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Bacon and Eggs

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  1. Looks okay. But I like to do all of my logic first and resolve all the variables before displaying anything. So, if you had a clipping step where you removed off screen artifacts it would be done after the logic of positioning your character/dot (especially if the virtual camera follows your character) and before the rendering. So your list of items to do is good, it's just out of the typical order that I would do the functions at.
  2. It's the Holy Grail of all that is gaming, at least for me at the moment. But, everything, and I mean everything has to be done right for it to be any good. Pleasing graphics and sound, playability, uniqueness, security, network management, some kind of database knowledge, accessibility concerns, availability concerns, resource balancing, and a darn good motivational story. Plus those intangible soft skills of having to promote it and distribute it and enhance it later on. Through the journey to that grail, I'll crank out a tiny Pac Man/Pong/Breakout variant here and there, because I'm pretty practiced with the graphics/sound/playability department... but the rest I have SOOOOO much to learn.
  3. I've yet to see a good pillow fighting simulation... how about that?
  4. 3. Good at everything, just don't have enough time to do those things that need to be done... so everything suffers because of that. ... good programming is an art, so there.
  5. I would hope not! I went to school to be a games programmer, and it went crazy good. Alas I knocked up one of the few geek chicks that were in my class and had to go for the solid money first. 15 years later, I still want to make and release a game(s). But I also have the record of 15 years in the trenches of coding many assorted projects large and small. I, just now, only think I can make a full complete "fun" game that is meant for others... I'm 35 now. I thought I could make games when I was 15 too. But looking back at my code 20 years ago, I would have smacked myself plenty for not thinking about so many things when I created my games. Commenting, readability, source control, extendability, variable naming, packaging, performance, robustness... etc. Well, I don't think it's too old.
  6. Territory ownership by enemy NPC's/Monsters. I suppose following up on the enemies that do more then just stand around AI. Suppose the towns themselves can be taken over by whatever fiend is in the area if they are left to over-spawn. Then that may create the need for actual patrols to keep the town goblin free, a mild reason to grind. Shopkeepers who were killed in the raid will only respawn after the town is cleared. Monsters that use the equipment that they may drop during the battle before hand. Adjusting their difficulty by some amount so as not to make them all the same.
  7. I had this once... I just Base64'ed the XML... or Binary Text on one end and un Base64'ed it on the other. It increases the size of the message by a bit, but content errors vanish. If you are using Apache jars then it's almost available in there... it's a protected class for the java flavor of soap web services.
  8. I've got a good 20%/80% going... with the heavy leaning towards the classic games. When the household budget went south for a while, I lived off of MAME for a bout a year... but I had a great time doing it. I play a new game every once in a while, but it doesn't stop the overwhelming need to pick up the little scrappy arcade games that have been released on the game boy... It really helps that they didn't sell at blockbuster so they all went into the 1.99 per cart bin. Then again... Centipede / Millipede isn't as much fun without the trackball.
  9. What I found to be the most surprisingly large task that required a bit of design and work was all of the Character Maintenance dialogs. - Showing Party if there is one - Showing Detailed Stats - Cash and Treasure - Leveling Up - Stats or Skills - Adjusting Stats - Showing Items in Inventory - Individual Item Display and Effects - Using and Equipping Items - Buying/Selling Items in a Store - Load/Save Character or Game - Skills Dialog - Quest Dialog - List of Ongoing/Completed - Settings Dialog - (Error Dialogs) If you can whip together these dozen screens, give or take, you can apply them to any ol' type of RPG. Those dialogs are much more work then I thought they would be... but I had a pretty sweet design for making them, so adding just one more dialog was no big deal. (Start Screen, Game Over Screen, Credits Screen, Character Select Screen, Conversation Screen, etc... )
  10. I've gone both ways on this... I've polished content up until the rest of the game looked like a turd. But I get discouraged as if I spent 25 hours on one game object, I know I'm going to have to invest almost 25 hours on every other piece. I get discouraged. I've used nasty looking place holders which mean I'm not very happy showing off the game in any format whatsoever - not even demo. Alas, this is my preferred style. Only because in the middle of making some content, I get a bit inspired and may try something new out that I didn't plan for... or, by the time I get around to those tasks of fleshing out it might be months later for me... I may feel a bit differently about them. Then again, I don't work with anyone, and I'm not under any time constraint. If I were then I probably would go with the polishing up what I can as I could then tick it off the "Things completed list" and prove work accomplished.
  11. I has one of these going... Here is the high level trek that I made to get things a working... 1- A sprite class, something that can display a frame for an object at a particular coordinate(This class I use in everything else) 2- Some basic physics. Something that emulates gravity, and something that prevents the objects from falling through the floor... later I put in walls and ramps and things. 3- A script class, something that tells my object what frame it's sitting on for any particular event... sometimes it tells the object to move, sometimes to spawn other temporary objects like fireballs. 4- A set of contact rules, so that when objects are striking to see if they collide with other objects and then force them to react to them... as well as counting some score for the striker. It also handles victory and death of players. 5- Then I tossed in some AI... it's basic and crude, but works out not-to-bad. It follows and attacks when close enough. If there is a difference in heights, it jumps. 6- Then I added some dialog screens to start the game/finish the game/select characters/set options to wrap around the meats of the game. 7+. Added the ability to play sound and music. Tinkered with some networking capability. Tried to jam in a story line. Took months of play-testing and drawing new art for the characters and backgrounds because I want as much unique art as I can get - cause I don't feel comfortable using others work like that. Ensured that it played on multiple machines at an acceptable frame rate. Created an auto documenter that generates web pages for all of the locations and characters and items and objects in a game... it's a different VIEW for the model/controller. Years later... I'm still don't feel like I'm halfway done :(
  12. The lighting.
  13. Well, for me of things that are not included... Simple = Puzzle Fighter, Some kind of DDR - the arrows are 2D Advance = Dig Dug, Pengo, ATAXX Expert = Dodgeball, Wonder Boy in Monster Land
  14. 1) What made you want to become a programmer? - Whiz, from Kidd Video... the guy knew his technology. Plus he was somewhat cool, you know, playing in a band and all. 2) On average, how many hrs do you code a week? - For work, 30... for pleasure, up to 30... but that code time has been replaced with trying to improve my own programmer art for said games that I make 3) How do you keep programming exciting? - I can't, that's why I jump into related things, like art and sound for games, when I get the mojo back, I'll go back to coding... with a pile of artistic resources to drag along 4) If you wernt programming, what would you be doing? - Watching TV 5) Whats your favorite part of programming? - Making something that works so well, I never have to revisit it ever again... and if I ever have to revisit it, it's self documented and pretty easy to change. To sum up, the favorite part is enjoying the quality of work that is put in. Eventually I'll have enough pieces to block together a full game... I'm in no hurry.
  15. I've got this issue too, but mostly if I ALT+TAB away from the application to some other application. When I come back, there is no focus in the control I once had. I've not tried to fix it myself, so this is all just going on theory here... but if you get a focus listener on your framewindow and any time it gets focus you forward a setfocus to the child control on it that should actually have it. It may not work as focus events are pests to deal with, but it's a start.