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OdHero

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  1. Silent protagonists are usually a duller experience I find. There are so many moment where I want them to say 'NO! That's ridiculous' or actually shout out at a character rather than gasp. The problem is they are very unrealistic, as I find they just let everything by. 'Hey I left they keys back at the reactor, my feet are abit sore now so you'll have to go get them'. Now to me the reaction should at least be some kind of 'Your kidding, right?', but a silent protagonist it will be a simple go get the keys. It just doesn't make for good characters. I think people over emphasis how you can be the character when the character is silent. I can relate to some main characters in movies, I can feel them. They don't need to be silent for me to be in their shoes. I think silent protagonists are abit of an excuse to create characters who are less risky to be disliked by the player. At the end of the day its good for both types to be in the world, aswell as hybrids (e.g Mass Effect), but my personal preference would always be not to use silent protagonists in a game with a somewhat decent story.
  2. It sounds like a great idea. 2 inches could perhaps be too big? It would be quite easy for a human to see? Anyway,it could be great. One level could be the plumbimg pipes, only avaiable at certain hours when no water is running. You could be able to get in tanks in the children's rooms and drive around and shoot. You could climb the stairs like mountains. It could end up as, each server, is a street. When you start a character, you and some others start in one house, others in another, and so on. Player versus player could exist between different houses, or perhaps between both sides of the street. Players could fight together to beat something like a cat, that will then join their team. Elastic band sling shots could be made as seige weapons. Players must also keep there houses clean, or more cochroaches could invade that house. Weather could pose changes too. You could make a season system where each season is something like 3 days each? In winter snow forts could be made, in spring rain is more likely and a flood of the street could lead to battles in boats.
  3. As someone who started gaming as old school gaming was coming nearer to its end, I'd have to say that I enjoy both, just as much. 'New school' is obviously much more frequent now, and I love thoses games, and everyso often comes a game that looks old school, or has elements of old school games, I love both just as much really. I think if Old school games were still in style they wouldn't be the games we love today, and the industry would be bored, and longing for the 'new school' games we have at the moment.
  4. How do you normally do it? So far I make orginal names, but recently I have looked to old languages, such as latin and Gaelic ( What Celts would speak ). I prefer orginal names most of the time, but recently now I find it better to take old language words and tweak, or sometimes they give me inspiration. How do you come up with names of people places etc in your games?
  5. Mainly the player should have a number of ways to do so, like in the Hitman games. I'd suggest that the player could not be seen doing any suspicious act. E.g, Someone said unleash rats, the player must not be seen by anyone as a customer could report what happened to the shop owner, who will realise that he is under threat. Player should not kill anyone, or use any severe weapon, as it is a civilized city.
  6. No I disagree, I feel that modern games have music better suited to their atmosphere. However, I find midi music pieces more catchy, I certainly hum them more then I would the most atmospheric of pieces. Also I think licensed music in certain games is also normally strong, and put to well use. GTA-Vice City would never of been the 1980's without it. I liked some tracks from Burnout 3 and thought they suited the game correctly. I think music in games at the moment is 'going down the right track'.
  7. As much as I agree that working wih people because you pretty much have to is tedious, I sometimes find working with a freind even worse. It becomes stressful, your after this item and you don't want any mess ups, everyone is ordering each other it's not fun, it's business. But lets face it not everyone does want to make freinds. Many just want to play an online game for it's content rather than the social side. Also friends arn't always online and not everyone is patient.
  8. Yes it does sound an alright concept. I would say that the slaugtering newbs giving you punishment is a bad idea. Gun games, are much more rapid based games. If you want realistic battles thatare fun they must be rapid and heated. This would mean someone may kill a noob accidently. Perhaps a system such a world of warcraft where slaughtering noobs offer no reward.
  9. Is the last post meant to be for me aswell? At the moment I just want to get a better knowledge of the industry, it's true, I don't know anything on it, or at least I have no experience in it. There's been alot of argument which I havn't meant to cause. I didn't ever say I thought my ideas were brilliant, or my plans brilliant, heck, I didn't even say I was heart set on being a designer.However, like some who love a hobby, have wanted to take it one step further. At the moment I'm thinking on taking a computer science course which offers alot of programing skill for my further education, along with a few other subjects. Let's just say I'm keeping my options open. Like I said designing stuff has always been a hobby of mine, since being a kid I'd write stories, or draw all sorts of things, but for awhile now I was desinging my own game, I didn't think about sending it to a games company or anything like that, but it did make me curious if it was possible to simply presenting your plan to a company ( thanks to you guys I found it not likely at all ). And so after I wanted to know what exactly is a games desinger if not an 'idea machine' which at least in the general eye of most gamers is what they are believed to be. And I feel that has been answered. So I have got what I came for, I didn't come here for people to comfort me (although I didn't come to be flamed either) I just wanted straight answers from the community, and I did. So Oluseyi is correct for the most part, although it is much nicer to get an answer that is calm rather than more agressive answers. I hope that has cleared any argument in this topic. EDIT - Now checking through the Sloperama link, I have found the most detailed answer to my first question yet, it says how you turn the idea into a well written game design (I assume this as a plan, as sloperama describes it as having to contain stats, weapons, places, quests etc). There's even a guide to writing one, so I may try and turn my ideas into one. Also I have learned the plan doesn't get you game made, but it can land you a job. :) Great link. [Edited by - OdHero on January 17, 2006 2:23:04 PM]
  10. Thanks that was helpful. This my not be on topic, but I feel it has sort of drifted to this. I havn't had the dream of being a game designer for too long. I drew or my pictures and design as a small hobby, I never thought it could get anywhere, but a freind saw it and thought yeah this is good, you should be a games desinger. Now obviously it's just a freinds advice, but it made me look into the industry abit more nonetheless. Looking over sites I found different defintions of a games designer, many said these make the ideas for a game, design the story, charcters, levels and methods of play. Others said they work on a game idea presented to them, and program it. So what is the REAL defintion of Games desinger? (<<< This is the question :) ) I've been thinking it was the first one, about making ideas, but also directing the programmers etc. I was wondering if some of you people from the actual industry can tell me what a game desinger truly is.
  11. Hi, I'm a newbie round here to. I'm not to involved in the programing area of the site, but you'll probably want code for many weapons, lasers, canons, beams and such. I played Super R-type on the Snes I used to realy enjoy it. :)
  12. Sorry that was me above. And yes Obscure the link was helpful, I apologize that I did not check it, after seeing the first sentence I thought it was a flmae post, at least I know now that without any experince there's to little a chance anyone would even look at my plan, wheter detailed or not. More reason to get experienced.
  13. How about a writer/desinger combination? Or maybe writer/director? Thoses could work, but someone would have to confirm that as I'm just guessing.
  14. For me, I find that I'll finish a game if it isn't reptitive, I just played Resident evil 4, and I found it just perfect, it finished without me feeling like it was repitive or too short. It also had a easy, normal, professional mode, like many games do, I find that pretty important because everybody has there opinion of how easy games should be, and at certain times people want easier or harder games, depending on their situation. I would also say that introducing many things to do also helps me finish games. That's not just environments, new weapons or collectibles help, but mainly exciting new elements to play, such as new enemies, or puzzles, can really help.
  15. Quote:Original post by SiCrane Quote:Original post by GameFreeek So what if he hoped for someone to do it for him? Did he killed someone you have to be so hard on him and label his idea as worthless? He also already read all the other posts, topics and articles on the subject and still asked if he could get a game company to look at it. The answer was the same in all the other material he read and he still had to ask it. Twice. Obviously, the point needed to be hammered home. Please try taking these statements in context. If had accepted the original not so harsh answer in the first place, there would have been no reason to use the harsh response. Now I read previous articles about how IDEAS were apparently worth nothing. To me an idea is like getting a thought of what you think will be good for example, 'Hmm, jelly and chocolate with carrots may be good'. That's a poor example, but anyway what I asked was (and prehaps this was poorly worded so I'll rewrite it) on the lines of 'Does a detailed PLAN count for nothing?', that's not an idea, that's a plan written on paper, with conceptual drawings, maybe even demo's or short clips of game-play, on no site have I read about things like approaching with a company with a plan. So Obscure I didn't say I knew the answer, I only knew that idea's were useless, I was just asking if a detailed plan fell into the category of idea or not? And if not coyuld I get anywhere with it?