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Schildpad

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About Schildpad

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  1. Algorithms

    A book on algorithms and data structures is definitely useful. Not because coding famous algorithms yourself is useful in itself, but because it is a good way to learn about how to they work. A lot of them have already been implemented in a way that you probably can't beat by writing it yourself, but knowing how they work gives you a nice advantage when using them in larger algorithms for solving more specific problems that don't have a generic solution yet.
  2. If I remember correctly, the first Halo game has this. You're just a marine fighting the Covenant, doing what is your duty. A big part of the game is played in a squad and the player is not an especially important member of it. Ofcourse you play a very good marine who does some badass things, but I can't think of a moment where you are addressed personally or are rewarded for doing anything out of the ordinary. Then again, I've played this game when it was new, so it's been a while.
  3. Just to give you an idea (I'm in no way an expert on the subject): The problem with the first idea is that you will have a lot of threads if you have a lot of players. This could be a problem, but that depends on the game. If you never have more than say, 16 players connected it won't be a problem. The problem with the second idea is when something goes wrong with the connection handler thread, you have a problem. If I would be in your situation I would have a number of connection handler threads (like in your second idea), each one doing the same thing, but not as much as one for each connection. That way, if something goes wrong in one thread, there's still other threads doing work and you have time to start a new one. You could have all the connected clients in a queue and every one of the connection handler threads pops one from the queue, handles it and pushes it in again at the back.
  4. Quote:Original post by Antheus Quote:When using enums you know every possible value that the enumeration type In C++ you don't know, since it can contain any value. They are not type safe. Yes, you have a point right there. That wasn't really valid in the case of C++.
  5. There are other reasons for preferring enums over strings. When using enums you know every possible value that the enumeration type can have while a string can have any value and requires extra code for checking incorrect values (NULL or some random string like "slfjsklqjfml" is probably not a correct value). An example: By looking at the function's signature, what can we pass to this method? void doSomething(string param); answer: we don't know, it could be anything. Where can I find the valid values without looking at the function's implementation? answer: Don't know, maybe it's documented somewhere? By looking at the method's signature, what can we pass to this method? void doSomething(MyEnum param); answer: Any value defined by the enumeration. Where can I find these values? answer: Our IDE will probably tell us, or we can find this somewhere: Enum MyEnum { VAL1, VAL2, VAL3 }; Conclusion: When using a function that takes an enumeration as a parameter it is easier to know which values can be passed or we know where to look for them. When writing a function that takes an enumeration as a parameter we know exactly what values can be passed so we don't have to write any code for checking incorrect values.
  6. Breaking into Game Design

    Quote:Original post by Obscure Because they are not as dumb as you seem to think - they realised that a degree is useful for their career ... You could be right about some students, but a lot of them are just studying because they don't know what else to do and don't want to work yet. Even in university/master's. At least that's how it is where I come from. History is a popular choice for those students.
  7. Week 2: Learning Python...

    Getting a book is a pretty good idea, although most of the books on programming linked by Prinz Eugen aren't going to get you anywhere with python/unity and are pretty advanced for a beginner programmer. I've seen a lot of "beginner" books about game development go over the basics too fast. It might be interesting to make a few simple non game programs in python. There is lots of software involved in making a video game. Every aspect has several, a few examples: * Programming is usually done in an IDE (Integrated Development Environment). examples: Microsoft Visual Studio, Eclipse, Netbeans, ... * For content creation there is non game-specific software like 3D Studio Max, Maya, Blender (Open Source), ... and sometimes there's also a need for more game or engine specific software like Valve Hammer Editor, UnrealEd, ... * 2D content needs software too: Adobe Photoshop, GIMP (Open Source), Paint.NET ... * There's also software for recording/editing sound effects (Adobe Audition is an example) and music (Reason for example) It's not really realistic to actually be able to get quality results in every aspect out of 1 person. When starting out it's nice to have some resources for creating simple games: http://opengameart.org/ http://www.squidi.net/three/index.php
  8. school choices

    I think you should mention in what direction you would like to go. There is a big difference between for example modelling and programming. I am not familiar with the mentioned schools, so excuse me if your choice is clear if one is familiar with the schools. A CS degree is typically something that would get you into programming (if you build up a specific game related portfolio in your free time). I think when it comes to the artistic side that a degree is not as important as a solid portfolio.
  9. Say hi to the new guy

    I agree with PCosmin89, go with C#/XNA :)
  10. Super minimal graphics library

    You could use SDL. I think you'll have to write a function to draw a circle yourself though (or find one somewhere), but that's not too hard.
  11. A frist attempt c++ game

    Quote:Original post by DriveByBaptism You just said it buddy. You need to know DirectX or OpenGL. Two things I do not know lol. He said you need a wrapper for OpenGL or DirectX. You can make games with C++ without knowing anything of either of those. The easiest approach is to use a library. Popular choices include OGRE3D (3D) or SDL (2D).
  12. Never learn games programming!

    hehe, I think your post is quite amusing. I don't think you could go very wrong starting any of the things you mention. Just pick one, and go with that. If you’re having a hard time, try something else. Everything has it's pros and cons and you actually name some of them. There are lots of people in the world and it’s impossible to have everyone agree on anything. If you want quick results, pick something high level (the fun part comes sooner). If you want to understand what’s underneath these high level engines, go with something more low level, but expect a higher learning curve. After hearing all the pros and cons it’s up to you to make a decision.
  13. Top down game world

    What you are proposing could work, but it would take very large amounts of memory. There are better ways. A popular less memory intensive alternative is to use a tilemap. Try searching for these keywords: tilemaps, smooth scrolling
  14. becoming a programmer

    I think the best thing for you to do is make a portfolio and apply at small companies by going there and showing what you've done. If they don't let you talk to them right away, try to make an appointment. I think if you're there personally the chance of them actually checking out what you've done is a lot bigger. It's easy to throw away a paper or an e-mail, but it's not as easy to say "Hey, you don't have a degree, get out of here!" and they'll probably like the fact that you did more than just send in a paper and expect to get a job.
  15. How To: Worms' destructible terrain

    I wouldn't abandon the physics library. You only have to start the pixel collision detection once you have a collision between a bullet and your bounding shape.
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