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theycallhimSeeD

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  1. Thanks for the help!
  2. So I'm doing some general purpose GPU work (calculating PI on the GPU etc.). I am using XNA which uses DirectX. Using Fraps it appears that the frame rate is being capped at 60 fps. Also my timing data supports that claim. I remember seeing something about windows capping frame rates at 60 fps. Is there some way to work around that? Also do we know how the frame rate cap is applied?
  3. So for a project I'm doing I want to time the length of my draw calls. I'm using XNA and C#. Currently I am using the Enviroment.TickCount property for timing. Will that timer be accurate over the draw call? My only concern is that the CPU might stop itself while waiting for the GPU and the clock would not count the time accurately. Thanks for the help, if you want source code posted I can post it.
  4. Personally I'm partial to merge sort, but most people probably would not find it interesting. Probably going with depth first search to go through a maze would be the best. Problem there is getting a really simple version of it. For me and I think for a lot of other people recursion can be quite confusing the first time. Whatever you do keep it very very simple.
  5. Hey I found the error. In attempting to make my game class a singleton class I screwed up some of the code. So the real reason of failure was that messed up singleton model. Once I fixed that the mouse issue went away. Thanks for the help.
  6. So I am having an issue that my XNA game does not detect the mouse position correctly. Here is my update function. protected override void Update(GameTime gameTime) { MouseState m = Mouse.GetState(); if (m.LeftButton == ButtonState.Pressed) { Console.WriteLine(m.X + " " + m.Y); } base.Update(gameTime); } Now the mouse coordinates should be relative to the upper left hand corner of the window. When I click there the output is nowhere near 0,0. Each run the numbers change. Examples: 84 -5 217 169 195 142 Any ideas?
  7. I am using my GPU/pixel shaders to calculate PI (I'll talk about that below if you are interested). But in calculating PI I only use a few frames. So what I really is to be able to control when a frame is rendered. The code that I am working off of uses DXUT and I would rather not switch. Is there anyway to take over control of when frames are rendered in DXUT or should I switch to something else? If I should switch what should I switch to? How I calculate PI if you happen to care. So I make the screen 1024 x 1024 pixels. Then using a pixel shader make a texture where each pixel's color value represents the value in a series that converges to PI (http://functions.wolfram.com/Constants/Pi/06/01/). After I have the texture with all of the values I add up all of the values using a pixel shader (takes about 10 frames) then the one color left when converted to a number represents PI! The when I have the CPU calculate PI using the same series both my CPU and GPU get very close to the same number. Although my GPU takes about 25% longer. The series that I am using is (PI^2)/6 = Sum of 1/(k^2) from 1 to infinity. I am representing each pixel as a floating point number using the IEEE standard (32 bits in a pixel 32 bits in a float!)
  8. Recently I have been fooling around with pixel shaders and I am currently trying to make one which will add up numbers. So here is what I do: -Start with texture (512x512) with numbers to be added in the blue component (its 24bit 8 for each color) other components are zero. -Render a quad half of the size of the current texture (512x512 texture means 256x256 quad, quad texture coordinates for 255,255 would be (.5f,.5f)) -Each pixel for the quad is rendered through a pixel shader. The pixel shader adds up the color values for four points. It is adding up itself (in the upper left hand corner), then the 3 other points in the other quadrants. if point has coordinates x,y add up: x,y 1-x,y x,1-y 1-x,1-y Then check for overflow. The blue component is the least significant number, g is middle, and red is most significant. (ex. a Color.r*256^2 + Color.g*256+Color.b = number) output.b = frac(sum.b); output.g = frac(sum.g) + floor(sum.b)/256; output.r = frac(sum.r) + floor(sum.g)/256; -The output from the render is not send to the screen, it is saved to a texture. This texture is then fed back in for another loop. Each loop cuts the width and height of the values in the texture left to add in half. After some number of loops one pixel remains and its value can be calculated. At this point the program is adding numbers, but there is a significant amount of error. It seems to me like texture lookups were not meant to be as exact as I need them to be (I need them to be distinct from their neighbors where with a normal texture it does not matter if you blur it a little). Any ideas on if I am on the right track or not? Thanks for the help :D.
  9. Essentially what your AI is describing is like a "Greedy" algrothim. A greedy algorithm does whatever will help it the most for the current turn it is on. It does not look for what will help it be strong ten turns later. Its a good place to start but in general gredy algorithms are not the strongest against humans. My greedy player for board games like connect four or othello was very easy to beat compared to my AI player that looked ahead.
  10. "Could you tell me which sample your'e trying to compile? Where does it reside relative to the SDK install directory?" Its called HLSL workshop. It is in directX SDK\samples\C++\direct3d\tutorials\hlslworkshop "Also what compiler are you using? Are you using the correct project file supplied?" I am using Visual studio c++ 2005 express edition and I am using the right project file. thanks for the help
  11. *I posted this in the beginners forum and no one replied so I am trying here. Mods feel free to delete if you consider this spam* So running the HLSL sample tutorial from the DirectX sample thing for April 2006 I get the following error: ------ Build started: Project: DXUT, Configuration: Debug Win32 ------ Compiling... dxstdafx.cpp Compiling... DXUT.cpp DXUTenum.cpp DXUTgui.cpp DXUTMesh.cpp DXUTmisc.cpp DXUTRes.cpp DXUTSettingsDlg.cpp DXUTsound.cpp Generating Code... Linking... dxstdafx.obj : warning LNK4075: ignoring '/EDITANDCONTINUE' due to '/OPT:ICF' specification LINK : fatal error LNK1561: entry point must be defined Build log was saved at "file://f:\Documents and Settings\SeeD\My Documents\Visual Studio Projects\HLSLWorkshop\Common\Debug\BuildLog.htm" DXUT - 1 error(s), 1 warning(s) ========== Build: 0 succeeded, 1 failed, 0 up-to-date, 0 skipped ========== I have spend the last hour searching for fixes and have come up with nothing. Lots of google links from this error seem to point to SDL but to the best of my knowledge the sample doesn't use SDL (I did some searching in the sample and couldn't find it). If someone could point me in the right direction that would be great. I am including: DirectX sdk/include platform sdk/include libs: DirectX sdk/libs platform sdk/libs executables: platform sdk/bin
  12. So running the HLSL sample tutorial from the DirectX sample thing for April 2006 I get the following error: ------ Build started: Project: DXUT, Configuration: Debug Win32 ------ Compiling... dxstdafx.cpp Compiling... DXUT.cpp DXUTenum.cpp DXUTgui.cpp DXUTMesh.cpp DXUTmisc.cpp DXUTRes.cpp DXUTSettingsDlg.cpp DXUTsound.cpp Generating Code... Linking... dxstdafx.obj : warning LNK4075: ignoring '/EDITANDCONTINUE' due to '/OPT:ICF' specification LINK : fatal error LNK1561: entry point must be defined Build log was saved at "file://f:\Documents and Settings\SeeD\My Documents\Visual Studio Projects\HLSLWorkshop\Common\Debug\BuildLog.htm" DXUT - 1 error(s), 1 warning(s) ========== Build: 0 succeeded, 1 failed, 0 up-to-date, 0 skipped ========== I have spend the last hour searching for fixes and have come up with nothing. Lots of google links from this error seem to point to SDL but to the best of my knowledge the sample doesn't use SDL (I did some searching in the sample and couldn't find it). If someone could point me in the right direction that would be great. I am including: DirectX sdk/include platform sdk/include libs: DirectX sdk/libs platform sdk/libs executables: platform sdk/bin
  13. For array operations Java is slower since it checks for a program accessing an array out of bounds while c++ doesn't check. I think in the future graphics code will still be written in c++ because it allows you to have the control you need to get the speed. But for everything else c++ is slower, personally I think that python is going to become more and more used in game development as a scripting language. I have even heard of a model for designing programs where the entire thing is made in python then the functions that are really time critical are rewritten in c++. This allows you to get the fast development time with python but still get the speed you need with c++.
  14. Get the directX sdk (the source code for directX) from microsoft at http://msdn.microsoft.com/directx/ Then after that is installed there are a list of tutorials that are free.
  15. I don't know what parts are relevant. If you post an e-mail I can send you just the source code without the project stuff. That is just about 11kb. If you e-mail me: theycallhimtom@gmail.com or aim: theycallhimtom I can send it to you.