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gosper

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About gosper

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  1. Wow that is really messed. Microsoft is way stupid for that one. If count is less than the amount being copied into the destination buffer it should crop out the excess but ALWAYS null terminate. Perhaps they can learn a thing or two from GNU. PS. Microsoft is lucky I don't have any of their source code. ;)
  2. I just did a quick test on the _snprintf function using visual studio 2003 and it is in fact NULL terminating the buffer.
  3. Probably because strncpy doesn't NULL terminate the destination buffer. You have to do that manually. That could leed to a buffer overflow or a memory leek somewhere down the line. _snprintf is a better alternative.
  4. gosper

    Is hacking going to take over my brain?

    You seem to think that hacking and programming are two different things. True hacking is auditing code. Finding bugs. Then exploiting them. You won't be able to audit code if you dont know how to read code. You won't find any bugs if you don't know what to look for. And lastly you won't be able to exploit the bugs if you dont know how the internal architecture operates. It all comes down to pure programming knowledge. *NIX is generally more interesting to research because most of the internet infrastructure is built out of *NIX systems. Routers such as cisco are also very interesting to research. If your serious I recommend the following books. Advanced Progamming in the UNIX enviroment by W. Richard Stevens. UNIX network programming by W. Richard Stevens. All 3 volumes of TCP/IP illustrated by W. Richard Stevens. A good book on X86 Assembly language, pick anyone. All 3 sets of the Intel manuals. (You can get these for free just look on intels website). After that it would be good to move onto studying kernel internals and such.
  5. gosper

    How the internet works....

    Well, to explain how the internet REALLY works you would of had to of covered the routing protocols such as OSPF, RIP, BGP, etc. Then DNS somewhere down the line. Oh and also, TCP/IP, UDP and ICMP. I believe these technologies are the most important in making the internet work.
  6. gosper

    If you could, where would you live

    Quote: Just make sure you don't go in too deep unless you hate civilization, because it's seriously low population density; you'll easily be the only person for a few miles. Yeah, thats pretty much why I picked that location. :)
  7. gosper

    If you could, where would you live

    Upstate New York, deep in the forest near the Cat Skills mountain. In a nice log cabin, far away from anyone.
  8. gosper

    collision

    You could just use a library like coldet. http://photoneffect.com/coldet/
  9. gosper

    "I wish every american could see this for him/herself"

    A pull out would destabilize the situation even further. I was against the war in Iraq when it first started but now theres no choice. Our troops have to remain there until the Iraqi people can take charge of their own country.
  10. gosper

    Cross platform compilation?

    Linux and windows can use the same archetecture (x86) but, they use different formats for their binaries. Windows uses the PE format, linux uses the Elf format. I dunno if visual studio can output to elf format but I seriously doubt it.
  11. Working with Emacs and VI is supsosed to also make you more productive but, I rather choose Nedit or visual studio for a better interface.Blender's interface is horrible in my opinion. I rather use milkshape or 3ds max but, whatever works for you. PS. I am sorry if I offended you when I said blender sucks.
  12. At the end of the day it doesn't matter what tools you use. As long as you get the job done. Its better to be aware of the pros and cons of each option and choose the one best suited for the task at hand rather than fully commit to this or that.
  13. I've used both for very long time and I have to say when it comes down to 3d programming its alot easier to do it in Windows for the following reasons. #1 - Linux 3d drivers can be very hard to get working for unexpierenced users. Even if you do get them working you still risk the chance of them not working correctly. For example I've had some really messed up problems with the ATI drivers crashing when trying to access ARB extensions. When I gdbed my binary I found out it was crashing INSIDE the ATI driver. After some digging around and upgrading from XFree86 to Xorg I fixed the problem. This shows the lack of quality that opensrc can sometimes have. Its very hard to develope 3d applications when your 3d drivers and x enviroment are relativley unstable. #2 - The quality of the tools you have access for creating art under linux are seriously under par with their windows conterpart. I'm sorry if I offend anyone, but blender sucks really bad. It just doesn't hold up when compared to milkshape or 3dsmax. Also I would choose photoshop over gimp any day. #3 - If your programming a game or something that you want "normal" people to be able to run and try out then its alot easier to just develope under windows rather than porting your code from linux to windows. These are the only gripes I've had with programming 3d under linux. If you can overcome these obstacles then you might consider developing under linux. On the other hand if you want a no headache expierence and better tools I would go for windows.
  14. gosper

    Top Programmers

    Quote: Personally, I go for Paul Vixie... he's probably the first OSS guy to support software engineering, (see his essay on the latter, in the book "Open Sources"). Not to mention he wrote BIND (and thus, how he learned the importance of SE). You have to be kidding about Paul Vixie. I've audited the source code for bind 8 for years and it is by far the messiest/buggiest code ever produced. Paul Vixie was excplicity FORBIDEN to code on bind9 because he did such a bad job on bind8. The bind9 rewrite was absolutley neccesary given the state of bind8.
  15. Sounds like you want to make a game but don't want to put in the hardwork of programming one. I think your asking for a bit too much. You can't expect to develope a good product and not have to put any work into it. I suggest you try looking into darkbasic. www.darkbasic.com
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