that it is like that [smile]
  11. Quote:Original post by samoth Quote:Original post by Richy2k That sounds like it's either a joke, or something serious.Not a joke at all. I promise you won't laugh if it happens to you. (full details) It's probably not get as far as anyone coming to my door - First letter I would probably ignore due to thinking nothing of it. Second letter would put my on edge, and I think I'd follow up there. If I decided to be stubborn (I am usually a stubborn person) I'd ignore it, and when people started asking questions, I would start complaining - both in personal verbally, and written letters to the appropriate authorities. As I said, for me I don't think I'd let it get that far just because I know the trouble it may cause you. Police/law enforcement prying into your personal life, asking neighbours, work place, friends about you - it does make you look suspicious, and might even cost you your job. However, I'm sure if someone does lose their job through an ordeal like this, they'd be straight on the phone to a solicitor. No I don't think what they were doing was right at all - as you said prove yourself innocent? I don't have a problem with that system really, but that's not the system most of this world's law systems abide by - be consistent. Everyone is entitled to their privacy, something to hide or not, but I do think having DNA/fingerprints of everyone on file is possibly a good thing - since it could actually speed up investigations, at least in my mind it sounds like less hunting around if someone pops up who isn't on the database. As much as I think that, currently, I don't want my DNA or fingerprints on the police database. Knowing they are there would just make me feel like a suspect in something.
  12. Quote:Original post by samoth Not been arrested for it (quite obviously, or I could not write here), but been repeatedly molested and been alleged/slandered of child murder for over half a year, only because I did not follow the Gestapo's police's invite for a so-called "voluntary" mass DNA screening after said crime. That sounds like it's either a joke, or something serious. To be honest, if it wasn't out of my way - I would opt for the "voluntary" mass DNA screening just to rule myself out, so not to attract unwanted attention, and avoid allegations. Not that I'd really *want* to.
  13. Never been arrested, plan to keep it that way too! As much as breaking the law sounds appealing sometimes, I like having a clean record, not losing time to court, not potentially losing out on a job due to a record, and would prefer to stay in my own bed instead of a cell overnight. I have been pulled over by the police a few times in the car - once just because my car looked stolen or uninsured! It's not fun, and makes you feel guilty.
  14. This popped up on my radar a while ago, and has been mentioned a couple of times on the forums recently. So far I've implemented this and it's covered me reasonably well - especially for depth sorting alpha blended objects. Should help reduce switching around your render states, but isn't the be all end all solution.
  15. Quote:Original post by Shinkage Um, I may be missing something, but what you have here doesn't seem to actually be a PIMPL pattern, since you're exposing it publicly. In fact, it seems like what you have here is a singleton by another name. Depends what book you read - but I don't disagree with you. It is more of a singleton implementation than a pimpl as you can't have multiple instances of the same type of class. Rather than wrap the calls (why wrap? wasted programming time), I just decided to expose a pointer to the interface class - NOT the actual implementation. So I suppose if you want to get technical on naming, it's more of a Pinterface [smile]