John H

Members
  • Content count

    266
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

584 Good

About John H

  • Rank
    Member
  1. RIP Robin 'uavfun' Stanton

    Can't say I knew the guy, but from what people are saying here, it sounds like I missed out on knowing him. Just wanted to pass on my condolences.
  2. why not DX10 on Win2k?

    I never said I could justify having it. [grin] What you're both saying is of course true, but yes, please don't unbalance my "much loved ecosystem". [lol]
  3. Bye bye Bioware :(

    Yeah, that's a shame. Another set of titles bound to be an endless stream of progressively more degenerative "sequels".
  4. why not DX10 on Win2k?

    I think it's to force an upgrade. I know just how you feel - I really love Win2k, but now, I'm on a different computer using XP and it's just not the same. What was particularly annoying with regards to DirectX and Win2k, was the lack of SDK upgrades for it. Off the top of my head, I can't remember which SDK version I still have on my other machine, but I think it's already nearly 2 years old. I'll be damned if I'm getting Vista. I think I'm finally at that point where switching to *nix feels more worthwhile. I had FreeBSD about 4 years ago and that was pretty nice but unfortunately I didn't get much time to really get into using it.
  5. Instant Messenger Name

    There is no difference. They both compile into Microsoft Intermediary Language (MSIL).
  6. Hey, New member here

    Hey herb, Welcome to GDNet! [smile] Firstly, have you taken a look at the information provided here? It might answer a few of the questions you may have. As for actual games to make, it depends what direction you'd like to take. Some ideas include Pong, Breakout, Tetris and Pacman (roughly in this order, too). Each one represents a different challenge and differing problems. The question that springs to my mind is whether you'd like to stick with console development or move on to using a graphics API? As you've already made a few games, I see no reason why you couldn't move on to learning a graphics API and making any of the games above. They'd all give you a significant goal to work towards without being overly complex.
  7. What language should I use?

    You can go with either ASP.NET (created with C#) or PHP for this, it really depends on how you want to do it. Both PHP and C# have syntax that you'll be familiar with, so either should be fairly easy to pick up. There's a few things that may help you choose either way. Firstly, hosting. Are you just making this as a learning project for yourself or do you actually plan on hosting it somewhere? From what I remember, free hosting with ASP.NET was an absolute pain in the ass to setup to be useful to anyone trying to do something remotely beyond "Hello, world!". Free hosting is never great anyway (obviously [grin]), but I have had substantially worse experiences with free ASP.NET hosting compared to PHP. Secondly, it depends what sort of paradigm you'd prefer coding with. I've not used the latest PHP version, but before that, it really did have some funky OO concepts that would be really baffling coming from a C++ background. Both options allow you ways to create dynamic images and stream them to the browser. The great thing with C#, is that it uses a managed version of GDI to do this, which is basically GDI with a wrapper. So if you've used GDI before, you'll find what you're looking for, pretty quickly. I did a quick search for articles regarding image processing for both PHP and ASP.NET and quite a lot came up. From using ASP, I always remember www.4guysfromrolla.com being a great resource and that showed up in the list as well an article on www.codeproject.com entitled, ASP.NET Image Manipulation Examples: Adding, Zooming, Enlarging. Here's the Google links to my searches: ASP.NET :: PHP. Hope that helps.
  8. Input requested for character types

    Edit: Nevermind, I obviously can't read at night. They look fine to me.
  9. Writing to a File

    Congratulations on your newborn son! [smile]
  10. Quote:Original post by Maverick_24 many of you are saying that using std::vector is the easiest and best approach for begginners. Why then do introductory cpp courses at college levels not teach it? ...snip... Come on college level professors across the board are "often ignorant". whaaaat? yeah, some are, but come on, thats a not a good answer to my question. in fact, i would love to hear an intelligent and insightful answer. It's not as bad an answer as you might think. You have to remember that, just as you'll find on this forum with many people learning C++, there are significantly more people who aren't using the language as it was meant to be used, compared with the people who know it well. There is no guarantee that because someone is a professor, that they make a good teacher. Also, have you noticed that a lot of people recommend Accelerated C++ as a good book for making a start with C++? I took the time to read it a while back, followed by some other books from the C++ in-depth series and it teaches you how to use containers first and arrays/pointers second. You're probably thinking, "big deal, it's just one book", which is a fair point. However, I've been through many books to learn C++, all of which teach arrays and pointers before even introducing containers and I really feel that after trying to learn from both approaches, learning containers first made a big difference to my core understanding. The thing is, I've barely coded in 3 years because of tendonitis/CTS, so it meant that when I could finally start again that I needed to relearn a lot of fundamental things. It made me appreciate the approach shown in Accelerated C++ a whole lot more. Throughout the whole book, you're constantly reminded of how to use the containers properly and how the iterators can be used to access elements properly. It gives strong emphasis on making you aware that more is going on under the hood without exposing it to you so early that it ends up being confusing. Arrays and pointers are finally discussed in chapter 10. At this point, being as you have a better understanding of how to solve various common problems and are more familiar with basic constructs, discussing arrays/pointers gives you the sense that it's something you can micro-manage when you feel containers aren't appropriate for what you need. You're always fully aware of the implications of incorrect range checking. Learning this way around makes perfect sense because you get used to using containers on a common basis and using arrays for specific problems - just as it should be.
  11. Game Saving/Loading

    Quote:Original post by Drigovas ...[by the way, structs are pretty similar to classes in c++. Very, very similar... Just wanted to clarify this a little. Classes and structs only have one difference: the members of a class have the default protection-label of private, whereas a struct has the default protection-label of public.
  12. Artist classifieds?

    Hey Chris, Welcome to the board. The best place for you to start looking for an active project, would be the Help Wanted forum. With your experience, if you put up a link to a portfolio in a post, I'm sure you'll have no problem attracting the attention of a development team. Good luck. [smile]
  13. Wikipedia is Evil

    Someone set you up the bomb.
  14. Quote:Original post by OrangyTang A book printed through a reputable publisher (I usually find Addison Wesley to be good for techinical books) will go through at least one editor for review before being published. Random articles on the internet have none of that. I have to say, the Addison Wesley books have been terrific so far. Accelerated C++, Effective C++ and Design Patterns: Elements of Reusable Object-Oriented Software, have been the best technical books I've ever purchased. I'm still going through the Design Patterns book but I'm really enjoying it.
  15. Your dream game-movie adaptation?

    Syndicate (I miss Bullfrog :(). Grim Fandango would be great, too! [grin]