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  1. A 3D shooter requires 3d artists, animators and sound engineer. Good day. The project is unequivocally non-profit and applicable to such tasks: - go through the entire sequence of the project’s release in Steam, - get the project in the portfolio - Practice low-budget indie marketing. - game development skills upgrade ) And all this - with a minimum budget. The game is done on Unity. Some free content assets from the asset store. Many of them are highly modified. All code is mine. The plot and setting of the shooter is based on the comic strip by Alexadr Dyakov "Owl - is an effective manager. The Hare from the comic strip will act as the protagonist. His opponents: jerboas, raccoons, bats, wolves (as the most guards and security forces of the owl) and owls themselves. Duration of the game - 5 locations (Forest, Plant, Offices, Snow-capped mountains, Desert). 2-3 hours of gameplay. The emotional goal of the game is to respond to the experiences that arise when reading a comic book.)) The use of characters and several pages of the comic book has already been agreed with the author of the comic book. Game Features: - "dismembered" - you can shoot \ tear off an enemy limb, tail or head (which is lethal, of course). Also, the "fifth point" (ass) is vulnerable for some enemies. - several types of weapons for making "meat": fork, axe, chainsaw, flamethrower, grenade launcher, machine gun, double-barreled shotgun and one futuristic weapon avaliable close to the end of the game - a lot of blood and violence - high game dynamics (not DOOM but... )) - the possibility of attacks from the back, which provides the mechanics of "silent killings" - enemies have a limited view, and respond to sounds - weather system (snow, rain, fog, thunderstorm, wind), change of time of day - localization of hits and change in the behavior of opponents, depending on their condition. We trying to make it cheap (in development), simple and fun as possible. At the moment, alpha version of game is already ready. All described features of the game are implemented already. Current development status: - game mechanics (moving, interacting, shooting, damage models) - READY - UI - READY - metagaming (purchase of weapons and ammunition between locations, briefing and debriefing) - READY - AI of opponents (attacks, evasion, player search, reactions to changes in the situation, state of stunning, etc.) - READY - first location (passage scenario, content, level design, cut scenes) - READY - rest of locations - WIP the software part is 95% complete. Polishing gameplay, optimizing and bug fixing in progress. The following specialists are invited to the project enthusiastically: 1. Sound-designer 2. 3D artists (modelers) - enviroment props 3. 3D Animators - there are 4 characters need to be animated Planned Steam release - september-october 2019.
  2. Test build from 11 september 2019. Download link Build includes full first location, one half of second location. There are two languages supported: english and russian. Input (controller's) settings - works from in-game Settings-screen only. Video settings - from Unity start window for now. This window will be turned off in fufture. Download format - RAR-archive, simply unpack to any folder and run OwlShooter.exe. Platform: Windows x64 Needs an active steam client. I'm waiting a feedback and error logs. Error log will be: "SYSTEM DRIVE":\Users\"YOUR ACC NAME"\AppData\LocalLow\Homeship Ind_\OwlShooter\output_log.txt Video of previous build:
  3. So to give a bit of context as to what i'm trying to achieve and where i seem to be failing at: I'm currently implementing an SSAO approach which requires me to reconstruct the viewspace position from the depth buffer. The depth is encoded into an RGB (24 bit) texture. (As i can't access the depth buffer directly.) To prepare for depth reconstruction i inverse the projection matrix: (and i think herein lies the issue: ) Now, i noticed that there is an issue with the reconstructed depth component in the shader. So in DirectX, +Z goes towards the screen while -Z goes into the distance (effectively reversed compared to OpenGL) However, after hours of debugging i simply tried to render the sign of the Z coordinate. And this is the result: For some reason, the Z coordinate is positive (up until a point) which is shown as the green coloring in the scene. And after that it becomes red (where z becomes negative). From my understanding it should be all red (as the Z component should start to be negative from the cameras origin point.) (The encoding/decoding of RGB values was tested and shouldn't be the culprit.) Has anyone an idea/direction as to what the issue could be? (I think that maybe the conversion process for the inversion call might be the cause of this?. Or maybe the reconstruction in the shader is wrong?)
  4. I've just completed a 3700x build and looking to purchase a monitor and graphics card.I'm currently torn between 5700xt + free sync or saving a little and getting G-sync + 2070 Super. I'm a bit confused with free sync as a lot of the monitors only allow free sync in the 35-90hz zone? Could someone explain to me the differences, the pro's and cons and help me match a monitor and card. When it comes to Nvidia cards, I'm unsure what brand to go for, MSI Trio is over £150 cheaper than the ASUS equivalent and Gigabyte GeForce RTX 2070 Super Gaming OC 3x 8G is almost £200 cheaper that the ASUS. My preference is 27" non-curved 1440p VA or IPS panel. I'm not interested in TN.
  5. Hello, Everyone! I created skeleton program QT5 + BGFX framework. I do not use QT3D. BGFX supports DX9, DX11, DX12, OpenGL, Vulkan, Metal - https://github.com/bkaradzic/bgfx My basic initialization is quite simple: void* native_window_handle = reinterpret_cast<void*>(main_window.centralwidget->winId()); bgfx::Init init; init.type = bgfx::RendererType::OpenGL; // Or Direct3D9 or Direct3D11 init.vendorId = BGFX_PCI_ID_NONE; init.resolution.width = width; init.resolution.height = height; init.resolution.reset = reset; init.platformData.nwh = native_window_handle; bgfx::init(init); However, I have the following problem: 3D rendering area is flicking \ blinking. Especially on OpenGL renderer. I put my skeleton program to GitHub - https://github.com/PetrPPetrov/bgfx-qt5-win - requires to have a valid QT5 library, CMake. Could somebody try my application skeleton and make a suggestion? Thank you very much!
  6. Trexioas Xavier

    OpenGL How was VGUI made?

    Valve made their own GUI library called VGUI. I am wondering how were they able to make their GUI library and what methods they used to make it. Did they use Win32 API or something else. Is there an open source code for VGUI? Please answer these questions and help me out as much as you can.
  7. From Epistory to Nanotale When we released our first game Epistory, we wanted to do something different from what you could find on the market. One of the ideas was to create a typing game. We didn’t know if there was an audience for it, as many people associated typing to educational games such as Mavis Beacon Teaches Typing or Mario Teaches Typing. When we tried some typing games and discovered such alien games as Typing of The Dead, we found out that typing could be fun if well executed. We created a prototype of Epistory that is still playable here but keep in mind that it’s really barebone, and no artist was involved (it’s made with the Construct 2 engine). After that point, development restarted from scratch, with a different engine (Unity 3D), but with all the experience we gathered from the prototype. We put all our efforts into what was intended to be an adventure game with a typing mechanic. After a year of development, we released the game on Steam in March 2016, and the game has an overwhelmingly positive rating now. To be honest, creating Nanotale was not a part of our plan. But, we received a lot of requests from the community asking us to create a new typing game. They asked for an Epistory 2. We thought a bit about it and asked them with a survey of how they would like their new typing game. The answers were quite interesting and diversified but they all agreed on one thing: They wanted it to be Epistory but better. A New Look for a New Game Finding the right art style for Nanotale was probably the biggest challenge in that production. Our community loved the art style of Epistory so much that they specifically asked us not to change it. That art style is somehow linked to the story of Epistory, we decided to do the same for Nanotale, and that the new story required its own style. We wanted Nanotale to be different from its predecessor, with a new story, new gameplay elements, new characters, and a brand new art style. All while keeping the elements that our community loved so much: something unique and poetic. Epistory - Typing Chronicles (screenshot from the Shattered Isles) Nanotale - Typing Chronicles (screenshot from the Ancestral Forest) A Long Road Searching for The One A never-ending journey brought us from the first art iteration to the final look of Nanotale, starting with these two concept arts. Back then, we were searching for a poetic mood in a fantastic world and didn’t know that they would inspire us for the second biome of the game. What really caught our interest at that point was the use of contrast between areas of light and darkness; a game made of chiaroscuro. Based on these concepts, we took the first screenshots of the game and shared a few online. But they felt too classic. That was not what we wanted: not poetic enough, not recognizable enough. They could have been from any other game out there. So we went back to the drawing board, trying to find the right tone, the perfect light. We wanted to give Nanotale its own visual identity. When our 2D artist created those, we knew that we had found the right color scheme for our game: something pastel and dark, moody and bright at the same time. After that, the challenge was to convey that ambiance to the art style we would have in the game. How to inject Epistory’s soul in that new art style while being fresh and new? What made Epistory unique for the players? Was it the papercraft/origami? Was it the paintings from the meta-story? Having a look back at our first game gave us the idea to make Nanotale a watercolor painting. The watercolor painting was a great idea for the still images but Nanotale is a 3D game. To make watercolor in 3D, we found a 3D model on Sketchfab that was amazing and that inspired us the technique. A 3D Watercolor Art Style For modelization, we keep in mind that we want something low poly, but we don’t hesitate to put more polygons where we need them, like on the characters or the ground. For the rocks and plants, we keep a very low poly count, and we play with the ambient occlusion to create nice volumes. The textures are also very important in our process: we work with watercolor brushes to put some colors. Then we refine the details with strokes to better understand the shape and add some complexity. We never use a normal map or specular because we want to keep full control of the final look of every asset. Depending on the asset, we sometimes bake the low poly mesh on itself and get some information like the ambient occlusion that we use as a base for the texture. How we create textures in Nanotale The first scene we created to test the art style A Magical Decoration Process In our decoration process, we use home-made Houdini digital assets (HDA) to quickly generate rock walls, forest patches or ground platforms. These HDA take time to prepare but the procedural workflow allows us to save time on building environments, so we can spend more time on decoration details to make every screen unique and mastered. Besides the natural environment, we also worked on the city of the second biome. Once the concept is done, the first draft we do in 3D is for the volume blocking. The complexity of the city makes it harder to edit than any other environment. Starting with a solid base is important as we are working with a lot of small pieces to build the houses. Concept art of the city from the Sunken Caves First 3D draft of the city In Nanotale, we are not working with a high-poly model or normal map in the material, so it's important to create a small scene quickly with our low poly assets to see how it looks like before starting the texturing. We first validate the modelization, then work on the texture where we add more details. The mix of tileable and trim textures allows us to avoid having too many specific and individual textures. The lighting is done, while we are still tweaking the texture to make sure we have the perfect result we everything comes together. The finished city in the game The in-game city used to create our Steam banner Imparting Life with Houdini We want the animations to be short and with a cartoon feeling, so they are readable with the camera view we have in-game. That cartoon feeling requires flexibility for some bouncy animations that impact the creation of the rig. After doing the rigging part and setting the list of animations we want per character, we first do the animation that best conveys the character’s intention. That reference animation defines the expected mood of the character. In our animation process, we define the main poses of the animation. Then, we play with the timeline to adjust the timing. This has to be done right because after this step it's more difficult to re-adjust the timing. Our animations have three phases: Anticipation Action Return to the main Pose To have a quick and responding animation we have to cut the anticipation and try to put it at the end. The best impact is achieved with a quick start and a long reception with some bounciness. When we have good timing, we start editing the curve to fluidify animation and do some adjustments. The main goal is not to have a pure polished animation but to have all the animations set in rough mode. It’s crucial to test quickly the entire flow of the animation tree in Unity, to see if it's already readable, looks nice, and is understandable, before starting polishing and adding details. When all the animations are working, it’s important to take a break and work on other things, and come back later to rework on them with a clear mind. The polished animation after a refreshing break A Peculiar Game Mechanic Because the game uses a keyboard to control everything (besides basic movement), typing mechanics need to be convenient to use and not too restricting. It is frustrating to feel forced to use a keyboard for something that could be more easily controlled with a mouse or a gamepad (which is why you still move with WASD). So we try to keep all the typing related to the action performed: combining magic words to cast a spell, typing keywords to select a dialog topic or to write lore in your notebook. Occasionally, for controls that are not used all the time, we allow ourselves to use fun controls based on keyboard patterns rather than actual words. When we ask players to type more words and faster, putting them under pressure in a battle, it gives the satisfying feeling of defeating something that seemed really hard, but that is made easier because of your muscle memory (sometimes you lose, of course, but my point is that most players underestimate their typing skills). Unfortunately, we cannot make the typing controls deeper than that. When you challenge typing on something else than speed or accuracy, it becomes really tedious and frustrating. (We tried typing slowly, typing in rhythm, typing non-English words, typing symbols…). Because the typing mechanics have to stay simple, the game design is composed of simple typing-based gameplays, connected together in a systematic way. For example, typing a spell is simple, but the different combinable keywords allow for multiple approaches to each situation. The Real Challenge is Coming Nanotale is out in early access since the 23rd of October 2019, and there are a lot of things that need to be done before releasing the final game. We are happy about what we released so far even if multiple aspects of the game required a lot of iterations, and we hope that the community will enjoy the game. I think that dealing with the early access and the development will be the biggest challenge so far. Thank you for reading.