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smc

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  1. If the project is an ethical research project as applied to game development then your questions are not appropriate. More then likely you will not get the answers you are looking for with regard to ethics. Your questions are more along the lines of what game industry workers think, which in my mind is a survey and has nothing to do with ethics. If you want to impress your teacher (and learn to think ethically) then apply utilitarian, deontologic or any other branch of ethics to the field. For instance you could use Ross' prima facie duties as applied to decision making during game development (as a whole or parts of). However, this is more along the lines of original work. There has to published works on this topic. I suggest google scholar as a bare minimum starting point. I do not have the requisite experience to answer your questions. However, I will say that I apply a blend of Rossian and Utilitarian ethics while designing and implementing software. Most of this is done during interface design (code and user). I also apply it when taking on new projects (i.e. Is the use of the software product ethical) [quote]Original post by FrozenSnake Quote:Original post by LockePick Feel free to tell me a title of a book in the subject (Ethics in game-development). In case these help. Gamasutra Article Published Paper D Takahashi ethics can be fun. Hope you enjoy it. Edit: This paper seems interesting M Sicart - Proceedings of DIGRA2005
  2. Thank you. This works very good. Mapping to PI_OVER_2 is all I needed to change.
  3. I have a vector which can point to any coordinate on the top half of a unit sphere. The vector location is generated from accelerometer data. I am trying to project the position into a circle on a plane. Problem: I naively used a simple projection onto the x,y plane. As the vector approaches the x,y plane the distance traveled on the sphere surface does not correspond to the distance traveled on the x,y plane. My rusty math skills are showing. What I would like to do is project these points to a 'flattened' sphere. It would be nice if the point distance distribution was linear. For some reason I am coming up empty. I end up converting to cartesian which I do not want. Any pointers would be very helpful. Edit:<bad idea removed> [Edited by - smc on May 3, 2010 9:13:02 PM]
  4. Quote:Original post by kibokun I understand this isn't the end-all, be-all. It's the "if all else fails" option on my list of post-graduation priorities. Ideally, I'd be able to attain a game-programming position upon graduation. If not, then I'd hope to have a non-game programming job lined up. If I can't find a job at all, I'd like to continue my education and build my portfolio at the same time. Attending grad school should not be a 'if all else fails' option. You should have a real desire to go. It will not be anything like an undergraduate program. I don't know, maybe these game dev programs are different from standard CS graduate programs.
  5. When I looked into grad school the only type of assistance I qualified for was loans. I would suggest trying to win scholarships. You may also qualify for grants. It may be possible to reduce your total out of pocket down to 5k, but I highly doubt it. From what little information I have seen, grants and scholarships are mostly targeted for undergrads. There are other options. Working as a research assistant. Teaching classes etc. These things will most likely not apply at SMU. I know they do not apply at the UCF Game Dev masters program. The professor I consulted with about grad school suggested I attempt to get into a PHD program. This way it is paid for by the school (by teaching and/or working as a research assistant). If I did not pass my quals or decided it was not for me, then I could simply leave with no large debt and a masters. Be prepared to go into debt. FSA
  6. Quote:Original post by Daerax Unity is not in the clear till Apple clarifies its broadly vague terms. And then again when it haphazardly enforces it and then maybe again when it does a double take. But To the Letter it is not allowed. vaguely the agreement states "App must be originally written in Objective C or C or C++ or Javascrpit through webkit" and Unity Apps are originally in a language that is not allowed. And yes, in its current form the wording has a massive area of effect and potential for much collateral damage to allowed tools. You are right about the vagueness of the wording. I commented above on 'originally written'. A machine could write the C/C++/ObjC. The input to this generative system is irrelevant. It is my understanding as long as everything goes top down through the tool chain you are good. It will be interesting to see how this turns out. I for one will certainly consider taking a hit in the wallet if it gets to out of hand. I understand preventing QT type cross compiling. Preventing tools like Unity is pure evil. [Edited by - smc on April 11, 2010 11:47:06 PM]
  7. Quote:Original post by capn_midnight Quote:Original post by smc First and foremost Apple is a business. They have shareholders. They are not in bis. to please you as a developer. Historically Apple has been shitty to their developers. Bottom line is Apple is going to do what Apple thinks is right for Apple. Not you or me or anyone else. Okay, fine, whatever. Banning other programming languages doesn't do a damn thing to appease their shareholders. It doesn't make Apple anymore money, it doesn't drive new business to their system, it doesn't do anything other than confirm what everyone has thought all along: Apple is nothing but a bunch of elitist pricks who would rather shoot themselves in the foot over some nebulous, subjective thing they call "elegance" than actually get stuff done. If this were about quality, then why are there a dozen fart sound apps in the store? It is truly too bad they had to specify particular languages. A true shame indeed considering they use GCC/LLVM. It is my understanding they do not want cross compilers targeting their platform. How they legally define that is beyond me. I could not agree with you more. I am not doing of a good job of appearing neutral. There just seems to be a bit of rash thinking about what this means, and I am just giving my interpretation and regurgitation of what other smarter people have stated. Yes, the app store is going to be filled with crap regardless of what language/compiler/API crap developers use. A few nights a week I look at the new app list on my ipod. You know things are really bad when 'developers' can not even take the time to exclude other countries (I am tired of seeing apps in Chinese). It is really a shame. Reminds me of all the crap games in the 80's and the death of the 2600.
  8. Quote:Original post by way2lazy2care Quote:Original post by smc Honestly I agree with some of the philosophical arguments being discussed here and elsewhere. However, I do not see what all the bitching is about. I can understand some people are pissed off sense they put in X months of Flash development in hopes that this avenue of development was coming in the next iteration of CS. I say hopes because that all it really was. Adobe never has nor will they ever control what gets put on the apple mobile platform (as is the case with anyone). Furthermore, It has been known for some time that Jobs is anti flash. This is not a big surprise they did this. Besides Adobe is working on Flash to HTML5. The initial presentations look promising. Then you can truly be multi-platform assuming the browsers are HTML5 compliant. If I develop for Android I use eclipse and java. If I develop for the upcoming windows phone I use VS and C#. If I develop for iProduct I use xCode and Objective-C. Do I have choices on the other platforms. Sure, and that is nice. But if I want to play in apples sand box I play by their rules. The same goes for MS, Google, the US government etc.... As to third party analytics. Apple is going into the mobile add business. This makes sense. First and foremost Apple is a business. They have shareholders. They are not in bis. to please you as a developer. Historically Apple has been shitty to their developers. Bottom line is Apple is going to do what Apple thinks is right for Apple. Not you or me or anyone else. John Gruber states most of my feelings more eloquently. another sane post edit: link addition. I think unity developers have a lot more reason to be upset than flash developers. Unity is supposed to support iPhone development, so pretty much anyone that was developing on unity with the promise that it would be able to release on iPhone is going to be boned. It's also just crappy that people can't use outside APIs. that's going to raise development costs a lot. I would be very very mad if I had purchased Unity 3D for the sole purpose of developing for the iPhone (and it ends up being 'banned'). That is some expensive software. But.... from there web site. " Seamless Publishing Workflow Publishing a build for iPhone will create an entire, complete XCode project that just works. Press "Build and Run" in Unity and put your feet up. Relax until your game automatically compiles in XCode, installs, and launche " I think they are in the clear. None of what they say seems like a true cross compiler (linking to cocoa libraries to provide generic interface routines... intermediary). The fact that Unity builds a xCode project says to me they are generating code to be compiled by the tool chain (not a violation). There scripting is compiled to native ARM assembly code. I assume their scripting does not interface with cocoa nor a run time layer over cocoa, but rather their internal engine. This does seem like a fine line, but I personally do not see a violation. If this was a violation then I would venture to say there are tons of games that violate. I really think Unity will be fine. There is no cross compiling going on here in the sense of iPhone development. They are cross compiling for their engine which presumable is written in C and can be targeted to the iPhone in its own right. The scripting is meant for their engine and is not interpreted. It is also not meant for general purpose application development like Flash. There is no restriction on outside third party API's as long as they don't act as a intermediary and allow linking to the Cocoa API. It is my understanding the meaning of linking pertains to compilers. In other words they do not want people writing cross compilers that target the iPhone. Anyone is free to create a API layer over Cocoa.... weather it be in source or object form. I use several libraries in iphone projects. Most often xml, networking.
  9. Honestly I agree with some of the philosophical arguments being discussed here and elsewhere. However, I do not see what all the bitching is about. I can understand some people are pissed off sense they put in X months of Flash development in hopes that this avenue of development was coming in the next iteration of CS. I say hopes because that all it really was. Adobe never has nor will they ever control what gets put on the apple mobile platform (as is the case with anyone). Furthermore, It has been known for some time that Jobs is anti flash. This is not a big surprise they did this. Besides Adobe is working on Flash to HTML5. The initial presentations look promising. Then you can truly be multi-platform assuming the browsers are HTML5 compliant. If I develop for Android I use eclipse and java. If I develop for the upcoming windows phone I use VS and C#. If I develop for iProduct I use xCode and Objective-C. Do I have choices on the other platforms. Sure, and that is nice. But if I want to play in apples sand box I play by their rules. The same goes for MS, Google, the US government etc.... As to third party analytics. Apple is going into the mobile add business. This makes sense. First and foremost Apple is a business. They have shareholders. They are not in bis. to please you as a developer. Historically Apple has been shitty to their developers. Bottom line is Apple is going to do what Apple thinks is right for Apple. Not you or me or anyone else. John Gruber states most of my feelings more eloquently. another sane post edit: link addition.
  10. Quote:Original post by Hodgman Quote:Original post by OrangyTang Edit: I suspect there'll be a rush towards source-level cross compilation (ie. generating actual Obj-C code from ActionScript/Java/etc. as this would I suspect be undetectable by Apple and within the wording of the new agreement.Sounds like this would still violate "Applications that link to Documented APIs through an intermediary translation ... layer or tool are prohibited" -- translating AS/Java/etc into Obj-C is not allowed. Like you said, they might study these translation tools and look for tell-tale signs in your binaries, though that could possibly open them up to banning false-positives... Crazy New portion of Section 3.3.1 Applications must be originally written in Objective-C, C, C++, or javascript as executed by the iPhone OS WebKit engine, and only code written in C, C++, and Objective-C may compile and directly link against the Documented APIs (e.g., Applications that link to Documented APIs through an intermediary translation or compatibility layer or tool are prohibited). This does not explicitly or implicitly state what produces the Objective-C, C, C++ code. It is very arguable that it could be a machine. As long as the output from a translator can be run from the top down through the apple tool chain then you are fine. In this case the 'translator' is a generator. It is not an intermediary. It is not offering any API services to the client language. Moreover, they can not say it has to be produced by a human. Otherwise many of their own developer tools would violate the terms. Hell, GIMP would violate those terms if you saved an image as a C header. In practice it would be pointless to write a translator of this type. Now, this section does prevent you from creating a LLVM/GCC front end for Scheme that links it to the iPhone Cocoa API.
  11. I do not understand your mindset, and it's a bit hard to refrain from bluntly responding to your post. The only way you are screwed is if you are going to prison soon, or use alcohol/drugs on a daily basis. Is it going to be a little harder to get a regular 9 to 5. Sure. As others have stated or implied, hiring managers may ask you about this time gap. I recommend being honest. Lies have a way of coming to light when you work with people for a while. If you do lie keep the complexity of the lie to a minimum. You will need to maintain this lie until it becomes trivially excusable. Alpha_ProgDes mentioned rentacoder. Positives to rentacoder/odesk/etc.... 1. You can build a portfolio. 2. You may find a client that will rehire you outside of the meat shop. 3. In some cases the clients are software developers that do not want to do the 'grunt' work. You may find a job should they like you and your work. Negatives.... 1. Rentacoder and all the other places are meat shops. They are in business to skim money off the top of the winning bids. You need to account for this in your bids. 2. It is unlikely you will make a living working solely at one or more of these places. The top coders at these places are typically software shops. 3. You are competing against third world developers that can make a decent living working for the equivalent of minimum wage in the US. Hence, they will always underbid you. NEVER sell yourself short. You only hurt yourself and every other software developer. Advice in this respect... 1. Bid on project that interest you. By your own admission you are a procrastinator. Don't wast your clients time. 2. Don't bid high, but don't bid at the bottom of the barrel. Don't bid on something you know full and well you can not accomplish by the deadline. Don't be afraid to bid over the budget of a client. In many cases they purposely post $100 budgets to see how cheap they can get the job. 3. Explain exactly what it will take to build the system when bidding. The more clear and precise you can be the better. This is the most important part of the bid process. This is your 'job application'. Make it good. 4. Be as professional as possible, but don't be soulless. 5. Always ALWAYS multiply your ETD by at least 2. If you have not been developing anything in the past 4 years then multiply by 3 or more, or be prepared to work your ass off. If you have to increase the ETD then be prepared to reduce your bid. 6. Once you establish a client base or have a good portfolio, start bidding higher with options to negotiate. This is what I do. I generally bid 1.5 to 2 times what I want for the estimated time. Then I negotiate. Usually this means I get what I want and I get a percentage of the back end. 7. Never ever ever do a job for less money then you NEED. This whole freelance game is a balancing act in many dimensions. You have to pay taxes quarterly if you are a 1099 worker. You have to buy your own insurance. On and on. However, you are your own boss. Want to take a week off after a long job. Do it. Want to move to another state. Do it. All the freedom comes at a price. Be prepared for it. Most importantly you have to be motivated to do this. Flaking out at a job usually means you still get paid until you are fired. Flaking out on a client means you don't get paid at all, and in some cases sued. If freelance is something you pursue, don't hesitate to ask a few questions here. I know I will give advice when I can, and there are other freelancers on these boards that may help. Just make sure you are serious. Freelancing is not something you can do half ass. As I said earlier, I do not understand your mindset. I graduated 4 weeks ago. I have been working nonstop as a freelance programmer. However, this is a product of connections I had built over the years. All it takes is one good client (assuming you write quality software on time) to tell their colleges and you will be fine in the freelance game. Whatever you do I recommend you make a decision before you find yourself 30 years old and still sponging off your Dad.
  12. Quote:Original post by Wavarian The government has already admitted that the filter will be easily circumvented, but their argument is that shouldn't be a reason for doing nothing.. Stuff about good men yadayadayada.. I would hope in this case they don't build a fence with holes and then make it illegal to walk through them. If it is truly a simple filter 'for the kids' then why not just give away free filtering software and let the people decide that way. Anyway... I can't really comment to much on this. I hope it works out for all of you.
  13. That is terrible. What baffles me is government entities seem to not realize people can subvert these things rather easily. Even if they use deep packet inspection (very doubtful) you could still create encrypted tunnels to the outsize world. It is a waste of the peoples money if you ask me.
  14. Take a look at this post. Dynamic Loading in C CPluff
  15. Quote:Original post by Phlogiston I'm not eligible for any real financial aid because my crazy parents are semi-wealthy, but I do not live with them or receive any money from them. If you do not live with your parents, then they can not claim you as a dependent. Thus, you do not have to use them when applying for financial aid. The only factor should be how much you make. As long as there are no tax ties (dependent status claimed on you by anyone), then you are in the clear. Reapply and simply state you live on your own.