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Found 61 results

  1. Hello everyone! I've decided to implement a destructible enemies system. Description: When bullet hit enemy in specific part of his body(arm fo example) armour, which covers that part of body, will fall off. Enemies in my game are robots so this means that when shooting them certain plates of their armour will fall off. All enemies will have a different amount of armour plates My solution: The only solution I came up with is to make an actor with a static mesh and attach it to the bones of enemy's skeletal mesh. When bullet hit that actor it detaches and fly away with add impulse node. Question: Maybe there is a better solution, which I'm missing and it's more efficient.
  2. This article was originally posted on LocalizeDirect's blog Ever thought about expanding your game to the MENA region but not sure where to start? Try Turkey first. It’s very much a mix of East and West, it is also the most developed games market and the video game centre of MENA. Previously Turkey attracted mostly Asian publishers, now, Western companies include it in their expansion plans too. KEY TAKEAWAYS: Turkey is the most developed games market in MENA and #18 in the world. Console and PC games generate slightly more revenue than mobile games. Localization to Turkey requires human input and QA due to numerous suffixes as strings with placeholders should be completely paraphrased (and, surprise, machines are still bad at doing that). What’s covered? Turks are fond of games. Why? We have a few interesting numbers Who is targeting Turkey? The most popular game genres Why are successful games in Turkey all localized? 9 best game localization approaches for the Turkish market How to make a foreign game #1 in Turkey Turkey is a 30 million strong gamers market, full of young gamers (this is more than the total population of many European countries!) Last year, Turkish gamers generated over $850 million in game revenue. This translated into the ranking they occupied in the top 20 most lucrative games markers globally. In 2019, Turkish online games revenues are predicted to grow at 8%, and mobile games are expected to bring 9% more revenue than in 2018. Image source Fun fact: Turkish gamers spend 70% of their time on PC, ranking 3rd after only Poland and Russia. In 2018, PC/Console games generated more revenue than mobile games. Why so? #1 Internet cafes. There are more than 20,000 cyber cafes in Turkey which are visited by 7.5 million gamers every month. This means that even those players who do not have cutting-edge technology at home, can still play complex video games elsewhere. #2 Over the last year, computer games became more affordable due to the numerous promotions on digital gaming platforms like Steam. No wonder Turkey has been called “the video game centre of the MENA region”. Some game brands that target Turkey Thanks to mobile gaming, the gamer user base grew considerably in just a few years. There are 50 million smartphone users in the country, and after the arrival of the popular “Angry Birds,” “Candy Crush” and “Fruit Ninja” games, more and more people started playing mobile games. In 2018, the popularity of video games, PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds and Fortnite, boosted the interest in both mobile and online games. Nintendo re-entered Turkey with the Nintendo Switch in 2018 after an absence of many years. Epic Games, Riot Games, Zynga, Netmarble and a number of other game brands have Turkey in their portfolios. What are the most popular game genres in Turkey? According to Gaming in Turkey , Turkish gamers prefer MOBA, strategy, RPG, casual, and esports game genres. Many were attracted by the “Grand Theft Auto” series and easily turned into fans afterwards. If you developed a mobile board game, definitely localize it into Turkish - almost half of all mobile sessions are related to this game genre. Image source Turkish gamers prefer free-to-play games, based on the “micro-transaction” model, when gamers play for free but pay to upgrade their accounts. Competition is an important part of gaming habits too: Turkish gamers love features like “player versus player”. Also, the content and game rules should be accessible and easy to learn. Successful games in Turkey are all localized 80% of the Turkish population don’t speak any other language but Turkish. This means - game localization is a must if you want to win over your target gaming audience. Localizing your game into the Turkish market is easier than into any of the Arabic-speaking countries. Unlike right-to-left Arabic, Turkey in written from left to right which makes it easier from the perspective of UI/UX design. However, there are some Turkish-specific characters. For instance, there are 4 i’s in the Turkish language: dotted and dotless. While the uppercase for ‘i’ in English is I, in Turkish it’s dotted İ. Some Latin characters aren’t used at all. Best game localization practices for the Turkish market Follow the recommendations of our Turkish translators on what to pay attention to in your translation process to ensure top-notch localization, whether it’s a mobile, PC or console game. #1 - Mind language length Cagdas Mandali: “In Turkish, there are many verbs that are made of one noun and one auxiliary verb. Such as, “Accept” is a noun in Turkish when translated alone (Kabul). You make it a verb by adding an auxiliary verb, and it has to become “Kabul Et”. This applies to many other buttons, such as deposit, withdraw, help, continue… The list is long.” #2 - Take suffixes seriously in the placeholders Turkish is the language of suffixes. And if in the regular translations the linguists can customize it accordingly, when it comes to the text with placeholders, it’s a real challenge for translators. Cagdas Mandali: “Say, our text is “Send Energy to {player_name}“. It is clear that the placeholder will be replaced by another player’s name. But, in Turkish, any name will have a different suffix. Depending on the letter used in the last syllable, the suffixes are conjugated as a back vowel or a front vowel. Then, we have an issue of blending letters. “To Rodrigo” is translated as “Rodrigo’ya”, and “To Elly” is translated as “Elly’ye”. “Michael’s” is translated as “Michael’ın” while “Slava’s” is translated as “Slava’nın” (extra “n” is added when the name ends with a vowel). Since there is no legit way of finding a one size fits all translation, we localize it as “Send Energy to the player whose name is {player_name}” or “X that belongs to the player named {player_name}“. Unfortunately, the only solution is to define different placeholder suffixes and also placeholders for last syllables of all nouns, which is almost impossible as long as clients send us only unified placeholder texts.” #3 - Link your game to the local culture References to the local celebrities and jokes will be appreciated although don’t overdo culturalization. If gamers are playing a game featuring Italian mafia, no need to turn it into Turkish gangsters. Collaboration with local celebrities can be also useful. When localizing its F2P title “League of Legends”, Riot Games hired Turkish celebrities as voice actors. It paid off: the game became super popular and attracted thousands Turkish gamers to the Internet cafes to play LoL. #4 - Adjust formatting to the Turkish locale If your original game was developed in the US or for the US audience, change dates, time, decimal separators, currency. Remember The Witcher 3 by CD Projekt that took the hit by localizing the price? Some basic rules: a) Date format: DD.MM.YYYY Example: 17.12.2020 for 12.17.2020 in the US b) Time format: HH:MM[:SS] Ex: 20:00 for 08:00 pm, and 08:00 for 08:00 am c) Numeric format: 999.999,99 with comma as decimal separator and period as a grouping character. Currency symbol positioned after number. Example: 123.455,25₺ vs $123,455.25 Ali Yucel: “We put the percentage sign before the number rather than after it. We don’t use single quotation marks unless it’s a quote within a quote. And our rules for using commas are quite different from that of English.” #5 - Allow mistakes and international words if needed In some cases, the street version of the language would be preferred over the academic one. Plus, many international words became an indispensable part of Turkish daily vocabulary. So to say, there is no need to translate sushi as the “Japanese raw fish dish” - sushi is sushi, full stop. Cagdas Mandali: “One game that I localized features kids - uneducated, rude, swearing all the time. I translated their dialogues in the same manner as Turkish street kids would talk, without attention to grammar, misspelling some words. However, the developers decided to go with the “proofed and corrected” version of the text where those kids were talking like ladies and barons. Luckily, after the texts went online, the developers consulted a 3rd party, and decided to change the already live texts for the “street version.” #6 - Evaluate your in-game content for the sensitive element Religion (Islam) can become a sensitive issue, but there’s always a work-around. Casino games are banned in Turkey although no other games with microtransactions or in-game purchases are at risk. As in many other countries, ultra violent games or those that “undermine” Islam find themselves on shaky ground, especially if they target a young audience. #7 - Translate tutorials and guidelines Turks have trouble finding tutorials or walkthroughs in Turkish. If they don’t understand sophisticated games such as World of Warcraft, they quit. League of Legends gained a lot of popularity after it was localized into Turkish and it still has a HUGE community in Turkey (over 13 million active accounts). Ali Yucel: “To give an example, even at the height of WoW, all non-English speaking Turkish gamers preferred Knight Online over it, because it was very simple, and it didn’t require much knowledge of English. It was simply a hack and slash MMO. Yet, there were thousands of Turkish websites, forums and blogs dedicated to Knight Online.” #8 - QA game after localization Allow Turkish translators and native-speaking testers to PLAY the game to spot any inconsistencies and errors. Usually, professional game translation services have proofreading as part of their localization process, without LQA, they track grammar mistakes rather than language-related issues. Ali Yucel: “Many publishers/developers will pay for the QA of the translations, but not for actually playing the game and making note of the issues there. Professional publishers pay for at least 5 hours of play time, with developer access, and that solves a lot of problems. Sometimes, even the same sentences/expressions will need to be translated differently depending on the context. You cannot always catch that by simply looking at the Excel or MemoQ screen. At least that’s the case in Turkish.” Game localization costs into Turkish start from $0.15/word while Turkish game testing - at €30/hour. #9 - Translate ads and marketing materials Ali Yucel: “I keep seeing Instagram and Facebook ads that were translated very badly. That’s a huge turn off. Even a single line can make a bad impression. It has to sound right, and that’s impossible with literal translation.” How to market your game in Turkey? Now, after you’ve localized your in- and out-game text, how are you going to promote it? As games are entertainment products, they should be marketed like movies or concerts. You’ll need a media plan and, probably, cooperation with a local marketing agency. Influencer marketing, Google and Facebook ads are key if you want to get installs and reach a younger audience. Traditional media can be of use too. For instance, to promote its game Paramanya/Travelling Millionaire - a fully localized version of Modoo Marble, South Korean mobile game company Netmarble shared a fake news story about a mysterious man spreading money all around Istanbul, and involved fake anchors to report on it. Screenshot of one of the fake reports. Source: Youtube The campaign went viral and even made its way to a popular TV show when the truth was revealed. As a result, Paramanya became the top grossing game in Turkey (and later in Saudi Arabia). Make Turkish gamers discover your game now and book your spot at the top of the MENA region. Contact us to discuss Turkish localization services, your title potential or play with the game translation tool to get the quote estimates for MENA localization.
  3. In the 5th PixelCast, Jeremy shares some fond memories of Castlevania IV now that it's October and Halloween gaming is on. Jeremy also dives into the news and covers an issue that's been on his heart and mind lately; the increasing number of game developers who seem to be passing away in their 40's and 50's.
  4. In the 5th PixelCast, Jeremy shares some fond memories of Castlevania IV now that it's October and Halloween gaming is on. Jeremy also dives into the news and covers an issue that's been on his heart and mind lately; the increasing number of game developers who seem to be passing away in their 40's and 50's. View full story
  5. JeremyAlessi

    PixelCast 2

    In episode #2, Jeremy adds some formatting by covering the news, reflecting on the inspiration for PixelFest, and delving into an important developer lesson; that period of time everyone faces when they have to decide whether to play a game or make a game with their time. https://youtu.be/fvaG_pIIUYM
  6. TheFever716

    Solid Dell PC Currently on Sale

    Via PC Gamer, the G5 Gaming Desktop is on sale for $813.99. It comes packed with a Nvidia GeForce GTX 1660, 6-core/12-thread Intel Core i5-9400 processor, a 360W PSU, 8GB of DDR4 RAM, a 1TB 7200 RPM hard drive, a Qualcomm SW1810 Wi-Fi and Bluetooth 4.2 wireless card. You can check out the PC for yourself here.
  7. Mikael Henriksson

    Twelfth entry - 8 August 2019

    Hello! This is the twelfth entry of my development blog for my project 'Tracked Mind'. I wasn't completely happy with the current inventory system, so the game now has a new system. You can see what it looks like in one of the screenshots that I'm uploading. The problem I had with the old one is now gone, and the new system can support more information about the objects. I decided that there won't be an ammo counter on the HUD, but it is possible to check how much ammo is in the current firearm, and of course you can see how much ammo you have in the inventory. I think that the "check ammo" feature will add a bit more immersion but it will also hopefully teach the player to be ready for the next enemy encounter. What do you think about that feature? Besides that I have been focusing on building and designing the apartment complex that I mentioned in the last post. I'm uploading some screenshots of that level. Why will the main character be at that apartment complex? To not spoil too much of the story I can only mention that the main character has to search for a specific item in one of the apartments. The problem is that a street gang took over when the land lord abandoned it, the economical crisis plaguing the town really hurt the manpower of the local police force. The Police had no chance to stop the street gangs from taking over many parts of the town. But are the gang members the only thing that can give the the main character problems in the apartment complex? I'm planning on recording a video that shows a bit more of the combat of the game. Stay tuned for it! It is now possible to contribute to the game at: https://www.patreon.com/clovetastic Any support helps me a lot! What's new since last post? Here are a few things: General changes - A comletely new inventory system. - Currently building map: The apartment complex. - Adjusted the fire rate for the Pistol, it's now quicker. - A new Patreon page. Bug Fixes - Ammo stacking works again thanks to the new inventory system. Don't forget to follow the game on twitter on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ClovetasticI Thank you! /Mikael Henriksson - Clovetastic Interactive
  8. Alice Thunderbird

    vampire empire

    vampire empire click to patreon Vampire Empire 5best Cosmic Global TBS ccg StartegyUnity / android / 5 playersInfocosmic TBS CCG “Vampire Empire : Deep Range 5”Vampire Empire Deep Range 5mobile platform : Android / PCgenre : cosmic turn-based strategy : multiplayer cosmic TBSconsistency : Star Maps Heroes on the Cruisers to 5 for the Coalition of 5 Coalitions in the GamePhantoms-Pirates as Neutralsunique special points ( USP ) : Espionage / Diplomacy / Trade5 types of bases : Trade/Military/Academy/Scientific/Center of the Coalition5 types of fighters : V Y X S C : VYX Star Control5 races : Gaallax / Feynix / Xumanax / Wellenix / ZaxxxССG: Collectible Cards Gamefor adult community / game art
  9. I reviewed 42 of the most popular 2D game engines so that beginners can have an overview of what's in the market without having to look all over the web. I included useful info for each engine such as their price, activity, game showcases, documentation and popularity.
  10. ProjectTaival

    Dev Diary #030 - SitRep 01

    Hello, and welcome to this weeks Dev Diary! Today I'll keep this sweet and short by explaining the current situation of the project, in order to do some public book keeping in following order; Horror -title RTS -title Video production Hardware issues State of the Horror -Title The horror title has been in hiatus since the announcement of the RTS game, but not abandoned. It still serves a part in the larger mythos of the stories that I intend to make Majority of the game is still at a concept stage (story, mechanics, events etc.). The model of the apartment building is nearly ready and could be used in a demo version as-is. Most of the models for furniture assets are still in development. Nearly all the generic furniture have been modeled. The main character has been initially modeled, but is missing details still. Textures haven't been touched yet. Development halted and will be continued after the RTS title has been launched, at the latest. State of the RTS -Title All of the game is still at a concept state - no assets have been created yet. Mechanics, features and story elements are being gathered, written down and pondered upon. Under active development. State of the Video Production Part 1 of the real time making of the assets has been edited and ready to be rendered. The status bar for the videos is ready to be rendered. The status texts are a work in progress due to technical difficulties with the hardware. (more on that below) Development halted until hardware has been stabilized and thus rendering the videos is made possible. State of the Hardware Issues Studied BIOS settings and their implications. Daily testing of the stability of several RAM timing, frequency and voltage settings, without borging the performance. Investigating the maximum stable CPU/FSB speed. Conclusion The project has had much more trouble than what I anticipated it could have. Much more so than what I have talked about in public, as some of the slowdowns keep on repeating and no settings seem to fix the crashes with my computer, which is becoming really frustrating, to say the least. While these issues are ongoing, I will start the development of the RTS title, as the videos could take some time to be available at this rate and it would be a waste of time to just wait until I have been able to find the appropriate settings, as testing one settings takes at least a whole day. I just might have to sacrifice more performance than I have been unwilling to do thus far. Completing the videos are now secondary and starting the development of the RTS -title is a major priority. Thank you for tuning in and I'll see you on the next one! You can check out every possible mid week announcements about the project on these official channels; • YouTube • Facebook • Twitter • Discord • Reddit • Pinterest • SoundCloud • LinkedIn •
  11. Introduction As part of releasing your game to the public, something which is often overlooked is code signing. Code signing is a cryptographic process whereby your game's executables and/or installer are marked as authentic, so that the person running the executable (or anyone else for that matter) can ensure that: The executable has not been changed since it was signed The executable was created on a specific date at a specific time The executable was signed by a known, trackable entity (company or individual) responsible for the code within These give some definite advantages (as well as introducing some disadvantages) as shown below: Advantages of code signing Signing your executables provides tracability of your code, allowing anyone to see who is responsible for the program Signing adds authenticity which makes your game and your company (if there is one) more reputable and trustworthy It will give positive weight to systems such as smartscreen filter and many anti-malware programs, which are more permissive of signed executables than unsigned. Disadvantages of code signing There is an up-front cost involved in aquiring a certificate for code signing If you do not have the required forms of identification or business documentation, obtaining a certificate can be hard to impossible There is a learning curve to understanding how certificates work (which this article hopes to address) The steps involved in signing your code To properly sign your code, you must follow several steps, which must be completed in a strict order. These steps are: Select a certificate authority Before you can sign your program code, you first need to select a certificate authority. The cost of object code signing has come down massively in price over the past few years. You will need to search for a certificate authority that will provide you with a type of certificate known as an "object code certificate" or "authenticode certificate". Here are some possible choices, this list is by no means exhaustive and I encourage you to search for additional sources of certificates before parting with any money: Comodo - This costs $119.95 per year, however if you are a member of Tucows this can be reduced to $75 per year simply by purchasing through Tucows as a member. Verisign/Symantec - Traditionally the most expensive choice but popular with big business. Starts at $795 per year. Remember to shop around as many different resellers of certificates offer their product at a much lower price through third parties, for example as a business user you can get brand name certificates at a much lower price via RapidSSL. Also remember that a lot of the time, you are paying for brand names. All certificates I have listed here are equally trusted by the Windows operating system, so there isn't much point in paying $795 per year for a certificate when one you pay $59.90 a year for will function identically. Important Note: Although LetsEncrypt are fantastic (and highly recommended by this author) for web server SSL certificates for HTTPS, they do not at present (last checked July 2019) support code signing/authenticode. Should they start doing so, they would instantly move to the top of this list. Purchasing a certificate When you have selected a company to purchase your certificate through, you will then need to purchase your certificate through their shopping cart (unfortunately, I cannot really advise how to do this as it varies from website to website, but the concept is similar - provide payment details and wait to hear from them). As part of the purchase you will either have to upload signed forms of your photo identification or business documentation to the certificate authority's website (so be prepared to do this, there is no way around it). Generally, it is expected for a non-business user to be able to send scanned copies of a photo driving license and/or passport, and a recent utility bill. Also, expect to hear from the certificate authority directly via your phone number, which will be a mandatory field on the application form. This will be a call to verify your identity, and not a sales call. Generally, the level of checking for a code signing certificate is somewhat similar to that needed to open a bank account. he reason for both of these is to prove you are who you say you are so that the certificate you are purchasing has some weight. This prevents you for example from signing up and buying a certificate claiming to be "Microsoft" or "Google" as to do so you would need that company's business documentation. Once you have completed the process, you will be sent a link to download a certificate file. Downloading the certificate file Once the certificate authority has provided you with a link to download your certificate, you will then have in your possession one or more small encrypted files. You will either have (depending on the authority you selected) a seperate .crt and .key file, or a .pfx (or p7k) file, which is the .crt and .key files combined into one. You should make sure that these files are backed up securely, as if you lose them you may have to pay for re-issue of your certificate which can be costly. My advice is to move them immediately to a DVD-ROM and lock them away wherever you keep your paper driving license and home insurance, or whatever else holds value to you. SSL and signing fundamentals Before we continue further with the article it is worth pointing out the difference between the certificate and key (.crt and .key file) which you have obtained from your certificate authority. Both are important and have different uses. When you first sign up for your certificate authority of choice a "private key" is generated. This is used to uniquely identify you, and if lost can never be replaced. Depending on the authority you choose, some may trigger creation of this file by your browser, and have it stored in your registry or browser settings (in which case it is never sent to the certificate authority, which is more secure) and others may generate it for you, and send it to you with your certificate. Either way, in the end it is used as part of the certificate which is sent to you. The certificate is a blob of data created by your certificate authority, and then signed by both your key (see above) and the key of your certificate authority, wihch you will never have in your possession. In simple terms, to sign your certificate means to apply a hash to it using the private key of the signer in such a way that you may verify it without that key but may not re-create it yourself, allowing you to verify its authenticity but not forge its content. There is much more to the process, delving deep into complex maths and cryptography, but that is beyond the scope of this article which intends to simplify code signing rather than make it complex. Saving the certificate file If your certificate authority has provided you with a .cer and .key file, I advise that before you continue, you convert it to a .pfx file as it is easier to work with on Windows. There are several ways to convert your files, and your certificate authority might provide you with an online tool or a simple download of your certificate in .pfx form. If they do, I suggest you use this feature as it will be more straightforward. If they do not provide such a facility, you can use the openssl toolkit to convert your .cer and .key file into .pfx using the command line below, for which you will need to install the openssl toolkit onto your PC, which is a free open source download: openssl pkcs12 -export -out yourcert.pfx -inkey yourkey.key -in yourcert.cer The program will prompt you for a password, as part of the process I strongly recommend you enter a strong one as this will protect your certificate from misuse if it is obtained by any third party! Once you have the .pfx file, simply double click it and windows will prompt you to add it to your registry: You should mark the certificate as "not exportable" which will stop someone from simply extracting the certificate from your registry at a later date. Following through the wizard will prompt you for the password you set on the file, simply enter it, and continue clicking through the wizard accepting the defaults. Once complete, you will receive a message saying the certificate was successfully imported into your registry, which means you are now ready to sign executables! Please remember that the certificate you have purchased is valid for signing files until its expiry date so you only have to buy the certificate once every one or two years (or however long the certificate is valid for) and with this one purchase you can sign as many executables as you like, whenever you like. After this, the sky is literally the limit! Signing your executables, and timestamping We now finally have the correct configuration and the correct files to be able to sign our executables. It is important to note however that there is one important difference between signing an executable, and putting an SSL certificate onto a website or most other uses of security certificates. Binary code may be timestamped. What this means, in simple terms, is that the signed executable can still be considered valid even if your certificate has expired, you just wouldn't be able to sign any new files with an expired certificate. To prove my point find any signed executable on your disk which is over three years old. The chances are, by now the certificate which was used to sign this file has expired (you can see this by right clicking on the file and choosing properties, then the 'security' tab) however if the file is timestamped, when you double click the file it will still be considered valid. Timestamping is a process done automatically when you sign your file. It involves contacting a third party server which counter-signs your file with a special value which references back to the certificate issuer's servers. This value can then be used to verify that the certificate was valid at the time of signing the file rather than right now. Because of this, you should always use your certificate authorities own timestamp server which you can easily find on Google. Armed with this information, signing your code is quite straightforward: "C:\Program Files (x86)\Windows Kits\8.0\bin\x64\signtool.exe" sign /d "Your games name" /tr http://www.yourcertissuer.com/timestamp /a path\to\your\executable.exe In the command above we are using the signtool.exe binary, which comes with the Windows 8 development kit. There will likely be several copies of this executable on your disk and any one of them will do fine for this task. We specify the "friendly name" of our program using the /d parameter, as shown above, and the /tr parameter specifies the timestamp server as we discussed above. The command above can be used not only to sign executables, but also DLL files and OCX files, driver files, CLR bytecode, and just about any other type of windows executable you can imagine. Specifying the /a parameter to the signtool command simply tells it to use the first valid code signing certificate held within your registry to sign the file. If you followed this article to the letter this is where your code signing certificate and key will currently reside. I store my code signing certificate here as it is generally a secure place to put it, where you don't risk accidentally putting it into your code repository or into your network drives, encrypted or decrypted. Now you have finished the process, you can test your executable by double clicking it, and if your executable requires elevation (which most install packages etc do) then you will be presented with the friendly blue prompt: Summary Hopefully this article should give you some insight into how to sign your code. Signing your code is not just an awkward expense, in the current software and games market you should consider it important for anything you release to the public. It protects you, and it protects the people who want to play your game. If you have any questions about this article please do not hesitate to comment on this article below. Article Update Log 21 Apr 2015: Started work on article 7 May 2015: Initial release 15 Jul 2019: Removed references to StartCom/StartSSL who are no longer a trusted certificate authority.
  12. Mikael Henriksson

    Eleventh Entry - July 10, 2019

    Hello! This is the eleventh entry of my development blog for my project 'Tracked Mind'. I decided to not wait with a specific update that was needed to update the engine version that the game is based on, so I went back to a backed up version, but I didn't lose any progress (yay for backups!). I'm currently doing some level designing, I'm focusing on an apartment complex that the Player will have to go through. It's a bigger part of the game where a lot of story and lore gets revealed, so I will be busy with this part for a while. Along with that work I have been adding a new enemy that I mentioned during the last post, it's the creature "Draug", which might sound familiar if you have played The Elder Scrolls: Skyrim. The creature is actually part of Norse Mythology, and it's very different in this game compared to Skyrim's version of the creature. What's new since last post? Here are a few things: General changes - Added a new level - Added a new enemy: The Draug - Added a new model for some human enemies in the game, both the unarmed and armed ones. KNOWN ISSUES - Item stacking in the inventory. Thanks once again for reading! /Mikael Henriksson
  13. I'm Chris Eck, and I'm the tools developer at HBS for the Battletech project. I've recently been given permission to write up articles about some of the things I work on which I hope to post on a semi regular basis. Feel free to ask questions about these posts or give me suggestions for future topics. However please note, I am unable to answer any que