• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

double O seven

Members
  • Content count

    408
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

238 Neutral

About double O seven

  • Rank
    Member
  1. ok thanks.  I'll look into that too.  I think I have my work cut out for me now.
  2. Anything you want to do with C++ beyond general purpose programming is done using some library, which is not part of C++.   So to me, your question is trying to connect two unrelated things. That is, "graphics programming with Python" or "graphics programming with Lua" would basically give you the same answer, except you write the calls to the library a little different, that's all. Obviously, from a book-author point of view, this is great. I write the explanation of some graphics library once, for language X. Then I modify the programming code to language Y, and I have a new book. Then I replace it to language Z, and a third book!! In other words, cheap money from people that don't understand the connection between a programming language and a library. In other words, "Foo programming and Your language" are much less tightly connected than you may think. The library calls that you make do the actual work, and they are the same no matter what language you use. Graphics programming amounts to "just do the right library function calls at the right time".   A second point is "graphics". It's a very big area, not to mention huge insanely big. There is no book that covers all of it. If it would exist, I wouldn't recommend buying it, since it would be way to shallow to be of any value. In other words, it makes a lot of sense for you to pick a subset of "graphics" first before trying to find a book. A second possible approach is to focus on graphics only, and not so much on programming, since in the end, it's just a bunch of library calls that you do for "programming graphics". Even graphics on its own is a big field, of which I have little understanding, so I can't give you much guidance there.   You can also start at the other end. There are some popular libraries that are used often, like SDL2, SFML (both mostly 2D oriented afaik), and OpenGL (fully 3D). Windows has its own set of libraries, DirectX and maybe a few others (I don't know Windows). Find the tutorials of them, and work through them. I wouldn't be surprised if that is enough to understand how to use that library. Beyond that, it becomes time to do some programming with the library for a game of your own.   - SDL2 and SFML  Stuff like that is what I mean for 2D graphics.  I've heard of SFML and I think I remember seeing a book about game development that uses that library/set of libraries.  I'd have to find it again.  But thank you for that. Basically stuff like that is what I'm after.  To start with I'd like to learn to take basic sprite assets made in a paint program and make it all into a game with code. You're right though, I have very little understanding of how general code and graphics libraries correlate. I had to look it up to know SFML is an API.  It says its written in C++ with bindings for other languages.  I feel like an idiot saying this but I didn't know different programming languages could tie into each other in that way. 2 other things I wanted to bring up real quick..... 1.) I was googling some examples of game and graphics code with C++, and I noticed a few of them using the libraries #include<graphics.h>   and   #include<conio.h> Are those 2 libraries specifically related to graphics?  Well, graphics.h obviously, but that was just something I noticed them all using. 2.) A buddy of mine I used to talk to a lot had programmed some games and he still has the section of his website up that has source code examples.  You can go there and view some source code for them.  I think they're written in straight C though. http://vazgames.com/retro/ But something I noticed about his 2D frogger demo is he didn't use any #include <graphics.h>.  It looks like its just using regular libraries.  His tank game does use OpenGL because its 3D. But yea, I guess I'll start with the resources you provided Alberth.  Thank you for your help.   ok, I'll check that one out.  Thanks for recommending it.
  3. Both would be good.  UE4 I dont mind.  But ultimately I'd like to learn how to write graphics code from scratch just using available libraries.  Anything you or anyone else can recommend.
  4. Hi, hope this is the right section for my post. I'm learning the basics of C++.  I've messed around with it over the years off and on.  Tried some random books and tutorials online. Back when I decided to try it C++ was all the hype.  So its what I decided to stick with.  I'm just more comfortable with it because I'm familiar with it.  I tried Game Institute online.  Its alright but I found the tutorials a little scarce on details.  Then I ran into Cave of Programming on youtube and it gave me a nice boost of knowledge.  But again, it lacks in some area's. The one I'm learning from right now is Sams Teach yourself C++ in an hour a day (updated for C++ 11).  Bought it from a book store and so far its the best of the bunch.  I'm about a quarter of the way through and its pretty solid. Eventually I might sign up to educator.com for their C++ courses. But right now I'm just wondering if anyone knows of some good books (consumer or college level) that goes over graphics programming with C++.  There's a slew of them on amazon but I thought maybe this would be the best place to ask.  Most of those books have so many mixed reviews its hard to pick. Like I said I;m not ready for graphics coding yet but I'm trying to prepare early so I wont have to hunt around for resources when I am.   But if there's any books or online learning anybody can recommend that would be great. Thank thanks in advance for any help.
  5.     well I guess I was under the impression that building a homemade system would save me money and to be honest its more of a hobby experiment right now.  But I do intend to use this for some film projects. Im not really all that versed when it comes to the mechanics either.  I mean I had the mindset that anything can be rigged up and if it works it works right?  Ive checked out so many of these electronic camera rigs (especially the one you linked me to) and I have to admit the set up looks intimidating.  I can only assume that stuff was designed by qualified engineers.  and each piece serves a purpose.   .....Going back to what you said about something heavy duty being more stable, thats why I mentioned the use of AC motors.  Im assuming bench grinders use ac motors.  Not sure but if they do thats the type of stuff im referring to.  Ive seen how much HP they can generate.  Pretty strong motor.   Nope, not webcams.  The particular type of cameras I had in mind are dslr's.  But also built to support the added weight of other lenses like anamorphic.   Now heres another question.....  AC vs DC.  Will both these motor types give me the same amount of HP? Theres the devices jms mentioned, the newport multiaxis controllers.  I looked into those a bit.  Could be wrong but as far as I can tell they are built for everything but AC's.   Theres so much I dont know about all these motors and the digital/optic/encoder stuff you mentioned too.  So I guess I have my homework cut out for me.     BTW,, Just to get a human response on this without having to figure out a bunch of technical info,...  what are encoders?   and your advice is def much appreciated.  thank you man,
  6.     I don't know what that means. I think you refer to some kind of position or velocity feedback.   Might be helpful for you to look at commercial products to get a feel for what you can get off the shelf. Most of those controllers have a way to compose complex motion with multiple axes. Also, look at sites for homebrew robotics, lots of info there.     Position and speed control is what I meant by spline control.  Sorry I should have explained that better.  I asked some robot programmer girl on fiverr about this stuff about a month ago (needless to say she took my money and hauled ass), but I made this video for her that explains how I wanted to use a spline editor to for position control.   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yic_e41YtbU&list=UU7inknJPD1n6kVTdNmU6Hbg   (if the link doesnt work let me know, I have it locked.)   BTW, I wasnt talking about modifying a board.  Just hacking it so to speak so I can repurpose it to be used with software.  But im just spitting out idea's, I dont know how or if any of that would even be possible.   Is there a difference between dc, steppers, and servo motors?       sorry, the vid should play now.   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yic_e41YtbU     Cool, I wasnt sure what the difference was between AC's and DC's either.  I just assumed one ran off battery while the other used an electrical outlet.  Do you think it would be in my best interest to go ardruino for a start?  From the looks of it its designed to be programmable.  It wouldnt be for a final product because im looking to build something more heavy duty, but it seems like a nice learning device.   But thanks jms,  And thanx to all the gamedev community too.  you guys are great.
  7.     I don't know what that means. I think you refer to some kind of position or velocity feedback.   Might be helpful for you to look at commercial products to get a feel for what you can get off the shelf. Most of those controllers have a way to compose complex motion with multiple axes. Also, look at sites for homebrew robotics, lots of info there.     Position and speed control is what I meant by spline control.  Sorry I should have explained that better.  I asked some robot programmer girl on fiverr about this stuff about a month ago (needless to say she took my money and hauled ass), but I made this video for her that explains how I wanted to use a spline editor to for position control.   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yic_e41YtbU&list=UU7inknJPD1n6kVTdNmU6Hbg   (if the link doesnt work let me know, I have it locked.)   BTW, I wasnt talking about modifying a board.  Just hacking it so to speak so I can repurpose it to be used with software.  But im just spitting out idea's, I dont know how or if any of that would even be possible.   Is there a difference between dc, steppers, and servo motors?
  8.     Thanks luckless.  I looked into robots before but wasnt entirely sure.  But I guess the robot forums are the place to ask around. I appreciate your help, thanks.
  9. Sorry if this is the wrong forum....   Im trying to get more information on a device Im trying to put together.  But I dont want to start throwing money at this idea until I know what needs to be done.  So I figured this would be the best place to address this question..   Im looking to build a motion control rig.  Basically an electronic arm with 4 or 5 degree's of freedom, its purpose is to hold a camera and it would have the ability to keep repeating the same exact movements as many times as needed.  Its a way to composite multiple things into the same moving shot without having to rely so much on cgi.   But im also kind of in the dark about a controller.  What I want to do is use bezier splines (just like the fcurve editor in blender) to control the path for each ac motor.  The shaft turns one of two ways so having the motor communicate with a computer somehow by means of splines is what Im trying to do.  (there are a few spline editors available online that are stand alone apps, so I dont think using blender would be necessary if it can all be done independently).   But heres the problem, im not skilled or that knowledgeable in electronics or programming (I know, it sounds silly that Im pursuiing something so unrealistic).  But thats why Im just going on research Ive already done. So far the things I THINK I will need are,... - AC motors - VFD (variable frequency driver) controls the speed and direction of the motor shaft. - A pc that connects to the vfd to communicate.   Now Im not sure how to go about something like this.  I would imagine that a vfd would have to be ripped apart to get access to its circuit board.  But thats why Im asking all the questions I can before I jump head first into this.  And its obvious at this point that I will have to hire an engineer or 2.   But if someone could point me in the right direction or give me some advice it would be greatly appreciated.   Thanks.
  10. thanks for the responses everybody.  This does put my mind at a little more ease. I already have the main 3d programs like blender max and maya. Now I'm not sure how true this is I'm just going by what Ive read.  Apparently big companies like pixar don't use maya as much as I thought.  Someone said they use their own proprietary 3D software so if they want to make changes to it they can.  I guess they can't do that with maya because they don't own the source code. In a way that sounds ridiculous but in a way it makes sense.  But just things Ive read about.   anyways I really appreciate your responses.
  11. Well, Ive been looking around online for information on animation degree's.  There's AS and BS in animation from art colleges that teach it, but those degree's cost a hell of a lot more than they will ever be worth if you ask me.  Plus they're not honored by many employers from what I understand.  And I keep hearing more bad things than good. I also hear theres art degree's too but to be honest I've never been a firm believer in that one.  Nobody can teach you HOW to be creative.  Thats something that has to come entirely from ones imagination. But anyways, through the research Ive done the 2 closest candidates would be comp science or mathematics.  Im assuming comp is the more pricey one.  But I havent really checked up on any tuition info so I could be wrong.   But my main question is which one would be more closely associated to 3D animation?  Similar to what disney and pixar do?  Not the programming just digital geometry and animation.   Any advice is most appreciated.  thanks.
  12. num1 is a integer variable created earlier, set to equal 5.     lol oh ok.  I get it.  Sorry.  Still learning. I feel like an idiot now.
  13.   Not to sound noob but whats going on with  int num2 = increaseBy2(num1); I dont think I have studied that yet.  What does (num1); mean?
  14.     right thats what I thought it was.  By reference means you create a variable and assign it a value, then use the variable as the part that gets passed to the next function. But by value means you just stick an actual number in the function call to be passed right?
  15. First let me say how good it feels to be around an online community of skilled developers.  I feel like I can get some real guidance here.   Long story short, I'm trying c++ again because I'm waiting for epic to release UE4.  Apparently they are doing away with Unrealscript and replacing it with straight c++.  It was confirmed in some article I was reading and the author goes on to say something like "Start learning some c++ and prepare yourself.  Trust me, its not as hard as you think". So I decided to give it another go.  And this time I'm having a little more success because im not really thinking about games.  Just trying to learn it.   Anywho, Im stuck on function parameters.   This youtuber guy Bucky (Thenewboston) explains it ok, but I feel like he's leaving out some valuable information. So I searched around a little more and found this guy  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MPREORW3kyY   All his code worked, then when I started mixing other stuff with it like other statements and functions it still worked.  The only time I was getting errors was when I screwed up and didnt realize it.   QUESTION...   The way I understand it function parameters are just functions that require more data to run.   int FuncTwo(int G);          //  This is the prototype   int main () {           int F = 5;           int result;           result = FuncTwo(F);           cout << "The result is "  << result << endl;   return 0; }   int FuncTwo(int G) {             G = G + 5;             return G;   }   Am i correct on this............   result = FuncTwo(F);   FuncTwo(F)  is doing 3 things.  First its holding a value of 5, hence variable F to take with it to the function FuncTwo.  While there it calculates that with whatever equation is in that function.  Then return G tells it to bring it back to main.  But it would already do that anyways in c++, but since the variable "result" is in front of the function call its automatically telling that function that whatever the result will be to store it in that variable when it comes back?   This stuff i getting really tricky.  But I gratefully appreciate any help.  thanks everybody.