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amnesiasoft

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  1. Quote:Original post by rouncED my advice is get a new video card pronto and work with the newer api, its ten thousand times better. As was already pointed out, this is unnecessary. The DirectX 11 API can be used with DirectX 9 hardware. You can in fact make it automatically fall back to 10.1, 10, and 9. It will obviously not give you access to Direct3D 11 features on your Direct3D 9 graphics hardware, but it will let you get used to the 11 API, and it's changes, instead.
  2. I have a friend who is currently a senior in college doing Computer Science. I'm still pretty sure he doesn't actually know anything about programming. Take from that what you will.
  3. Quote:Original post by EnlightenedOne I certainly think that for the time being without a fully functional equivalent I would not be comfortable making the transition yet. Have you taken a look at the XNA Math library? It would seem to be what's intended as a replacement for it.
  4. I'm with the negative reactions here. It seems to me that this would be a really bad idea. I also feel it would have the opposite effect you desire. Instead of preventing players from grinding, you now encourage it by taking away their experience points if they spend their time doing anything that isn't combat. If you must have experience points and want to avoid grinding, make it so being a higher level than an enemy reduces the experience you gain, up to getting 0 experience at a certain point.
  5. The GameTime parameter passed to those functions contains a member named ElapsedTime, I believe, that contains the time the has passed between updates.
  6. I've never had luck with 3D acceleration on secondary monitors in DualView mode. It should start working if you use Horizontal Span instead. Maybe not the solution you're loking for, but I imagine it's better than nothing.
  7. That looks like it's going pretty well. And I'm not sure if it's just the video, or the fact it was running in windowed mode, but it looks like you could do with some optimization.
  8. My friend and I have implemented deformable terrain before, the way we did it was we had an array of bytes (basically a heightmap we loaded from a file) and would generate vertices from that (It could be optimized by just keeping a large list of vertices and modifying those as though it was a heightmap, but that's another topic) Point is, we'd just trim out the points we didn't need and only send the vertices being drawn to the graphics card. But I've not got any experience with Direct3D, so I'm not sure how one would implement it in D3D. But I hope this helps you :).
  9. @smitty: you should not assume int is 32 bit, it is guarantted to be at least as big as a short, and no bigger than a long, so it could end up being 16 bit. The same is true with double (float <= double <= long double, at least that's what the Microsoft site says)
  10. It seems to be a pretty nice language so far, I imagine after it has matured a bit (what's it at, 0.69?) it'll be a very good language. Also, a decent IDE would be likely to increase its popularity a lot (sure you can use C::B, but it takes too much effort to set up)
  11. Does anyone know how to send data from one instance of an application to another? Such as the command line parameters so the old instance will open them. So far, all I've managed to find is how to detect if there was already a running instance, and nothing more. Thanks. [Edited by - amnesiasoft on December 29, 2006 11:44:01 PM]
  12. I believe you're thinking of HLSL, in GLSL lerp() is mix() and saturate is not a function. that's nice information for me to know in the future if I ever write another shader, but that, unfortunately, does not solve my problem.
  13. Card is GeForce 6800 with the latest stable drivers. full code of the fragment shader is: uniform float HighAltDef; uniform float Tiles; uniform float HighFringeSize; uniform float LowFringeSize; uniform vec3 LightPos; uniform sampler2D high; uniform sampler2D low; uniform sampler2D fringe; uniform vec3 LightColor; varying float height; varying vec3 normal; varying vec4 pos; void main() { if(height &gt; HighAltDef) { float fringep = clamp((height - HighAltDef) / HighFringeSize, 0.0, 1.0); gl_FragColor = texture2D(high, gl_TexCoord[0].st * Tiles) * fringep + texture2D(fringe, gl_TexCoord[0].st * Tiles) * (1.0 - fringep); } else { float fringep = clamp((HighAltDef - height) / LowFringeSize, 0.0, 1.0); gl_FragColor = texture2D(low, gl_TexCoord[0].st * Tiles) * fringep + texture2D(fringe, gl_TexCoord[0].st.st * Tiles) * (1.0 - fringep); } vec4 WorldPos = pos * gl_ModelViewProjectionMatrix; vec3 light = normalize(LightPos - WorldPos.xyz); float intense = clamp(dot(normal, light), 0.0, 1.0); vec4 color = vec4(LightColor * intense, 1); color.rgb += 0.5; gl_FragColor *= color; } ad the vertex shader: varying float height; varying vec3 normal; varying vec4 pos; void main() { height = gl_Vertex.y; normal = gl_Normal; pos = gl_Vertex; gl_TexCoord[0] = gl_MultiTexCoord0; gl_Position = ftransform(); } looking at it now: I should probably get rid of height altogether, I added lighting calcs after getting the texture part right :P
  14. In the program I'm working on, I'm attempting to implement a shader to texture our terrain and give it some fringing (sure it's not the best looking method, but it'll do for us). In Render Monkey, the shader works fine, no problems at all. But, in the program after a call to glLinkProgram I check the info log and get the following from it: Fragment info ------------- (18) : error C1067: too little data in type constructor (21) : error C1067: too little data in type constructor Line 18 and 21 being (respectively): gl_FragColor = texture2D(high, gl_TexCoord[0].st * Tiles) * fringep + texture2D(fringe, gl_TexCoord[0].st * Tiles) * (1.0 - fringep); gl_FragColor = texture2D(low, gl_TexCoord[0].st * Tiles) * fringep + texture2D(fringe, gl_TexCoord[0].st * Tiles) * (1.0 - fringep); so. obviously, it doesn't work right. the error does not show up when Render Monkey compiles and Links the shaders and shader program. And Google has proven absolutely useless (is there no documentation on the GLSL errors and what they mean?) If you need it, I can dig up the shader code and post it as well. Thanks.
  15. Quote:Original post by methe Quote:Original post by amnesiasoft methe: you could try using a shader, that should work nicely for what you're doing. hmm. I don't think I will dive into the 800pages orange book about shaders sitting on my desk if I don't know whether I'd get significantly faster result. I guess where I loose time is in the clipping mathematics more than drawing the scene 3 times as each time the scene is incomplete (only one color level is drawn). Can you give me good reasons to jump into the shaders book? :) It actually wouldn't even require the Orange Book at all, I managed to write a shader to light and texture my terrain with some nice fringing after only 2 days of shader work, and I implemented it in HLSL, Cg, and GLSL. I'd recommend taking a look at Lighthouse 3D to learn some about GLSL, it's a pretty good place, and won't take you too much time. Sure you won't learn really advanced and complex things, but it's a start.