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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

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  1. You need a master server that keeps track of all the games currently running, if you want players to be able to browse a server list. If you're fine with players having to type in their IPs to join games, you don't need one. But that hasn't been fine since 1997. You could probably use an Amazon EC2 Micro instance to host a master server for free.
  2. Looks good guys. I'm curious, which networking engine are you using? I've found uLink to be outstanding.
  3. Do you want pure Newtonian spaceflight because you think it'll be more fun, or just because it's more realistic? Starting with realistic and trying to make it more fun is not the way to go. Start with fun and add realism where it makes the game better.
  4. In VIsual Studio, there's a linker option called "Link Library Dependencies" that should take care of this.
  5. C++ is not the best language for learning pointers and fiddling with bits - C is better for that. C++ is not the best language for learning object-oriented programming- C#/Java is better for that. C++ is the best language for learning C++.
  6. I agree with the OP's stance. Interest rates on government loans for high-demand education should be lower than those for low-demand education. Not the total amount of aid, but the interest rate. An Art History degree is a significantly riskier investment (in terms of being able to pay back the loan) than a Chemical Engineering degree. Rates should reflect that.
  7. Steve Jobs is definitely an outlier, in fact he was used as an example in the book. He was born the year before Gates. I'm not saying he wasn't a genius, just that he was perfectly positioned to launch the PC revolution out of his basement when he was 21. Had they been born 5 years earlier, they'd have already been working for IBM programming mainframes, married with kids by the time the PC was invented. Many factors need to come together for a true outlier (to change the world), but timing is the biggest.
  8. Of course, timing is everything. If you don't understand this, you should definitely give [url="http://www.amazon.com/Outliers-Story-Success-Malcolm-Gladwell/dp/0316017922"]Outliers[/url] a read. Just like Bill Gates and Steve Jobs, being born at the right time, in the right place, with access to the right resources is as (or more) important than raw talent. John Carmack is a textbook example. Do you think it's a coincidence that Carmack (iD), Tim Sweeney (Epic), Rob Pardo (Blizzard), Chris Roberts (Wing Commander) were all born in 1968-70? Old enough to make then 20-22 when OpenGL was created. You can see the same patterns if you go back to some of the pre-3D legends. Peter Molyneux (Lionhead), Will Wright (Maxis), Richard Garriot (Ultima), Gabe Newell (Valve), Scott Miller (Apogee)--all born in 1959-62. Old enough to make them 20-23 when the first IBM PC game out. I suspect you'll find simliar patterns if you go back to pre-PC developers. Sid Meier (Firaxis), Miyamoto (Nintendo), Ken WIlliams (Sierra) were born in 1952-54, making them (shocker) 22-24 when the Atari 2600 came out.
  9. [url="http://deltaengine.net/"]Delta Engine[/url] looks pretty damn awesome. It's developed by Benjamin Nitschke, the guy who wrote Professional XNA Programming as well as [url="http://www.exdream.com/Games/"]a slew[/url] of XNA games.
  10. Euler integration isn't exact, and neither are floating point numbers. Your distance is never going to be exactly 0. Instead of checking whether d > 0, check whether it's greater than some other minimum distance (the radius of your object is usually a good start). EDIT: Also consider that you are normalizing des and then multiplying by MAX_SPEED. So if you're less than 1 frame away from your destination, you'll overshoot.
  11. What method are you using to serialize/deserialize? By default .NET does not support circular references. Try using [url="http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms731073.aspx"]DataContractSerializer[/url] while setting [i]preserveObjectReferences[/i] to true.
  12. "I feel eating/feeding your character will become an interesting game mechanic" How is food different from weapons or armor? Assuming weapons/armor are craftable and decay with use/time, what does food crafting add? Friendly fire encourages teamwork and griefing, while discouraging new players and playing with strangers. In a competitive game with established teams (CS, Halo, Quake) you might want it. 'Realism' should not be an important factor in the decision.
  13. If you render the font into a bitmap (instead of using FreeType), then you can use any font you like.
  14. I'm making a 3D space combat demo, and I want to mimic Freelancer's mouse-driven control scheme. If you aren't familiar with it: you hold down a mouse button while your cursor moves freely around the screen, and the nose of your ship "follows" it. A spring camera keeps the ship within the boundaries of the screen. To do this, I use the normalized X/Y mouse controls to scale rotations around the ship's X/Y axes. This more or less works, but I get unintended rolling that makes the controls unintuitive. The part I'm having trouble with is managing the ship's roll. While I have explicit roll controls, I'd like for beginners to not have to use them, and have the ship's roll managed for them. When the player moves their mouse to the right edge of the screen, the ship should roll say 30 degrees and then rotate around its starting Up vector. Also, when a player shops steering (lets go of the mouse button), the ship should roll back to it's starting Up vector. Does anyone have any info on this?
  15. I use this to generate floats +-1 [code]float sfrand( int *seed ) { float res; seed[0] *= 16807; *((unsigned int *) &res) = ( ((unsigned int)seed[0])>>9 ) | 0x40000000; return( res-3.0f ); }[/code] [url=http://www.iquilezles.org/www/articles/sfrand/sfrand.htm]Source[/url]