Jump to content
  • Advertisement

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Advice'.

The search index is currently processing. Current results may not be complete.


More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Categories

  • Audio
    • Music and Sound FX
  • Business
    • Business and Law
    • Career Development
    • Production and Management
  • Game Design
    • Game Design and Theory
    • Writing for Games
    • UX for Games
  • Industry
    • Interviews
    • Event Coverage
  • Programming
    • Artificial Intelligence
    • General and Gameplay Programming
    • Graphics and GPU Programming
    • Engines and Middleware
    • Math and Physics
    • Networking and Multiplayer
  • Visual Arts
  • Archive

Categories

  • Audio
  • Visual Arts
  • Programming
  • Writing

Categories

  • Game Developers Conference
    • GDC 2017
    • GDC 2018
  • Power-Up Digital Games Conference
    • PDGC I: Words of Wisdom
    • PDGC II: The Devs Strike Back
    • PDGC III: Syntax Error

Forums

  • Audio
    • Music and Sound FX
  • Business
    • Games Career Development
    • Production and Management
    • Games Business and Law
  • Game Design
    • Game Design and Theory
    • Writing for Games
  • Programming
    • Artificial Intelligence
    • Engines and Middleware
    • General and Gameplay Programming
    • Graphics and GPU Programming
    • Math and Physics
    • Networking and Multiplayer
  • Visual Arts
    • 2D and 3D Art
    • Critique and Feedback
  • Community
    • GameDev Challenges
    • GDNet+ Member Forum
    • GDNet Lounge
    • GDNet Comments, Suggestions, and Ideas
    • Coding Horrors
    • Your Announcements
    • Hobby Project Classifieds
    • Indie Showcase
    • Article Writing
  • Affiliates
    • NeHe Productions
    • AngelCode
  • Topical
    • Virtual and Augmented Reality
    • News
  • Workshops
    • C# Workshop
    • CPP Workshop
    • Freehand Drawing Workshop
    • Hands-On Interactive Game Development
    • SICP Workshop
    • XNA 4.0 Workshop
  • Archive
    • Topical
    • Affiliates
    • Contests
    • Technical
  • GameDev Challenges's Topics
  • For Beginners's Forum

Calendars

  • Community Calendar
  • Games Industry Events
  • Game Jams
  • GameDev Challenges's Schedule

Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.

Product Groups

  • GDNet+
  • Advertisements
  • GameDev Gear

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


About Me


Website


Industry Role


Twitter


Github


Twitch


Steam

Found 262 results

  1. BewitchingGames

    Financial Stability

    I wanna thank everyone who helped me out with my last question, but now I got something possibly bigger than the last one. I just wanna know, how do you guys earn money while making your games to? Do you work a full time job and work on the game at the same time? Cause I gotta say, my full time job is awful, leaving me pretty much drained to the point I really can't do much of anything. So, I've been trying to figure out ways to earn money and work on a game at the same time. Cause I have a school debt to pay off, and now a car payment, so I can't not be working. I can't work at my current job any more for personal reasons. So I'm hoping I can get the help I'm looking for.
  2. I am basically brand new to the gaming industry business wise although I have been a gamer for years. I officially started my game publishing company, and being as though I am only 20, I have no connects to the gaming industry. Of course, I'm still going to do more internet research, but I thought why not ask folks who may have business hands in the gaming community? If anyone is questioning, my game prototype is basically done (I designed it myself) and its very detailed and I am going to start searching for a team to help me build it. Thank you.
  3. Hello I am looking for advice to what I should do next as I just completed the Unreal Developer Course on Udemy and now am at a lost as what to do farther as practice and to expand my knowledge. My background is 2 years studying college in Videogame Design and 3 years working on 4 years studying Software Engineering in college. I am mainly focusing on using my C++ knowledge with Unreal Engine to make indie games but I do also know Java, and C# as well, but I do not know Unity. I am welcoming any advice that can help with my current situation with my current skill set
  4. I've had a game idea for a while, and I wanted to finally try to create it. Its a 2D open-world tile-based MMO. The concept is it is one world and multiplayer only, so everyone shares one world no matter region, platform, etc. I am having problems finding out what to use to start development, I tried Unity but saw some of the negatives and refrained and now im stuck, could anyone recommend some intermediate friendly 2D engines that can support what I am looking for? Preferably in languages that are or are somewhat like Java, C#, Python, JavaScript, Lua. Thanks for your help, im very new at this if you cant tell
  5. Hey guys! I'm new here and I recently started developing my own rendering engine. It's open source, based on OpenGL/DirectX and C++. The full source code is hosted on github: https://github.com/fleissna/flyEngine I would appreciate if people with experience in game development / engine desgin could take a look at my source code. I'm looking for honest, constructive criticism on how to improve the engine. I'm currently writing my master's thesis in computer science and in the recent year I've gone through all the basics about graphics programming, learned DirectX and OpenGL, read some articles on Nvidia GPU Gems, read books and integrated some of this stuff step by step into the engine. I know about the basics, but I feel like there is some missing link that I didn't get yet to merge all those little pieces together. Features I have so far: - Dynamic shader generation based on material properties - Dynamic sorting of meshes to be renderd based on shader and material - Rendering large amounts of static meshes - Hierarchical culling (detail + view frustum) - Limited support for dynamic (i.e. moving) meshes - Normal, Parallax and Relief Mapping implementations - Wind animations based on vertex displacement - A very basic integration of the Bullet physics engine - Procedural Grass generation - Some post processing effects (Depth of Field, Light Volumes, Screen Space Reflections, God Rays) - Caching mechanisms for textures, shaders, materials and meshes Features I would like to have: - Global illumination methods - Scalable physics - Occlusion culling - A nice procedural terrain generator - Scripting - Level Editing - Sound system - Optimization techniques Books I have so far: - Real-Time Rendering Third Edition - 3D Game Programming with DirectX 11 - Vulkan Cookbook (not started yet) I hope you guys can take a look at my source code and if you're really motivated, feel free to contribute :-) There are some videos on youtube that demonstrate some of the features: Procedural grass on the GPU Procedural Terrain Engine Quadtree detail and view frustum culling The long term goal is to turn this into a commercial game engine. I'm aware that this is a very ambitious goal, but I'm sure it's possible if you work hard for it. Bye, Phil
  6. Crowdsourcer.io is a growing concept, it allows projects/small businesses to bring in collaborators on a revenue share basis to help them grow and expand. Felicity Toad is one of many projects that is successfully developing their game through this platform and we want to share some insights with you. Felicity Toad has started as a labour of love and grown into a team of co-operative people who are willing to work on the final vision of this original game. Its foundations lay with one Neil Badman, who being 43, has decided to go with a dream. He had spent many years in menial jobs, the most recent being in care, but working in the health sector gave him purpose and meaning, which would profoundly alter the way in which he saw his life. Unfortunately, after a time he fell into disarray, which ended with a breakdown, but without this event Neil would never have been diagnosed with schizophrenia, a much stigmatized illness, in part thanks to Hollywood and other uneducated outlets, he says. Unperturbed and with a new and hopefully temporary found freedom, he wondered what to do with his time out of work. He began a band, but couldn’t quite find the sound he wanted despite many auditions and help from friends, so he put this project aside for the time being and pondered what was next. A gamer turned developer Before his breakdown he had found himself playing various computer games in his spare time, something he had always loved, and stumbled across a game called Oolite, a cooperatively built game reverse engineered from an old classic called Elite, a 3D space game that ran on 32k and even less for the Vic-20, a remarkable technical achievement. Oolite was a modern take on this classic, and being cooperatively built allowed you to construct your own content that would go up on the game’s site, for other people to download. Being a lifelong drawer and creative he took to looking at what other people weren’t particularly working on, settling with the look of the stars and the nebula’s generated from various images within the file system. He spent a year perfecting the use of the nebula generator, which was extremely popular with the player base. After creating a few different assets for this game he moved on and discovered a game called Battle For Wesnoth, a tongue in cheek strategy game that was simple, but very fun. It too was a labour of love by a very involved community and was not only moddable but had its own programming language. It was around here he was diagnosed with schizophrenia and suddenly found himself with a lot of free time, a very frightening time but free nonetheless. Neil needed to find something to occupy himself with, a distraction therapy from the nightmarish voices that were plaguing him, this was when he started to explore and start the band. He found himself returning to Battle For Wesnoth, as it was a perfect platform to learn something new, whilst creating a story and the characters in it, the start of a therapeutic addiction that instantly rang true for him. This was nearly but not quite all his loves combined, he discovered the joy of creating through programming, despite his extremely messy first attempts. The code was however functional, and a story emerged. Neil wondered what it would be to have total creative freedom other than modding someone else’s build, so he researched and soon found Unity3D, a platform for developing games from scratch that is free up until you make a certain amount of money, if any. The start of something new Now he needed an idea, he went through the motions of beginning to create the basics of a game, but soon found the technology wasn’t quite there yet to do what he wanted, so it was back to the drawing board. This was the birth of Felicity Toad, a tongue in cheek adventure, but dark and gritty in places. This would be a labour of love, a therapy, and a possible path back into work. It seemed perfect. The Beginnings of Felicity Toad Soon the idea was growing, and Neil realized if he was going to build the game it would take years of learning all the different aspects, and as much as he had the drive to get on with it, technology is changing at a rate, and in the supposed time he took to build the game it would be out of date by the time he finished, surrounded by up and coming virtual reality and holographic technology, would a 2D platformer survive in this environment? He needed a team, he didn’t have money and finding people who would fall in love with his game and join up seemed extremely unlikely. After posting on numerous sites, sometimes in the wrong places, he garnered a small amount of interest, but it was through exploring the different sites he could try that he stumbled upon a suggestion posted by someone for someone else. A site called Crowdsourcer.io was up and coming, promising to set people such as himself on the right path with the right help. There was nothing to lose. Progress Made on Felicity Toad After Signing Up On Crowdsourcer.io Crowdsourcer.io has helped the project to get its creative foothold in a world already swimming in games, so what would be different about it? Well, firstly he decided he needed to be doing something doable as a first game, so he settled on a 2D platformer, but there are many 2D indie games out there and being developed, even AAA companies still produce 2D platformers of extremely and unobtainable quality to compete with. There was still hope, a large sector of society has a love of independently made games, simply because they can take risks big AAA companies can’t afford to, and the 2D style is very reminiscent yet appealing to all age ranges. So what could be different? What needs to be familiar? This was a balance that needed to be assessed, and the Felicity Toad team have gone a way to addressing this interesting situation. Neil is still working on the game and making strides to finishing it every day. You can learn more about Neil’s project, Felicity Toad by following the link or finding his project on www.crowdsourcer.io. If you would like to contribute to Neil’s project you can find it here and can apply to contribute! View the full article
  7. A few questions about some c++ code So I am starting to get back into c++ after about 12 - 14 years away from it (and even back then, my level of knowledge was maybe a little above beginner) to do some game / SDL programming. I was following a tutorial to get at least a basic starting point for an entity component system and it works however there was some code that I don't quite understand even after looking around little. First pice of code is: T* component(new T(std::forward<TArguments>(arguments)...)); This seems to be assigning the `component` with the results of what is in the parentheses though normally I would expect this: T* component = new T(std::forward<TArguments>(arguments)...); Is this just syntax preference or does the compiler do something different with the parentheses (it is weird to me as when I see that, I think it is a function call)? The second piece of code I think I understand the general idea of what it is doing but some of the specific are escaping me: template <typename T, typename... TArguments> T& Entity::addComponent(TArguments&&... arguments) { T* component = new T(std::forward<TArguments>(arguments)...); So from my understanding, the first line would basically take this: entity->addComponent<TransformComponent, int, int, int, int>(x, y, width, height); and take of the first item in the template and assign the to T and then "group" (not sure the correct term) the rest of the items as a collection of some sort and then the `...` on the second line would group the arguments (that would need to match the template group) that were passed in. Then the third line is effectively converting the template / passed in arguments to be called like this: TransformComponent* component = new TransformComponent(x, y, width, height); The parts that are a bit confusing to me is first the `&&`. From what I have read (from stack overflow), that symbol means rvalue reference or reference to an argument that is about to be destroyed. Not quite sure what it means by it about to be destroyed. The second part, which I think related to using `&&`, is the `std::forward<TArguments>`. The explainations that I have found so far as are bit confusing to me. I will continue to try to find the answer to these confusions but I though maybe someone here might have an explanation that might make more sense to me. I would also consider it quite possible that there is some prerequisite knowledge that I might not have (I mean I think I have a decent understanding of pointers and references) so if there is other stuff I should looking into, that would be great too.
  8. Hi, I've refactored my 3D Collision Engine so it creates Manifolds suggested by @Dirk Gregorius Previously I only considered Collision Response using a single point between 2 objects, but Manifolds have several points Does anyone have advice on how I can deal with Collision Responses using Manifolds? cheers
  9. Hi there! I think this post may get slightly depressing, so, reader discretion is advised. I'm writing this to summarize what I did during my first game development process and hopefully someone will find it helpful. So, in 2016 I tried to make a futuristic racing game in Unity. It was just for fun and learning purpouses but I knew I want to try to put it on sale on Steam. I asked some of my friends if they would want to join me in the adventure. And this is probably the first thing not to do because if you ask anybody if they want to help you with creating and selling a game, they will say "sure, absolutely!" and then when you start to assign duties they never text you back again. And that's demotivating. Couple of months went by, and the game was more or less complete so I decided to put it on the thing that doesn't exist anymore, which is Steam Greenlight. I was extremely excited to see other people comment about my game (seriously it was super cool). My greenlight page wasn't the most popular one, but it was doing pretty good. Eventually the game passed, and was ready to be put in the store. This was truly amazing because it wasn't easy to pass the Greenlight voting. The game was kind of shitty as I look at it right now, but it was the best I could do back in 2016. It looked kind of like a 4/10 mobile game. Nevertheless people were interested in it since it was unique and there wasn't (and isn't) any games simmilar to it. I posted about it on some gaming forums and some Facebook groups, just to see what people would think about it. And every comment was always positive which made me super excited and happy. Eventually, my game went on sale. At the beginning my game was selling ok to me, but when I read other people's stories, I understood that my number of sales was below miserable. Back then Steam had something called 5 "Product Update Visibility Rounds" which means that when you update your game, you can use the "Visibility Round" and your game will somehow be very visible in the store. Essencially you get 500,000 views for one day. This used to dramatically (to me) increase sales, so I used 4 of them in like a week, which is exactly what you're not supposed to do. I left one round for later, because I knew that my game is not the best and I may want to remake it in the future, so the last round may be helpful to get some sales. After about 1,5 month the game was dead and it wasn't selling anymore. I was kind of disappointed but I was waiting to get my revenue. This is when I got my first big disappointment. On the Steam developer page, my revenue was about $1000 and when I got the payment, it turned out that half the people who bought my game had it refunded. So my total revenue (1,5 month) was around $600. So my game was completely dead. I abandoned it and moved on. About half a year later there was a Steam Summer Sale which I forgot I applied for and the game made $100. This was the point when I decided to refresh my game. I spent 6 months remaking it and when I was happy with the result, I uploaded it on Steam. I made a sweet trailer and everything and used the final "Visibility Round", expecting to revive my game and start the real indie dev life. Huge f*ing disappointment #2: As it turned out, Steam changed the "Visibility Round" and now it doesn't do anything because I didn't get 500,000 views in one day... I got 1,276 views in 29 days. I started searching for a PR company. I messaged about 8 different companies and one contacted me back. I explained that my game is out already, but I recently updated it. The PR company was cool, very friendly and professional. Unfortunately a revenue share wasn't an option and they weren't cheap (for me). They understood that and not long after that, we made a deal. I won't get into the details, but everything went cool and my game was supposed to get some attention (press announcement). I even got a chance to put my game on the Windows Store, which again, was super exciting. Microsoft guys were extremely nice to work with so if any of you are planning to put your game on sale I strongly recommend considering Windows Store. For 4 months the PR company was instructing me on how to improve my game. It really was helpful, but come on, 4 months flew by. Although they were professional, suddenly we had a big misunderstanding. Somehow they didn't understand that my game is out already. Anyways, we were getting ready for the announcement and I had to make my website, which cost me some money. Also I had to buy a subscription for a multiplayer service for my game. (It uses Photon Network, I had to buy a subscription so more people could play online at the same time.)(Photon Network is great, strongly recommend it.) Disappointment #3: I bought a page promotion on Facebook. Estimated: 310,000 people interested, 40,000 clicks to my page. Reality: 0 people interested, 20 clicks to my page. The announcement happened. And nothing more. 80 Steam keys for my game went out for the press, 41 were used, 24 websites wrote about my game, 6 hateful comments, 2 positive, 17 more visits on my Steam page, 2 copies sold which doesn't matter because it's to little for Steam to send the payment. Estimated views of the press coverage: 694,000. Reality: probably less than 300. I don't give a f*ck at this point about my game which I have worked on for 10 months. I don't care about all the money I spent either. I don't blame anyone. I'm just not sure what not to do in the future. I guess the main lesson here is don't try to revive a game, just move on and computers suck at estimating things. Now I'm working on another game and I'm planning on making it free to play. I really enjoy making games, but it would be nice to have some feedback from the players. If any of you want to know something specific about my game or anything, feel free to ask. I expect nobody to see this post, so I'm probably going to paste it on some other forums. Cya. (sorry for the title being slightly clickbaiting)
  10. Would anyone be able to offer up some advice on my resume as well as have any pointers/tips when applying to a game designer job? I've been applying everyday for over a month for positions ranging from internships to full time game designer positions. Any advice would be helpful! Game Dev Resume.docx
  11. hi. I'm a programmer that I want to learn about game design fundamentals. as you may know there are lots of books that most of them teach the same thing. I want to know what are must to read and most important books that teach game design rules and fundamentals.
  12. If this is posted in the wrong forum or could use more tags, I apologise. This my first post. I am using ASSIMP to import FBX files for my system. Using Blender, I use Empties to create attachment points. Is there a way to get to these or detect these easily? The only way I can come up with is by going through the rootNode, and all of the child nodes, looking for names that match what I have entered. Which is quite cumbersome. Surely there has to be a better way of detecting an Empty ? Many thanks Andrea
  13. RidiculousName

    Advice Simple Windows C++ IDE

    I'm near the end of a college course for C++. During class we focused exclusively on C++ programming in a linux environment. I've tried MS Visual Studio, but it seems like learning how to use something that complex is going to be more trouble than I want to deal with right now. Can someone recommend me a good and easy to learn/use C++ windows IDE? I use windows 10.
  14. I've completed 3 games till now (Pong, Snake, Breakout), and in the end of each one of them I ask myself, how could I improve the way I architecture my code. After searching for 2 days, I've found out about the ECS and data oriented design (I'm not so sure, but seems like these two do walk holding hands). The thing is that they seem like a very efficient way to organize the code for optimization, as well for being able to modify a entity without too much trouble, but I'm not so sure if it's worth the trouble in a very small game in which you probably won't need optimization. The question is: worth it now to have such mindset in my game, or should I "create" my own way to architecture the code as I learn?
  15. I am about to start a PhD that will investigate ways of replicating creativity in the AI systems of simulated people in virtual environments. I will research which psychology theories and models to use in order to achieve this, with a focus on creative problem solving. The aim of this project is to create virtual characters and NPCs that can create new solutions to challenges, even if they have never encountered these before. This would mean that not every possible action or outcome would need to be coded for, so less development resources are required. Players would encounter virtual people that are not bound by rigid patterns of pre-scripted behaviour, increasing the replay value and lifespan of games, and the accuracy of simulations. I am looking for companies or organisations that would be interested in working with me on my PhD, and I think computer games companies might be the most likely. I am trying to think of ways in which this new AI system might benefit games companies, or improvements and new types of games that might be possible. I am on this forum to ask for your thoughts and suggestions please, so I can approach games companies with some examples. Thank you for your time and interest.
  16. Many developers count breaking even as a success, but without enough income to continue development that success may not be sustainable. Daniel Cook discusses sustainable long term development, and the strategies Spry Fox employ to ensure they can continue making games.
  17. Chris DeLeon takes a frank look at professional game development - while game dev can be a great hobby, professional game development may not be for everyone!
  18. Industry veteran Tom Sloper shares his advice on how to get from idea to actual game.
  19. jbadams

    Finishing Games

    Spelunky creator Derek Yu writes about how to actually get your games finished and released.
  20. I got into a conversation awhile ago with some fellow game artists and the prospect of signing bonuses got brought up. Out of the group, I was the only one who had negotiated any sort of sign on bonus or payment above and beyond base compensation. My goal with this article and possibly others is to inform and motivate other artists to work on this aspect of their “portfolio” and start treating their career as a business. What is a Sign-On Bonus? Quite simply, a sign-on bonus is a sum of money offered to a prospective candidate in order to get them to join. It is quite common in other industries but rarely seen in the games unless it is at the executive level. Unfortunately, conversations centered around artist employment usually stops at base compensation, quite literally leaving money on the table. Why Ask for a Sign-On Bonus? There are many reasons to ask for a sign-on bonus. In my experience, it has been to compensate for some delta between how much I need vs. how much the company is offering. For example, a company has offered a candidate a position paying $50k/year. However, research indicates that the candidate requires $60k/year in order to keep in line with their personal financial requirements and long-term goals. Instead of turning down the offer wholesale, they may ask for a $10k sign on bonus with actionable terms to partially bridge the gap. Whatever the reason may be, the ask needs to be reasonable. Would you like a $100k sign-on bonus? Of course! Should you ask for it? Probably not. A sign-on bonus is a tool to reduce risk, not a tool to help you buy a shiny new sports car. Aspects to Consider Before one goes and asks for a huge sum of money, there are some aspects of sign-on bonus negotiations the candidate needs to keep in mind. - The more experience you have, the more leverage you have to negotiate - You must have confidence in your role as an employee. - You must have done your research. This includes knowing your personal financial goals and how the prospective offer changes, influences or diminishes those goals. To the first point, the more experience one has, the better. If the candidate is a junior employee (roughly defined as less than 3 years of industry experience) or looking for their first job in the industry, it is highly unlikely that a company will entertain a conversation about sign-on bonuses. Getting into the industry is highly competitive and there is likely very little motivation for a company to pay a sign-on bonus for one candidate when there a dozens (or hundreds in some cases) of other candidates that will jump at the first offer. Additionally, the candidate must have confidence in succeeding at the desired role in the company. They have to know that they can handle the day to day responsibilities as well as any extra demands that may come up during production. The company needs to be convinced of their ability to be a team player and, as a result, is willing to put a little extra money down to hire them. In other words, the candidate needs to reduce the company’s risk in hiring them enough that an extra payment or two is negligible. And finally, they must know where they sit financially and where they want to be in the short-, mid-, and long-term. Having this information at hand is essential to the negotiation process. The Role Risk Plays in Employment The interviewing process is a tricky one for all parties involved and it revolves around the idea of risk. Is this candidate low-risk or high-risk? The risk level depends on a number of factors: portfolio quality, experience, soft skills, etc. Were you late for the interview? Your risk to the company just went up. Did you bring additional portfolio materials that were not online? Your risk just went down and you became more hireable. If a candidate has an offer in hand, then the company sees enough potential to get a return on their investment with as little risk as possible. At this point, the company is confident in their ability as an employee (ie. low risk) and they are willing to give them money in return for that ability. Asking for the Sign-On Bonus So what now? The candidate has gone through the interview process, the company has offered them a position and base compensation. Unfortunately, the offer falls below expectations. Here is where the knowledge and research of the position and personal financial goals comes in. The candidate has to know what their thresholds and limits are. If they ask for $60k/year and the company is offering $50k, how do you ask for the bonus? Once again, it comes down to risk. Here is the point to remember: risk is not one-sided. The candidate takes on risk by changing companies as well. The candidate has to leverage the sign-on bonus as a way to reduce risk for both parties. Here is the important part: A sign-on bonus reduces the company’s risk because they are not commiting to an increased salary and bonus payouts can be staggered and have terms attached to them. The sign-on bonus reduces the candidate’s risk because it bridges the gap between the offered compensation and their personal financial requirements. If the sign-on bonus is reasonable and the company has the finances (explained further down below), it is a win-win for both parties and hopefully the beginning a profitable business relationship. A Bit about Finances First off, I am not a business accountant nor have I managed finances for a business. I am sure that it is much more complicated than my example below and there are a lot of considerations to take into account. In my experience, however, I do know that base compensation (ie. salary) will generally fall into a different line item category on the financial books than a bonus payout. When companies determine how many open spots they have, it is usually done by department with inter-departmental salary caps. For a simplified example, an environment department’s total salary cap is $500k/year. They have 9 artists being paid $50k/year, leaving $50k/year remaining for the 10th member of the team. Remember the example I gave earlier asking for $60k/year? The company cannot offer that salary because it breaks the departmental cap. However, since bonuses typically do not affect departmental caps, the company can pull from a different pool of money without increasing their risk by committing to a higher salary. Sweetening the Deal Coming right out of the gate and asking for an upfront payment might be too aggressive of a play (ie. high risk for the company). One way around this is to attach terms to the bonus. What does this mean? Take the situation above. A candidate has an offer for $50k/year but would like a bit more. If through the course of discussing compensation they get the sense that $10k is too high, they can offer to break up the payments based on terms. For example, a counterpoint to the initial base compensation offer could look like this: $50k/year salary $5k bonus payout #1 after 30 days of successful employment $5k bonus payout #2 after 365 days (or any length of time) of successful employment In this example, the candidate is guaranteed $55k/year salary for 2 years. If they factor in a standard 3% cost of living raise, the first 3 years of employment looks like this: Year 0-1 = $55,000 ($50,000 + $5,000 payout #1) Year 1-2 = $56,500 (($50,000 x 1.03%) + $5,000 payout #2) Year 2-3 = $53,045 ($51,500 x 1.03%) Now it might not be the $60k/year they had in mind but it is a great compromise to keep both parties comfortable. If the Company Says Yes Great news! The company said yes! What now? Personally, I always request at least a full 24 hours to crunch the final numbers. In the past, I’ve requested up to a week for full consideration. Even if you know you will say yes, doing due diligence with your finances one last time is always a good practice. Plug the numbers into a spreadsheet, look at your bills and expenses again, and review the whole offer (base compensation, bonus, time off/sick leave, medical/dental/vision, etc.). Discuss the offer with your significant other as well. You will see the offer in a different light when you wake up, so make sure you are not rushing into a situation you will regret. If the Company Say No If the company says no, then you have a difficult decision to make. Request time to review the offer and crunch the numbers. If it is a lateral move (same position, different company) then you have to ask if the switch is worth it. Only due diligence will offer that insight and you have to give yourself enough time to let those insights arrive. You might find yourself accepting the new position due to other non-financial reasons (which could be a whole separate article!). Conclusion/Final Thoughts When it comes to negotiating during the interview process, it is very easy to take what you can get and run. You might fear that in asking for more, you will be disqualifying yourself from the position. Keep in mind that the offer has already been extended to you and a company will not rescind their offer simply because you came back with a counterpoint. Negotiations are expected at this stage and by putting forth a creative compromise, your first impression is that of someone who conducts themselves in a professional manner. Also keep in mind that negotiations do not always go well. There are countless factors that influence whether or not someone gets a sign-on bonus. Sometimes it all comes down to being there at the right time at the right place. Just make sure you do your due diligence and be ready when the opportunity presents itself. Hope this helps!
  21. I finished my game and I'm trying to make a introduction video, I got some feedback from: So I created a new one here: If you have any suggestions please let me know, thank you. Also I'm thinking about creating another more in depth video that is about 6 minutes, it will explain the space connector mechanics more clearly, which I won't use as the introduction video but will direct people who are interested in the game to it. However, I'm wondering if I should do that or just let the players discover it for themselves in game.
  22. Hi, I’m currently looking to link a game(s) with another game. Essentially, I want to make it so that when playing Game A, the player can perform a certain action that causes Game B to launch, and Game A to close or minimize. Then, when the player quits Game B, Game A would open back up, preferably with the player where they were when they launched Game B. How would I go about doing this?
  23. Hi, In my Physics Engine I use Polyhedra for my objects & I get the Intersection Polyhedra & take the Centre of Mass as the Collision Points. Sometimes creating the Intersection Polyhedra fails due to floating-point rounding errors Are there more reliable ways of creating Collision Points? cheers
  24. I have a MongoDB db on a server operated by Kryonet. Obviously I need to be able to query the database from the client for adding, removing, requesting all kind of assets. Now I have written the code to request, add and remove fighters on the Kryonet network I am wondering if there is a better way to do this. I feel it's a bit repetitive, especially when I need to implement this for all other assets the player can own and other players assets when needed. The way I am currently approaching this is the same as my chat/lobby system which works great but I was wondering if anyone could see improvement on my code or a complete different way that is much more scalable perhaps. public class ClientAssets { public static final int FIGHTER_REQUEST = 1; public static final int FIGHTER_RESPONSE = 2; public static final int FIGHTER_ADD = 3; public static final int FIGHTER_REMOVE = 4; public static void Register(EndPoint endPoint) { Kryo kryo = endPoint.getKryo(); kryo.register(FighterRequest.class); kryo.register(FighterResponse.class); kryo.register(FighterAdd.class); kryo.register(FighterRemove.class); } static public abstract class AssetPacket { public int packetId; public AssetPacket() { } } /** * Packet to request all owned fighters */ public static class FighterRequest extends AssetPacket { public ObjectId playerId; public FighterRequest(ObjectId playerId) { packetId = FIGHTER_REQUEST; this.playerId = playerId; } public FighterRequest() { } } /** * Receiving fighter data from server */ public static class FighterResponse extends AssetPacket { public Fighter fighter; public boolean add; // Add or remove public FighterResponse(Fighter fighter, boolean add) { packetId = FIGHTER_RESPONSE; this.fighter = fighter; this.add = add; } public FighterResponse() { } } /** * Adds a fighter to player assets */ public static class FighterAdd extends AssetPacket { public ObjectId fighterTemplateID; public FighterAdd(ObjectId fighterTemplateID) { packetId = FIGHTER_ADD; this.fighterTemplateID = fighterTemplateID; } public FighterAdd() { } } /** * Removes fighter from assets. */ public static class FighterRemove extends AssetPacket { public ObjectId fighterId; public FighterRemove(ObjectId fighterId) { packetId = FIGHTER_REMOVE; this.fighterId = fighterId; } public FighterRemove() { } } } To elaborate a bit more, this code will communicate between client and server. When receiving a request on the server it will lookup the request in the database. The client will store it for displaying the assets. A specific thing I am unsure about is the FighterResponse.add boolean. I need to be able to remove and add fighters, I guess I am better off with a FighterAddResponse and a FighterRemove response so I will send one boolean less each time this packet is send. But this will create even more repetitive code.
  25. Hi, I am currently a college student studying to become a Game Developer. I need to interview current game developers for a class I'm taking. if anyone seeing this could answer just the 5 questions that I have provided below as well as your name, current position, and how many years you've been in the game industry. I'd really appreciate any responses. Name: Position: Year in the industry: What was the starting salary? How many hours do you work? What did you learn outside of school that was useful? How did you get your job and how hard was it to find it? how was this job different than you expected it to be? Thank you for your time. -Alex Daughters
  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

Participate in the game development conversation and more when you create an account on GameDev.net!

Sign me up!