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mvBarracuda

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About mvBarracuda

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  1. I recently found an interesting talk how smaller indie or open source projects can apply a non dogmatic leaner version of scrum for their work: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UnVZOl_8YYE Enjoy :-)
  2. Thanks for the insight blewisjr :-) Some of our programmers already use git-svn for the project. We might go for a split approach: * Code and ingame assets (rendered graphics) reside in a dvcs (git or hg) * Raw assets (3d models, textures) still reside in SVN
  3. Epydoc for actual code documentation: http://epydoc.sourceforge.net/ Mediawiki for the rest of the project documentation: http://www.mediawiki.org/wiki/MediaWiki/
  4. Thanks for the pointer Hodgman :-) We actually store the two different asset types at different places in the repository. Ingame assets (that are needed to run the game) reside close to the code in trunk. Raw assets (that are source versions of the ingame assets and aren't needed to run the game) reside in a separate media branch in SVN. We might move our trunk and code branches to git or hg but stick to SVN for the media branch. Right now the media branch is 250mb in size but it will definately grow as soon as we start to produce new assets for the game.
  5. Not sure if this fits in here, but as it's project management related, I'll go ahead. Feel free to move it to a different subforum. The video is based on the experiences of some Google developers working on Subversion. While it's primarily meant for open source projects, I'm pretty sure that other closed source volunteer projects can greatly benefit from it as well. Anyway, I've rewatched this video from time to time and I always find it incredibly useful and funny at the same time. Because the speakers describe problems you'll encounter in almost all team software projects that require collaboration. So without further ado, enjoy: How to protect your software projects from poisonous people [Edited by - mvBarracuda on January 7, 2011 3:43:21 AM]
  6. I'm sure zer0wolf meant to link here: Think Python :-)
  7. I think they're part of the assets that shipped with the original Quake 3 release you can still buy. However there are open source projects to replace all original assets with free (as in free beer and in free speech) versions. So you either have to acquire a copy of Quake 3 and get your hands on the original pk3 data files this way, or you track down one of the open source free assets projects for Quake 3. I don't have any experience in this field, so finding a good free asset package would be up to you.
  8. Do you use the original q3 source package ID released or the improved ioq3 package? In case you use the original ID release package, rather download ioq3, which already has a number of fixes and enhancement applied. I'm pretty sure that the originally released sourcecode won't build out of the box with MSVC 2010: ioquake3
  9. Did you build Boost from source or used a precompiled package, e.g. from BoostPro? If you've built boost yourself, try the BoostPro package. If you're already using BoostPro, rather build them from source and check if that resolves your problems. We had a similar problem with SDL in our software project (though it only showed up in debug builds), and we resolved it by building SDL from source. I had tried this back in 2008 and it was really complicated back then (could be lack of experience on my side though) and it didn't work out in the end. I've tried to build SDL 1.2.14 some weeks ago with MSVC 2008 and it worked like a charm. So building your own SDL.dll with your compiler of choice might actually fix the issue.
  10. Looks like this thread won't get more replies for the time being. I've posted pretty much the same question at stackoverflow as this thread didn't get much feedback. Some good suggestions where brought up there. We'll switch to distributed version control down the line, but we will try to ease the process by providing cheat sheets for each development department. This way they can easily look up how to take care of the usual tasks that fall into their department. For anyone interested in the details, check out the other answers at StackOverflow: Artists and (distributed) version control
  11. I haven't used it myself but there's also a library for the purpose that integrates ffmpeg with SDL: SDL_ffmpeg
  12. Quote:Original post by Kylotan I don't think such a thing exists, sorry. If there are any 2D tile engines for Python, they don't have a large community. Pretty much spot on according to my own experience. Shameless plug: FIFE might be worth a look. This said the engine still has a long way to go and there is no multiplayer support out of the box. So you would have to resort to using something like enet, RakNet or some other networking library for the purpose. But others have actually tried that and it seems to work pretty well. [Edited by - mvBarracuda on December 9, 2010 7:23:16 AM]
  13. Thanks for your insight samoth, that makes sense indeed :-) This said: we could simply continue to use Subversion for our media branch. The media branch basically contains source versions of all assets (textures, 3d models, uncompressed and therefore lossless versions of the sounds/music). You can take a look at the media branch here: PARPG branches/media However, if we move to Hg or Git for the programming department, the non-source versions of our assets (rendered sprites of 3d models, compressed sounds/music) would have to reside in the same repository. Otherwise keeping code and non-source assets in sync would be a nightmare I guess. It's a bit hard to explain in theory, so it might be easier by taking a look into our current trunk: PARPG trunk/game As you can see: the actual game code resides in trunk/game/scripts, while the graphical assets that are needed to run the game reside in trunk/game/objects. I don't see an easy way to decouple version control of our Python code from the assets in trunk/game/objects. So programmers and artists would either have to use the same version control software, or you would have to have a manager on the team who takes care of transfering the files that the artists commited into your SVN repo to the Hg/Git repo that the programming department is using. Any idea how this could be addressed? Maybe using some kind of tool like Sparkleshare would help (once it has become more mature and is actually cross platform)? This way the artists could actually work with a DVCS without having to know about the nitty gritty details. I remember that Sparkleshare is aiming for some kind of Github integration in the long run. Anyway, more feedback appreciated. [Edited by - mvBarracuda on December 7, 2010 6:56:36 AM]
  14. I hope that this thread fits in here. It's not software engineering related, but rather a project management topic. But as there are a couple of project management threads in here, I figured that this might be the right place to post in. Anyway, I'm working in the project management department of an open source game. Right now we're using SVN for version control and store code and assets in the same repository. Source versions of assets (models, textures) reside in a separate media branch, while the rendered versions of the assets (we're working on an isometric 2d game, so we actually use rendered 2d images of the 3d models in the game) reside close to the code, as they're needed to be in place to run the game. Our artists had a hard time to get started with using Subversion and to wrap their head around the concept of version control in general. Right now the project mostly consists of programmers and we're considering to move from SVN to distributed version control to ease working with branches (and the associated merging process) and sending in patches. We haven't made a decision about which DVCS to use yet, but we will most likely end up using either Mercurial or Git. While distributed version control is great for developers with a technical background, it might seem overly complex and complicated for artist and other prolly less tech savvy devs. So I'm looking for all kinds of advice how we could ease the version control workflow for artists. Keep in mind that using something like Perforce, regardless of how suited it might be for the job, is not option for a free of charge open source project. So I'm pretty much rather looking for advice, tutorials, project tools that make it easy for artists to wrap their head around distributed version control, especially Hg and/or Git. Is it even worth going down that route and try to get the artists using distributed version control? We could continue to store the source versions of assets (textures, models) in our existing SVN repository. But we would still have to find a solution for the assets that are needed to run the game, as they should reside close to the code in version control. There are a bunch of great DVCS guides out there, e.g. the Hginit tutorial. However the ones I've found were all written for programmers. It's great that they can now easily locally commit, use the full potential of branches and merge back their changes without too much hassle. But this might not be beneficial for artists but rather overly complex and scary to them. Do you happen to know a DVCS tutorial that was written for artists as the primary target audience? We're also using Trac for project management purposes, so if you know of a Trac plugin that is artist friendly, let me know as well :-) [Edited by - mvBarracuda on December 7, 2010 5:34:32 PM]
  15. Didn't see that the OP mention Monotone anywhere, but Trac is a pretty good suggestion. It integreates quite nicely with SVN and there are unofficial plugins for Bazzar, Mercurial, Git and a couple of other DVCSs. Check it you FordPrefectA: http://trac.edgewall.org/