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Found 202 results

  1. This is the 1st game we built by Cocos Creator! We need your feedback about this game on: Is this game fun? How is the graphic performance (laggy?) How can we improve the game? https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/color-block-game/id1347502739?ls=1&mt=8 Thank you =) App Preview - Color Block - 886x1920.mp4
  2. Advice Beginner? Sure

    I make a game on my own. I do not use forums (until now) or social media programs to talk about it, I just do it. So the problem is: I finished the game, I published the game for android, no one (ok, 3 persons) check the game. So I see 2 possibilities: either the game is really, really bad (I suck) or I have no idea how to promote my game (this one is true for sure). I really think the game is rather fun but maybe I completely wrong. So, how the hell I check if my game is good or not and how the hell can I do some little promotion of my game for free. I would stop caring about the game if the game is really bad, but I sincerely think it is not. I would be grateful if someone post an opinion about this. Thanks.
  3. Unreal Beginning to make games

    i am just starting to learn c++ and i want to know exactly which free engine will be okay for a beginner to make games
  4. Hello, I am rewriting my pixel art game program and have decided to support the following resolutions: 1920 x 1080 1280 x 720 1024 x 768 I think they all look fine on the different sized monitors. Does anyone have an opinion of any other needed resolution to support? When I started this research I seem to recall a general response of it might be just important to have the aspect ratios. What does this mean exactly? Why? Thank you, Josheir
  5. The Toronto Game Jam is opening for registration later this year. I'm hoping to participate again since it's been a great experience every time. As of last year myself and a friend have participated in the Toronto Game Jam three times. The event, also known as TOJam, has developers come together at George Brown College for three days of manic development of crazy game ideas. Participating in a jam can be overwhelming but also rewarding and fun as hell. Over the last few events I've had things go right and things go wrong. Here are some tips to help avoid some of the worse pitfalls that you can hit during a jam. Tip 1: Know what you're going to make in advance At TOJam you have from Friday at 10:00AM until Sunday at 6:00PM to create your game. While you don't need things to be set in stone you should know that you're making a puzzle game and if will be based on sliding tiles or stacking blocks. If you don't know what you want to make then you'll be using up your time figuring out what to do instead of doing it. The week before the game jam we take our one or two paragraph "elevator pitch" and write a simple list of what needs to exist to fulfill that pitch. We then refine that list into a detailed set of tasks we want to complete on each day of the jam. With the list we can grab work as it's ready and keep dead time minimal. Tip 2: Know what features you can drop Murphy's law always strikes. Something goes wrong and suddenly the deadline is looming. When figuring out what to do for the game you should have some idea of what features you can drop without ruining it. Generally this list will be very short but it's always handy to have if you fall behind schedule. Making a list of optional features is also a good gut-check on whether you've got a realistic schedule. If the list is long then your project is probably too large. A schedule that feels like it has too little work on each day is better than one with too much. You can always add work and scope to a project while you're working on it. It's much harder to cut scope down when you're running out of time. Tip 3: Balance your workload between team members If you're jamming solo you don't have to worry about this. If not it's critical that everyone has something to do. One trick is to have broad but shallow task trees. If C depends on B which depends on A then they can only be done by one person. Sure you could work on A then your partner can work on B but you can't work on C while your partner works on B. A way of fixing this is adjusting your design so B and C depend on A but not on each other. From a coding perspective using interfaces and loose coupling helps a lot. In our latest jam, TOJam 12, we had a number of lethal hazards which could be activated by a button. In the bad case character death would depend on development of some arbitrary hazard which would depend on implementing the button to activate it. To avoid this we set up the button with two observable events, OnPressed and OnReleased and gave the player character a "Killed" method. By having a simple interface everything that was activated by the button could be developed independently. By having the "Killed" method player death could be written independently from any specific way of killing the player. Another trick is to group your tasks into distinct streams. During the start of TOJam 12 I developed the base skeleton of the game while my team mate whiteboxed levels. The only dependency here was that I needed at least one level to load to start the game which was done well before I needed it. Later on I worked on handling player death while my teammate composed the title theme song for the game. Tip 4: Have a library of game creation tools in advance When jamming it's important to always be working on the game you want to make. The last thing you should be doing during a game jam is building a tile map editor. In TOJam 11 we lost about four hours to writing input handling code for a twin stick shooter. That took away time from more important tasks like generating bullet patterns, spawning enemies and so on. Tip 5: Minimize the number of variables the game's design I'm not a professional game designer so I'm not sure if "variable" is the right word. What I refer to is a thing that can be changed to alter the feel and balance of a game. The speed of a character, enemy hit points, number of enemies, how often they shoot, how often you shoot and so on. All of these variables add complexity to the process of making a game "feel" the way it should. Having lots of low hitpoint enemies could make you feel powerful. Having a few high hitpoint enemies would feel quite different. Having lots of high hitpoint enemies could make the game feel dangerous, scary or simply unfair. In all these cases I'm only changing two variables, the number of enemies and their hitpoints. At TOJam 11 we produced a twin stick shooter called MANT: The Man Ant. The twist is that the bullet patterns would be generated procedurally. This also was the biggest headache. Pattern generation worked but it was extremely unbalanced. Sometimes patterns would be pathetically easy. Sometimes the game would produce enormous unavoidable walls of gigantic bullets. We burned up at least half a day trying to get a consistent and fun difficulty curve but still had huge differences between sessions. The game was a "finished" working product but it wasn't very fun. Our next project was a puzzle platformer built around using dead bodies left behind when your character dies to reach different goals. Variables are generally level specific and mostly independent. Things like how quickly a door should close or how often a gun should fire. Tweaking still took around half a day but we stopped tweaking because we were done rather than being out of time. ToJam Specific Extra If you're driving from another city don't forget to take traffic into account. The 401 and Gardiner Expressway are infamous for a reason. Related Links Toronto Game Jam website Our TOJam 11 project (not a great game in my opinion) Our TOJam 12 project (you can find more details on how the jam went in the development log)
  6. Workflow help

    I am starting my first serious game in a LONG time and would like help in remembering and setting up my workflow. I have an outline of my idea and have chosen two engines to test for best function. I am refreshing my programming skills. What I need now is some help deciding what to do first, then next, etc. Initially it will be a two person work group with my wife as the resident artist (although I think I will be buying sprites and world art to speed things up). I will be doing the heavy lifting as programmer and project manager. HELP!!! and thank you in advance.
  7. Two software questions

    Hey, I've got two software questions. I thought about posting in the engines/middleware forum, but I'm not really sure this fits there. 1. I'm about ready to start investing tiny amounts of money into what I'm doing and I'm thinking of purchasing Unity's Adventure Game Creator. Ofcourse it's all glowing reviews over there, but I was wondering if there was anybody on here that's been hands on and has something to say about it. 2. I've got this cheap-ass ASUS tablet lying around doing exactly nothing and I figured I could repurpose it from doorstop to doodlepad. Admittedly I'm going about this the wrong way around, asking here before googling properly, but I'm curious what your software of choice would be. I'm just gonna try to do some concepts and placeholder stuff. I saw Photoshop Sketch in a top 10, which interests me, as I know Photoshop... Regular already. Not important anymore. The afformentioned tablet is too shite to do anything good so I've settled for a program that did work on it, the quasi pornographically titled MediBang Paint. It's good enough for me. Anyway, thanks for your time and tolerance.
  8. Game Combat Mechanic Examples

    I'm asking something a bit different for this forum. I've noticed many questions in this forum ask something like, "is X a good idea?" What I'd like to see is examples of how other people did similar things to what I want to do, and maybe some suggestions for what would be best. Basically I'm trying to create a game where you play as a bandit leader, and you set up ambushes for various travelers, ala Robin Hood, but with a bit less giving to people other than yourself. The game I envision has you managing equipment, bandits, and location to increase the success of these ambushes. Therein lies the problem, I'm not sure how to set up a deep system like that. It's not that I lack ideas, but that I am unsure how to refine it down, and translate my idea into actual game mechanics. Part of it is, while I'm a fan of RPGs, I don't really know how they work. I've never exactly been a minmaxer and while I understand more armor is reduces damage, more attack increase hit-chance etc. I don't really understand how these systems work in detail, and I don't know how to find out. So my question is, how can I find out about these systems so I can modify them to suit what I want to do?
  9. I am looking to learn C++ in Unreal so have commenced the tutorial '3rd Person Battery Collector Power Up Game'. It is on the 3rd video of the series that I have come across an issue. In the screenshot I have attached labelled 'picture 1', this is the tutors class which is correct. My screenshot 'picture 2' is where I see some issues. - my #include is in a grey colour font. It should be red right? - I also do not have a #include "BatteryCollector.h" in my class also. In the tutors example this line of code is present. Can anyone help me with why I have these issues. I am using Visual Studio 2015 as well. I thought would using VS'17 help so I installed this today. I have yet to try this out with that though but then I thought. Shouldn't it work fine on VS'15 anyway, would using VS'17 make much difference at all. I am very keen to work through this tutorial today so if the forum might be able to help me I would be so so grateful. Thank you.
  10. Greetings to you all, I intend to build a 3D engine in C++ (I'm experienced with C++) targeting PC (OpenGL for sure and maybe Direct3D too), mostly as a hobby and to learn how it works at a low level. I've done some research and come up with these two books: 3d math primer for Graphics and Game Development (2nd edition) Game Engine Architecture (2nd edition), By Jason Gregory Also at first I want to use an existing physics engine like physx or bullet and then maybe go for developing my own one later after I put the rest of my engine together. Now since for sure there are a lot of experienced people here I want to ask you which other books/resources do you recommend I study to help me implement my engine.
  11. Am a new game dev and I need the help of you (the experts) While making the game I had one main problem, In my game, the player moves his mouse to control the direction of a sword that his character is supposed swings against other players, the problem is that I don't know how to program the hand to move according to the mouse. I will be grateful if someone can give me a helping hand on how to code it or a general idea of how this thing can be programmed on unity ^^.
  12. Hello everyone! I'm a junior composer who's been creating his own stuff for around 3 years now. I've recently decided whole-heartily to compose game music. However, I don't have very many songs that I've made by myself (around 13) so I was wondering, should I build up my portfolio of songs more or use what I have and learn integrating my music with Wwise or FMod? I also want to start collaborating soon, so is right now the perfect time to start doing that? Any advice or suggestions are greatly appreciated.
  13. This is linked to another question that I asked here a couple of days ago: I'm looking at making a client-server game with a game server programmed in Java. The game will be a 2D turn-based game (like a board game), with a maximum of around 50-100 games going on at any one time. So, the performance requirements are not very high. The reason I would like to use Java for the server are because I already have some familiarity with it and I would like the server to not be tied to one particular platform. I would also like to design it so that the client interface to the server is as generic as possible, so that the same server could be used with multiple different clients. For example, there might be a web-based client, or someone else might design a stand-alone 3D client application later on, using the same server. So, I am looking for some advice on where to start with this, as I have very little experience with coding servers. I was planning to use web sockets for the client-server connection, which apparently uses Java EE (Enterprise Edition), which seems to require the use of the GlassFish server. However, I have been advised that a fully-fledged application server, like GlassFish, may be overkill for a game server. So, here are my questions: Should I use something like GlassFish? Does it makes sense for the type of game server I am describing? If not, then what sort of networking protocol/library would experienced Java game designers recommend? Are there any existing, general-purpose Java game servers that exist, which I might be able to use as a starting point? (Or even free software/open-source client-server games?) Or, should I look at coding my own game server from scratch? In which case, again, what sort of connection type/library would be recommended? Does anyone know of any suitable introductory tutorials that deal with how to make this sort of game server in Java? I guess my priority is probably minimizing the learning curve and the amount of time/effort involved, over performance. How much effort is this sort of undertaking going to require? Thanks in advance! :-)
  14. Help With Story-Driven Game Concept

    I'm very much a beginner when it comes to game development. I'm merely trying to come up with a concept at this point for a project later in life. I would like constructed input, opinions, and criticism that will help me fix things wrong with my concept in mind. I've loved story-driven games, and have always thought about making one. I'm not the most colourful crayon in the box, so I find it difficult to come up with appealing storylines that are well designed for a video game and not a written novel. I've came up with several story concepts that I feel may be suitable for games, but for this thread, I'll only explain 1. Please respond with things that I should add, remove, or fix. I want this to be a story-based game, obviously. I'm not sure if I want to create a game that looks like an old-school RPG game, a 2D sidescroller, a click-to-select, or any other media I happen to think of. I feel it wouldn't be good to make it a first-person perspective game, because that is usually used for gameplay purposes in survival games, shooters, and other games including first-person fighting, which, being a story-driven game, this concept does not have. The protagonist is this kid that's around 20 years old that has seemingly dropped out of high school before the game's story takes place. Despite this, he's intelligent and classy, and is able to live comfortably in his own apartment; he even has his own job at a nearby bookstore, where he makes decent money. You figure this all out around the time you begin playing. After a while you notice that the protagonist is dealing with strong grief and sadness; could this be the reason he dropped out? But, what could it be? This idea begins to grow itself into the player, but, as the player continues playing normally- meeting some of the protagonist's old friends, learning more about them- they begin to forget about the protagonist's depressed state. This is then brought back after a while of exploring the town and coming back to your apartment to rest. After doing so, the player is dropped into this "dream" first appearing to be your normal residence, but slowly becomes distorted over a few minutes until you realize where you are. You can't seem to wake up. This can be done a few sections later when you receive a necklace given to you by a dubbed "imaginary friend" from your childhood that appears in the dream. You can use this to your advantage if you need something to complete an area that is in the real world, shop for new items, or complete a day of work at the bookshop in exchange for currency. Doing so can and will affect the way you perceive the dream world; dreams are never the exact same. Enemies can become more difficult, an area can become more distorted, dialogue may change, tiles may switch, and you may lose or receive items. The amount of times you transfer between realms will affect the outcome towards the end; not by a lot. Only things such as dialogue, characters, and the attitude that characters have toward you will change. The game will consist of a tutorial character that is seemingly a normal-looking person. Of course, since the world becomes more distorted throughout the dream, the leading characters/bosses will also become more and more bizarre and hostile-seeming throughout the areas leading up to the end of the game, where you discover the true background of the protagonist and the reality of the real world; the character was born with a mental illness that allows them to create a different 'world' to cope with trauma, and has morphed the real world into their own perception of a normal life, where they only have to deal with the grief hinted at towards the beginning of the game (the death of their mother). Though reality is actually very terrible; they realizes that the world is filled with horrible death, destruction, and peril that is not only being dealt with by them. This realization causes them to revert their perception or the real world back to this insane nuclear wasteland full of sorrow. They can't find any of their "friends" and can't go back to the dream world, because none of them were real; they were made up by them to cope with their mother's passing. The wasteland is also a perception by him, but it's much more realistic, figuratively speaking. The message from this is that no matter what your issue is, almost everyone else has, is, and will deal with the exact same thing that you are. There is so much bad in the world, so much death, and so many horrible things that you don't notice. So, you need to stop wallowing in self-pity and fix it yourself, because no one else is going to. They have their own problems to deal with. Please respond with constructive feedback and advice. Tell me what to add, take away or fix. Thank you for taking your time to read this.
  15. Over the last week I have released my first prototype for free public download. Great... However, It has very quickly become clear that their is a trust issue surrounding releasing my work, and I understand the concern. I have worked very hard to make the install process simple for the user. Just like games I would install myself, mine offers an installer which guides the user to install the prototype and ensures system dependencies are met. This brings the setup to a single .exe file that can be easily distributed and downloaded. Here is the problem; although the game page gets attention, more than one person has indicated that they find deployment in this way to look suspicious. What's more, Windows also doesn't help- it too warns it's suspicious. However, so far it appears that my release through itch.io (indie steam) is being trusted more, but I don't see much difference. Again, at the end of the day, itch is just installing the exe for the user, the only difference is that the user may only see a nice image and an install button through the itch app. So, what would be a good way to release closed source software which inspires trust in people? In the past I have had to use code signing for client work, but as far as I can see that just boils down to: If you pay some money, you become trusted. In my experience, there is no review of the code of any kind. Is it purely the alignment with a larger company that makes people trust the itch.io release over my direct download? How can an individual be trusted?
  16. Hi All, Im running through some video tutorials in C# as im newbie. One thing im doing is adding lots of comments to the code so I can go back and revisit the code later and know exacly what is going on. What id also like to do is store the code snippets in an easy to find place so I can reuse/analyse them later. I kind of just want a long scrolling page with all my code and commented snippets on that I can use as reference later which also maintains the snippet format and is of course searchable. There seems to be a few apps as well as Git Hub etc to store code snippets but im just wondering which one from a newbie perspective works best for you and why? Kind Regards, John
  17. I've attempted to build a game engine in the past and eventually realized that was a lot more work than I would ever have time to finish. Went to college and started working fulltime as a software developer which ate up all my time. I eventually had some money saved up and just decided I would quit my job and focus on building a game in Unity3D. I managed to make a significant amount of progress and almost have a playable game, however, I ran out of money and had to start working again... SInce then I haven't had time or the drive to start working on the game again and it's just sitting there in its partially complete state collecting dust. Has anyone been able to build a successful game while working a full-time job? If so, how did you do it?
  18. Hi! As many beginners here, I want to ask a little bit subjective question. But first of all, I will share my story with you. I used Java for something like 2 years now, I consider myself quite a proficient Java programmer. I've created a chess game using pure Java (probably the worst quality of code I've ever written tbh). Now, I'm looking to develop myself further. I've read a lot of articles about it, even asked a few questions by myself. But now, I'm even more confused than I was at the beginning. From many tips I got, I thought the best way for further development would be learning C++, then using SFML library (or something similar) for some time, and then at last learning C#/staying with C++ by using an engine like Unity or Unreal - I'm quite unsure with the choice in last step, but that's not the point now. Currently, I'm learning C++. Honestly, I'm not feeling this language as much, as I feel Java (doing the same simple tasks in Java take me much less time than in C++). More honestly, I would abandon it and go straight to C#. Is it worth to lose my nerves for C++ these times? I'm aiming for professional career in future (so in about 5-6 years I guess). I know, that the best way of learning to make games is to make games etc, the language doesn't matter etc, you don't have to explain me this subject. Summarizing what I am actually up to, I want to know, if learning C++ is still a better idea than learning C# for game-dev nowadays? I don't want to feel stupid in your eyes. I'm just feeling really confused and lost in tons of people own opinions and tips, that I had to ask more experienced developers. Thanks for your answer and sorry for actually wasting your time reading all of this.
  19. Hi, I am new to programming, and would like to make a baseball sim engine. I was wondering what software/language I should use to create this? Any other help/tips/advice is very much appreciated. Thanks in advance.
  20. Hi everyone, my name is Gabriel and this is my first post here. I graduated from college over three years ago with a degree in Physics and now I want to start a career as a gameplay programmer. Besides a single C++ programming class in college I have not had any prior experience programming. What I have done to learn until now is to use SFML to recreate Arkanoid and Space Invaders. My question is, am I on the right track if I just continue creating games from scratch using libraries such as SFML or would I benefit more if I move on to using an engine such as Unreal or Unity? Also, of how much help (if any) would my degree be when trying to join a team? I live in San Diego, CA if that matters at all. I do appreciate in advance any guidance anyone could offer me.
  21. Advice Getting started

    Hi, I’m starting out in game development as a whole and while I have some experience with programming in the past with small things like mods and a single byond game that I took over for a previous person I’m rather new to the start from the ground up thing. im looking to get some advice on where to start for tools/material/resources for such. I already have the core concept for the game hashed out, this has been a relitivly solo thing so far so any help is appreciated thank you.
  22. I want to make a html5 canvas / javascript game, similar to agar.io. I know a little node.js, and I think I understand the way online multiplayer works, but now that I do understand I realize it's gonna be a ton of work if I want to do it from the ground up with something like socket.io. My question is: are there libraries that can help with the multiplayer aspects of my game (sending game packets, etc.), and if so, is the performance for that library fast enough to run my game? (has a latency at least as low as agar.io)
  23. I'm kinda stuck on a puzzle. Usually I'd now tell you what the puzzle was and ask for a walkthrough, but my problem is that the puzzle doesn't even exist yet. Been googling around a bit for helpful info, but I mainly end up on Ron Gilbert's site and he isn't helping much either on this specific point and I'm wasting valuable writing time looking for a solution. Problem is that I don't wanna do another "get item here/use item there" puzzle. I've got enough of that and there will be more. To add some variation I wanna try and do a different style of puzzle, a lever puzzle, or a mechanical puzzle, but that leads me to a way of thinking I can't seem to do. Here's the specific situation: I need a bunch of ostriches out of my way. They're on an ostrich farm and they get fed every day at five pm exactly. So I'll need to head into the church tower and make the bell ring five times. I'm thinking this needs to be done with a mechanism I could manipulate in a puzzly manner. Getting a hammer and banging the bell is too easy. The game doesn't work with actual time, so going all Medjay and meditate till five o' clock isn't an option. That bell's gonna need to ring five times, wether it's three or not. I already have access to the church tower, so that can't be puzzlefied and I can bullshit my way through most incosistencies, so adding a space age computer to a medieval belltower is actually an option if need be. I'm looking for someone who can point me to either a useful resource or someone who imagines stuff like this better than I do. Oh, and pretending there will actually some day be a point that credits will roll: You will be credited if you please.
  24. Hey guys! First post here So like the post title reads, I'm looking for some feedback on a few electronic tracks as well as some advice on where to begin with networking (specifically, contacting indie devs about getting some music placed without coming off as a lame solicitor). I've seen a few "work" sections on this site and other similar ones, but none of them really seem to have anything remotely helpful in terms of music - or maybe I just suck at using the search tool? I've also taken to twitter and acquired a fair amount of followers, but I'm not getting the results I want, mainly being conversations with people who are working on games (even minimal budget indie games) about scoring. Any helpful advice would be greatly appreciated! And lastly, here are three tracks I'd really appreciate some feedback on! Mostly about mix and composition. I know the master levels are a little low, and I prefer to keep it that way and retain full dynamic range. Thank goodness the loudness wars are over haha. Tension track: https://soundcloud.com/spacepengu/farewell-sleep Guitar & synth track: https://soundcloud.com/spacepengu/guitar-synth Chill / relaxing electronic track: https://soundcloud.com/spacepengu/chill-space-92816-439-am Thanks so much guys, looking forward to reading your replies!
  25. I'm nearly finishing my Pong game, and I was wondering if I should encapsulate things such as physics, rendering, sound, in such a small game.
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