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Jerky

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About Jerky

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  1. Jerky

    Responding to Feedback

    Quote:The reason why people slam those beginners is because it is incredibly easy for that beginner to get in-over their head. I've tried to help a lot of beginners and they all end up coming back to me with failed attempts at creating a game and they start showing signs of lost motivation. If a beginner can start with pong, tetris, or a breakout clone, and finish it, that is more than enough motivation for a person to continue on with a more challenging game. No one can really argue against the statistics. It is absolutely true that out of the number of indie/hobbyist MMO projects out there, most of them fail. The real point is, however, that statistics are really just numbers. It is individuals who succeed or fail. To be clear, my "skeptic" in the following is not an individual, but a collective from my experiences with all skeptics. I've been arguing against that rationale for nigh on 2 years as well. From the dreamer's perspective, talking to the skeptic: what's it to you? I know the skeptics aren't noble individuals who are trying to save the newbies from painful experiences and wasted effort. I've never seen one who comes off as a caring parent who wishes to save their child from pain, which is what I would consider noble. The true/best teachers are those who encourage the student (read newbie) to experience it on their own and learn from it. This can certainly mean to allow, or even encourage, someone to take a road that will become a dead end. In the discussions that I have taken place in (and there have been a few), its always the veteran who has been around the block who is the most skeptical, and consequently, outspoken, on the subject. My question to these veterans is: have you done the same thing (tried to make an MMO)? If so, didn't you learn from it? Didn't that help you become the developer you are today? How does that make you want to stop someone from experiencing the same thing, and learning something for themselves? If, however, the answer to the first question is no, then how is your advice even remotely of value here? To me, only those who have tried and failed (or tried and succeeded) truly know what it is like to try. Yes it is true, a smart man learns from his own mistakes, while a wise man will learn from another's mistakes... but don't you have to be smart before you can become wise? The truly knowledgeable skeptics always come across with a huge amount of irony to me. To truly be knowledgeable about a subject would mean, to me, that you know whether or not it is possible. In my experience, these so called knowledgeable veterans, are the ones who think that it is most impossible. Blindness can strike us all, I guess.
  2. Jerky

    Responding to Feedback

    Quote:The reason why people slam those beginners is because it is incredibly easy for that beginner to get in-over their head. I've tried to help a lot of beginners and they all end up coming back to me with failed attempts at creating a game and they start showing signs of lost motivation. If a beginner can start with pong, tetris, or a breakout clone, and finish it, that is more than enough motivation for a person to continue on with a more challenging game. No one can really argue against the statistics. It is absolutely true that out of the number of indie/hobbyist MMO projects out there, most of them fail. The real point is, however, that statistics are really just numbers. It is individuals who succeed or fail. I've been arguing against that rationale for nigh on 2 years as well. From the dreamer's perspective, talking to the skeptic: what's it to you? I know the skeptics aren't noble individuals who are trying to save the newbies from painful experiences and wasted effort. I've never seen one who comes off as a caring parent who wishes to save their child from pain. The true/best teachers are those who encourage the student (read newbie) to experience it on their own and learn from it. This can certainly mean to allow, or even encourage, someone to take a road that will become a dead end. In the discussions that I have taken place in (and there have been a few), its always the veteran who has been around the block who is the most skeptical, and consequently, outspoken, on the subject. My question to these veterans is: have you done the same thing (tried to make an MMO)? If so, didn't you learn from it? Didn't that help you become the developer you are today? How does that make you want to stop someone from experiencing the same thing, and learning something for themselves? If, however, the answer to the first question is no, then how is your advice even remotely of value here? To me, only those who have tried and failed (or tried and succeeded) truly know what it is like to try. Yes it is true, a smart man learns from his own mistakes, while a wise man will learn from another's mistakes... but don't you have to be smart before you can become wise? The truly knowledgeable skeptics always come across with a huge amount of irony to me. To truly be knowledgeable about a subject would mean, to me, that you know whether or not it is possible. In my experience, these so called knowledgeable veterans, are the ones who think that it is most impossible. Blindness can strike us all, I guess.
  3. Jerky

    Man Vs. MMORPG Suspended

    You better resume! From 1 non-quitter to another, you've got something going here. I honestly did not find your journal until today, but I have seen you around (here on GD.net). It is good to know that people still do "aim too high," as I have felt the same loneliness that comes from embarking on such an epic task. Over on the Ogre3d forums, I have been in many MMO threads, defending the same task you are working on here. The differences being that my team is technically aiming higher, but have more hands than you. (I'm not suggesting that our task is harder, it is merely a similarity we have in common). I have, over time, helped them (the Ogre3d users) see that just because someone is working on what seems to be an insane task (to 99.9% of the public), doesn't mean the person doing so is an idiot. I have always prided myself on conducting myself professionally, and using proper spelling and grammar, which seems to have paid off over time. You can't truly argue with someone who is obviously a learned individual. Now, reading your journal today, I see someone who has much the same outlook as I have, and pride in how you convey yourself. True, there is a very high percentage of MMO projects that are just kids kidding themselves, but I think those who are not kidding are truly those who are innovators. These are those who understand the task at hand. And this does not mean working non-stop. Understanding the task at hand (making an MMO as an indie/hobbyist), means study first. Someone could look at my project and say you haven't got much to show for 2.5 years of work, but such a person would be blind. The true project is to create/sculpt individuals who are capable of doing such a task, and then doing it. Looking back over the last 2.5 years of work/research, I could laugh at the person I was back then. Knowledge is the vehicle, the finished project is the destination. Lets ride!
  4. Jerky

    Jam Packed

    Are those open-toed sandals while you are wearing khakis?! Amazing! I could tell thats how you would be man!
  5. Jerky

    Back In The Saddle

    Dude! I hope you feel better. We havent seen you over at PW for a long time. Come on back when you can. I got us a fully functional and pro-active programming team :).
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