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disks86

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  1. I operate an opensource project that I thought may be of interest to the folks on this forum. It's a binary compatible implementation of d3d9 over Vulkan. It's still pretty early in the project but there are a handful of d3d9 examples working with it. The details are available on the GitHub wiki.   https://github.com/disks86/VK9/wiki
  2. One problem with a & b is that each zone server would have to be aware of all ajoining zone servers correct? That sounds like a headache waiting to happen. If I were you I would break the servers up like most mmorpg's do my realms, districts, or whatever your choice term would be. Then if they want to switch servers log them out and they can reconnect to the other server using your login logic. As for getting a list of available realms that would be a job for a central server or possibly multiple servers that can be reached using the same dns name. I guess what I'm trying to say is IMHO making each server it's own world is easier than trying to make each server be a part of a world. Also if you need to have each zone/map processed independently I would use a thread. The overhead of spawning a new thread is less than spawning a new process.
  3. So possible but not a good idea got it. That is kind of what I thought but I thought I would check because it would have been cool if it would work. Thanks for the feed back though. I really wish it was easier to make MMORPGs seems like everyone wants to make one but few make it to a usable state but that is another topic for another most thanks again all.
  4. Ok, so here is the low down I had an interesting idea and I wanted to see if anyone has tried it or anything like it. If so will it work and will it be scalable enough for an MMORPG. First off this idea is based off of postgreSQL so if you don't know and can't guess it is a database. Anyway what I was thinking is that you could bypass a traditional server and have a client connect directly to the database. Of course the client would have to access things through procedures to validate input to prevent cheating but as I see it the advantages are as follows. 1.Instance data is in the database so no roll back. (as a user I don't like roll back) 2.The protocol should not need modified to change functionality only query/procedure changes should be required. 3. PostgreSQL allows tables to inherit from one another for targeting could be handled via an EntityID or something of that nature. 4. Information could be sent back to clients via a trigger. On a side note the chat would likely need to be handled by a different server maybe jabber protocol or something. My question is more about speed and scalability but any other constructive comments are welcome.
  5. I programed in vb.net for a long time but have now switched to c++ because I like it. This was probly a bad project to start because of my lack of knowledge of this language but I really wanted to do it. Anyway to the point. Some programmer friends and I started making an rpg engine using c++. We are using SDL for the graphics/sound/input/threading and python for scripting. I was going to use lua but python apears to be better documented. The problem is the battle system. Should I just treat it as a plugin ? If so how should I store the character variables because I don't know what variables there system will use. I also don't know how to do the rendering I don't really want to build api to my rendering functions because the point of this engine is to allow the user to make an rpg without needing to know much programming. The other issue is should I just use the python for my plugins or should I try to figure out how to use .dll files. When I started the project I was just gonna have a static battle system and allow the user to change variable values(stats,etc) via python interface. The problem there is what if they deside they want to use for example D&D rules for combat. They would have to do allot of a hacking to get even close to what they wanted. Oh I almost forgot this is a tile based rpg engine. Please Help!
  6. I never said c# was slow
  7. Hey everyone. I haven't posted on here in a while. I believe that last time was about a .net engine well I'm at it again. This time I'm thinking about using .net (probly vb.net) and SDL. I just found out about the .net library for SDL. I have been playing with it and it looks even easier than DirectX. Anyhow my goal is to create a 2d tile based MMORPG. I would like some pointers. I know there are allot of people that know way more about this then I do. First off let me explain why I'm using vb.net because I'm sure I'll get flamed for that. I like the vb.net syntax and it is cross platform via mono. I was thinking that sdl and vb.net would allow me to create a game that was not only cross platform but cross architecture. I know that if I wrote it in c++ I could just modify the code a little and recompile for a different OS but what about the Operating Systems I don’t know about or don’t support? This way any OS that mono & SDL support can play my game. Oh and hardcore c++ people yes I know c++ is faster. Ok now to the nuts and bolts. On my last engine I used a hash table with byte arrays and a memory stream to form a game file cache. My question is would making a game file cache be worth it? I know .net buffers file streams and hash tables have extra overhead because they only take objects as values thus boxing and unboxing happen allot. If I should cache game files how should I do it? Should I just cache tiles in an array or whole files? In my last engine I used a type of collision detection to check for control click events basically gave the mouse a rectangle variable and use intersects with to check it against the clickable objects on screen. Is this the best way to do it or am I showing my ignorance. In my last engine I used flat text files for scripts. I made my own script reader. It was very simple it delimitated lines of code by a hash symbol at the beginning of each new command. What is the best way to do engine scripting? The engine is going to be for an RPG so the script system will get a workout. I also would like to know if making the engine use plug-ins is worth it. How much overhead will I get from using dynamically loaded libraries? What is the best way to use plug-ins? Does anyone know what the packet size limit is for TCP/IP? I want to know how many characters I can fit in one packet. What is the best way to stop hacking? I was thinking about encrypting the data before sending but I don’t want to slow down the code too much. I know there is no one way to stop hacking it requires client and server side prevention systems and even then there is always a way. I also thought about doing a checksum of sorts by loading a file into a byte array adding the values and checking that with the server’s checksum. Would something like that be worth it or no? What about multithreading, should I use it, If so on what parts? What image format should I use? Last time I used PNG. Well that is about all the questions I can think of right now. I will appreciate any constructive comments. Please keep the anti Microsoft/.net flames to a minimum.
  8. Well the point was to prove that it could be done. Most of the forum posts I have seen have said that it was not possible to use gdi at a usable speed and that the person asking should use directx or directdraw. However GDI is higher level which yes causes some speed loss but also makes it easier to create 2d graphics. I'm making a whole game using gdi in vb.net and it is going quickly and smoothly so far.
  9. Hey I Managed to get Full Screen GDI to render without flicker in vb.net. I had to use the following Back Buffering,Double buffering,bitmap Caching and AllPaintingInWmPaint. It is a 2D game just in case anyone wanted to know. Feel free to ask me any questions you have. I have seen many articles on this subject and I was told I couldn't do it well being the stubborn person I am that just made me try harder. also I should say that it is has an image background with currently 1 sprite, more will be added later.
  10. Hello I am a visual basic .net programmer I have built alot of programs but few games I am looking for a .net c# and or vb.net project to join to get my feet wet so to speak if anyone here knows of a project or is starting one please let me know
  11. Has anyone here used purple sharp? At a glance it looks like a good api/engine it includes shading, database access, socket connections and much more. However I would like to know if anyone here has used it and if it is a good api/engine. I'm a visual basic.net programmer which is why I looked into a .net api/engine (no memory leaks :-) )