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      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

Rycross

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  1. Ok, to answer the question directly, why not just use your favorite text editor and Apache Ant? See [url="http://ant.apache.org/"]http://ant.apache.org/[/url] Its the de-facto standard Java build tool. Also, I think you have some misconceptions about how Java's compilation model works. In your given example, you do not need to rebuild ClassTwo. Edit: You might also want to peruse [url="http://download.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/technotes/tools/windows/javac.html"]http://download.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/technotes/tools/windows/javac.html[/url] Javac will automatically recompile dependencies if necessary and it finds the source code (i.e. specified on the sourcepath). But again, in cases like the one you outlined, recompilation is not necessary.
  2. How much programming do you know? Picking out a bunch of libraries and tools and then asking if using them will lead to "great success," is putting the cart before the horse. You use tools and libraries because they fulfill a need, not because they're some secret ingredient to success. Start by picking out a development environment and working on your program, then add libraries as you need them. As far as actual libraries go, there's nothing wrong with the ones you picked. But whether you achieve success depends more on your ability at writing software than the libraries that you pick.
  3. Quote:Original post by mitdrissia Thanks guys for your fast replies. But i did not get a straight answer on my question. ... I hope someone can give me direct answer. thank you That's because there is no straightforward answer. It depends on a variety of things, such as your scene complexity, the hardware devoted to it (you say modern hardware but there is a huge range there, from iPhone to a $3000 state-of-the-art gaming PC), the amount of rendering time devoted to the scene (16 ms, 30 ms?). In other words, if you want a straight answer you need to ask a straight question. You're being way too vague to even approach a sensible answer. Edit: This is, of course, neglecting the fact that you're asking about a game, and there is more going on in a game than graphics. The complexity of the gameplay code and AI may be a factor in how much time you can devote to graphics. TL;DR; You're asking for a direct and straightforward answer to a vague question about an undefined problem space. There's simply no way to give you the answer you are looking for.
  4. Quote:Original post by shuma-gorath The latter one implies that mostly one's typing speed would be affected. Of course, programmer's are divided about the impact that would have. Given that I've worked with a developer with cerebral palsy, I'm firmly in the "Typing speed doesn't matter," camp. Personally, I'm more concerned about my mental agility as I age.
  5. Quote:Original post by VerMan Well, as you abeylin, i'm 33... i know 7 years from now seems a bit far. But I'm just thinking since i see job postings ("from 2x to 35", "over 40 need not to apply", etc) Where are you seeing such job postings? I haven't seen a single job posting along those lines, and in the US such a job posting is technically illegal.
  6. You could break the 30 puzzles per level into 6 sets of 5 and let the player solve 3 out of the 5 puzzles to progress to the next set. So you have 5 levels, each level has 6 stages, and you have to solve 3/5 of the puzzles in a stage to progress to the next stage. This gives clear progression but gives the player some wiggle room too.
  7. There's really no reason to learn DirectX 10 unless you're already working with a DirectX 10 codebase. DirectX 11 can support DX10 feature levels and works on all the same OSes as DirectX 10. DirectX 9 is relevant if you want to support older cards and Windows XP.
  8. Quote:Original post by Rich Brighton I've been taking a look at the containers and vectors in particular. The array will not need to be resized, although its dimensions won't be known at compile time. Its dimensions will be fixed from construction to destruction, do not vectors carry an unnecessary overhead in this case? No, you just use the reserve method to reserve the amount of memory you need up front, then don't add more data to it than its capacity (don't add without removing, or just use operator []). It won't be resized. In debug mode there are bound checks and whatnot to make sure you aren't screwing up, but they are removed in release mode and performance is the same as an array, which makes sense because vector basically just wraps an array. If you need different memory characteristics (such as drawing from a pre-allocated memory pool) you can also use custom allocators.
  9. Quote:Original post by nuclear123 im sure all of the above could happen :/ im sure u know alot more about it then i do. But i mean your program is dealing with extra code for objects(increased binaries), dealing with more objects(more memory usage)..so on. I might be wrong but i mean it just seems like when i started using RAII my simple library seemed to gain other classes in it, causing my class to feel less encapsulated(if this is the term to use). Not trying to hate ;) just verifying if i'm understanding this properly! -thx I think I may have phrased my post poorly. I don't think you're trying to hate. I think that you're expressing emotions and feelings about your code. Feeling that something is bloated may mean that it actually is, or it may just mean that you're doing something new with your code and are feeling uncomfortable adjusting to a new practice. What I am exhorting you to do is to try to examine those feelings and quantify them. For example, I might think that an approach "feels" slow. It behooves me to actually write up test cases and confirm whether the approach actually is slow. Otherwise, I'll likely spend time rewriting the code for no gain, and possibly end up with a messier code base. For example, in your case, yes RAII introduces new classes. However, these classes are designed to be proxies that represents references to the underlying classes, so they don't actually break encapsulation. RAII techniques are also an application of single-responsibility-principles (SRP), because they move the resource management code out of the class/classes that are utilizing the resource and into a class dedicated to that purpose. So, in other words, you're likely feeling that its bloated because you're seeing more .h files than you're used to, and this makes you uncomfortable. But, as I said before, its important to act on facts, not feelings.
  10. "Bloat" isn't any sort of technical description. Its an emotional one, and one that may not be grounded in reality. What exactly do you mean? More time measured in book-keeping code? Measured increase in memory usage? Bottlenecks? When people talk about bloat, all they are doing is making vague general statements about how they "feel" about a program. You should endeavor to quantify your statements about the impact of a change.
  11. Its usually a good idea to use your real name or a handle when appropriate. Handles should be used for any sort of opinions or recreational use (games and whatnot), while your name should be used for anything professional. For example, I use my real name for LinkedIn and Stack Overflow, but a handle for social sites like Reddit. The idea is this: In this day and age, employers/landlords/etc are going to google your name. If you have an uncommon name (as I do) then they're going to find you. You want that information to put you in a good light. So the idea is that you make your "professional" self available so you can look good, while keeping your private life private. Also, keep your Facebook locked down, and only put the bare minimum on there. Employers check that too. Also, never use an online handle for anything requiring professionalism. Job/college applications should be given an email address that resembles your name, period.
  12. Game looks interesting, but I recall some of their devs being jerks while waiting in line at PAX 2009, which kinda dampens my enthusiasm.
  13. Are you actually initializing the memory in the first case before using it? Global variables are often zero-ed out, while as dynamic allocations such as the one you made are not. As a result, it will have garbage data in there until you initialize it.
  14. Quote:Original post by LessBread Others have already demolished this claim. Social Security is no more a pyramid scheme then liability insurance is a pyramid scheme. The reason there is so much hatred for Social Security is because the financiers on Wall Street hate the fact that they don't get a cut of it. They have spent millions of dollars to fund a decades long propaganda campaign training the public to hate it too. My perception has always been that the right would love to get rid of Social Security but cannot actually touch it for fear of losing the retired vote. Instead, they have opted to go about its destruction in a roundabout manner: claim that it is a financially nonviable program. Call it a pyramid scheme and rant about how its going bankrupt. The solution? Privatization, obviously. The ruse is transparent, and yet no-one seems to call out the people making these claims.
  15. The current election is for Congress and various state-level positions. Usually, mid-term elections (that is, elections held when the President is not up for re-election) are seen as a referendum on the current President. Because the Republicans gained the House majority, a lot of people are claiming that Obama has lost support.