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Found 166 results

  1. Well, in my journey (and completion) of learning C#, I've come upon a rather peculiar problem. I don't know if it has to do with having high-functioning autism, which I do, but I seem to struggle to remember anything related to this. If I see it and am given an example I can copy and reproduce results from a simple tutorial, I can do it usually without error (if not too complex). When I attempt to write my own script, my brain completely goes white. I can't remember or figure out how to use different parts of the C# language, and it's like attempting to read Chinese when I look through Unity's Scripting API and look for other tutorials for supplemental learning. I take notes, I pay full attention to the videos and interact along with them, and I do attempt solitary practice. I just can't seem to get anything to "stick" to the point where it makes sense outside of a learning example. I can't seem to apply what I'm learning in reality, and it's becoming a great problem. Does anyone have any advice for getting this stuff to stick? I've always been a visual learner and a hands-on learner, but with logical stuff that isn't within the realms of art has always been something I've had a hard time learning and remembering later on. I appreciate any advice you can give. Thank you. EDIT: Updated on 11/11/2018 because I've been sick and busy AF with stuff outside of coding. I have been making great headway thanks to the set of tutorials made by http://rbwhitaker.wikidot.com. I was recommended this tutor by the user Septopus, and good gods has he been helpful at breaking down the stuff I didn't understand. I've been following along with the beginning C# tutorials, and will move on to MonoGame ones when I am comfortable. I cannot thank you all enough for the support and encouragement you've given. Just another sign I should keep going with this. Take care!
  2. Hi! I'm creating a spider solitaire game in my free time and will be adding daily challenges. There will be a challenge each day until the end of the month. After which, the challenges will reset for the next month. I do have some in mind but for a card game, creating unique challenges for each day is kind of tough. I played Microsoft's Spider Solitaire's daily challenges and found them to be the same/boring after a while. I would love to hear your ideas (unique) if any. Something different from the daily challenges created by Microsoft Spider Solitaire.
  3. Hi everyone. I am experienced web dev and I want to try creating games for Android, iOS platforms. I know PHP, JS, some Java. For beginning I'd like to create some maze game with many levels, different modes to play. After it I want to create some simple word game or some 2D runner. I need to choose right game engine. For now I have next options: Libgdx Unity Corona SDK So, my questions are: What game engine should I choose for beginning? What game engine should I choose for maze game? What game engine should I choose for word game and simple 2D runner? Thanks!
  4. Hi! How is XP calculated? For example, to reach level 4, the player should reach 200 XP and to reach level 5 player requires 450 XP. Is there a formula? Is there a tutorial available online? Any source where I can learn how XP is calculated? Can you give me a simple example from any existing game where the XP increases whether the player wins or loses? Thanks!
  5. James Proctor

    Unity Unity MMO Creators - Youtube channel

    I've started a Youtube channel for anyone wanting to make a Indie MMO using the Unity3d game engine. Topics include: Business Kickstarter uMMORPG kit Atavism SpatialOS Community Building Interviews And more You can access the channel here. Intro Video:
  6. James Proctor

    Unity Unity MMO Creators - Youtube channel

    I've started a Youtube channel for anyone wanting to make a Indie MMO using the Unity3d game engine. Topics include: Business Kickstarter uMMORPG kit Atavism SpatialOS Community Building Interviews And more You can access the channel here. Intro Video: View full story
  7. Admittedly my algebra skills are pretty darn poor. Never were particularly great either but I do remember really enjoying solving quadratics at school (a long long time ago). Does anyone know of any decent free online resources to "skill up" a little? Nothing serious, it doesn't need to be an online course as such, no qualifications required (managed to do alright without anything but basic maths skills most of my life) but it would be nice to improve a little at least.
  8. Hi there! How are offers decided? and when should they be shown to the player? I've seen offer pop-ups presented to the players during festive seasons, for example 'Get 50% off this Christmas', etc., Any tips? Examples?
  9. David Chadwick

    Defold Game Tutorial Series

    As many already know -- Defold is a completely free game engine which provides a fully turn-key solution for game development across iOS, Android, HTML5, Mac OS X, Windows and Linux platforms. It includes a Visual Editor, Lua Code Editor, Scene Editor, Particle Editor and Tile Editor. A full suite of integrated tools which supports the full cycle of game creation. I'm announcing a new series of tutorials which teaches each of the major capabilities of the Defold Game Engine -- with both introductory tutorials on how to use key Defold features, as well as more advanced tutorials which develop a full game project. The current tutorials in the series include: Introductory Tutorials Kickoff with the Defold Game Engine Defold Image Procedures Select, Drag and Drop of a Defold Game Object Game Object Movement Techniques Preliminary use of 2d Physics and Collisions Convex Shaped Collision Objects Animated GUI Nodes Introduction to Levels, Messages and Menus Defold Game Tutorials New Enhanced Defold Game Template Balloon Pop - Defold Game Project Tutorial CoinDrop - Defold Game Project Tutorial IceJump - Defold Game Project Tutorial The series is located at the following site: TactxStudios.com I hope you find these tutorials helpful in getting acquainted with the Defold tool. I'd appreciate any feedback on how I can make this series more productive. One last thought - on the site is a newletter signup -- I'd encourage you to join the mailing list. I'll be sending out notices as new tutorials are being added. All the very best - David C
  10. David Chadwick

    Defold Game Tutorial Series

    As many already know -- Defold is a completely free game engine which provides a fully turn-key solution for game development across iOS, Android, HTML5, Mac OS X, Windows and Linux platforms. It includes a Visual Editor, Lua Code Editor, Scene Editor, Particle Editor and Tile Editor. A full suite of integrated tools which supports the full cycle of game creation. I'm announcing a new series of tutorials which teaches each of the major capabilities of the Defold Game Engine -- with both introductory tutorials on how to use key Defold features, as well as more advanced tutorials which develop a full game project. The current tutorials in the series include: Introductory Tutorials Kickoff with the Defold Game Engine Defold Image Procedures Select, Drag and Drop of a Defold Game Object Game Object Movement Techniques Preliminary use of 2d Physics and Collisions Convex Shaped Collision Objects Animated GUI Nodes Introduction to Levels, Messages and Menus Defold Game Tutorials New Enhanced Defold Game Template Balloon Pop - Defold Game Project Tutorial CoinDrop - Defold Game Project Tutorial IceJump - Defold Game Project Tutorial The series is located at the following site: TactxStudios.com I hope you find these tutorials helpful in getting acquainted with the Defold tool. I'd appreciate any feedback on how I can make this series more productive. One last thought - on the site is a newletter signup -- I'd encourage you to join the mailing list. I'll be sending out notices as new tutorials are being added. All the very best - David C View full story
  11. UPDATE Update System I have just finished the back-end programming for update game data using unity asset bundle, Firebase?!! and setting some Google Firebase Features for login in Play Games Service, storing user data (Money, Username, etc), and store game data for update (asset bundles). Offline Mode I made some code to handle game if it is has no internet connection. Lighting System I try to research 2D Dynamic Lighting System with Normal Map and other methods. Animation I put some 2D animation for lighting system research. Assets My Game Artist still busy, so I still try to make the graphic assets for research purpose, I really do not want to hurt your eyes 😉.
  12. I'm very often facing one small problem when trying to learn some new stuff - hard to choose what to learn next. Even if the problem seems to be small it has a very huge impact on the final result I think. And because Game Programming offers so much to learn, I'm always feeling that I'm missing something important and wasting my time learning something not important or unneeded. Or usually, I'm afraid to focus on something specific and huge for a long time, because I think that I'll spend all my time on that particular filed and will not be able to solve another problem. So I've tried to fit all my thoughts in this questions. 1) Are you trying to cover all the aspects of Game Programming? Or you trying to focus on some specific aspects like physics, animations, or networking etc. 2) What is your way to find a new theory or whatever else for your learning process? (Manuals, Courses, Books, Documentation? etc.) 3) When you trying to learn while practicing, are you search for learning because of a problem that appears, or because you wants to try new things? How do you choose this new thing? And finally, Which of this two approaches was the best for you if any? Not actually in the scope of the topic, but I'm also very interested to hear your thoughts on this. What is Game Programming for you? How would you describe what should Game Programmer able to solve?
  13. I´ve been searching in the web since last year and couldn´t find an answer. All I find are "recommendation" posts that are based on preferences or trivial and ambiguous matters such as difficulty. If It takes me 1 year to master SFML and it takes me 2 years mastering Opengl and the other libraries needed; I would choose Opengl; because I would be wasting 1 year in something that has only hobby uses. If I invest a year in learning something I would like to make a profit from It. Also If an Engine would be moer job-wise, I would choose that instead. I am in second year (finishing) in Software Engineering (in Argentina) and have advanced knowledge in C, C++, C#, Net, Web languages; and a little of Assembly. So I don't need the basics of language. I found SFML and It comes with a bunch of services (net, audio, graphics) and used it a bit, and found it quite information-less; I heard about DirectX and Opengl, but all I find is "It is verry difficult, use SFML". If you ask me about hobby, I would like somethinc close to code and efitient; for 2d graphics that I could draw myself. If you ask me about work, I would choose something that could help me get a Job. What would be awesome is, if there is something that could be a mixture of that. Thanks in advance, Santiago.
  14. k0fe

    Quest a day challenge

    The first week of October is over. I was writing quests and NPCs. The main goal was to write at least one quest a day. And this is really interesting and fun! My total result for this week is 15 quests and 20 NPCs. There is a lot of work on polishing ‘em all but at least I captured the main idea on every quest and NPC. Today I skipped and did nothing but analyze the whole result. Tried to make a document where I can store quest data (conditions, dialogues, rewards, stages and thoughts). Now I’m planning on prototyping quests via Creation Kit (Skyrim). But still there are relatively negative moments. I’m not satisfied because there is no real motivation for a player to complete those quests (as I think) and quests a simple as hell. They are more MMO like actually. Yes, they are not about killing n amount of slimes but still they don’t force player to use game features. Like why should anyone get fun from a quest that is fully independent from the game? Or maybe good narrative is enough for an engaging & fun adventure? This made me think about the main game mechanics. Those that player will use real often regardless of the playstyle. Of course I should start from movement as my game features an extended movement system which includes crawling and climbing mechanics. Example: Assassins Creed where player MUST use those mechs, so he can climb up to a viewpoint and open quests markings on a map and he MAY use them to avoid enemy NPCs in a different type of situations. This mechanics was used in solving puzzles and getting to a right place quests. Well, will see how all of this thoughts, quests and NPCs will evolve a week after 😛
  15. I'm doing research at the moment, and I came across some interesting things with Window Styles for OpenGL on Windows platform: WS_CLIPCHILDREN and WS_CLIPSIBLINGS are both required for OpenGL applications. WS_POPUP is preferred over WS_OVERLAPPEDWINDOW, WS_OVERLAPPED, and WS_POPUPWINDOW. But, it didn't say if it's required, or it's explicitly not necessary for OpenGL applications. WS_BORDER is also required for OpenGL applications. WS_VISIBLE is necessary as a precaution. So all of those explanations are just comments and posts spread out across many different forums, answer posts, StackOverflow, and on old MSDN blog comments. There's too many to list, so I just wanted brevity over having to cite out quite a bit of references. Anyway, what I personally don't understand about the Window Styles is: How do I describe the effects of WS_CLIPCHILDREN and WS_CLIPSIBLINGS on an OpenGL application? Its uses has some uses related to how OpenGL applications have their own pixel formats supported by the device context, and how it may be possible for a parent window to spawn children windows and somehow, miraculously clipping each other. Or, maybe the flag is put there mainly so the parent window, or the primary OpenGL application window, is prevented from being clipped by any children and parent siblings (windows)? Why is it preferrable to use WS_POPUP over WS_OVERLAPPEDWINDOW? I am speculating it has to do with toggling fullscreen and windowed mode for any OpenGL application, but, does that mean, just by setting WS_POPUP, it is enough to have fullscreen toggling support? Or, does it require that the window itself need to set/remove certain Window Styles, so WS_POPUP = fullscreen, and then WS_OVERLAPPED | ~(WS_POPUP) is used for windowed mode? Why is WS_VISIBLE necessary? Does that mean it can skip a step for setting the window to be visible? WS_BORDER is for windowed mode only, and thus it's required? Or that fullscreen and windowed mode both need WS_BORDER to function? So, those are my questions I have right now. Am I correct to assume all if these? Thanks in advance.
  16. Greedy Goblin

    Look what I found....

    Haha! Take a look what I uncovered the other day while digging through my books.... It even came with a good old floppy disk! (I couldn't even use it if I wanted to now)... This book was my very first on 3D graphics programming, before 3D graphics card were even a thing (for the mainstream masses anyway). Published in 1994, it's a book that served as a really good primer to understanding 3D geometry and programming even if I never bothered with the later chapters on curved geometry. All the code samples were in C (not even C++) and there was no such mention of things such as texture mapping (although it did cover shadows, reflections and refraction!). It took you right from the beginning; from the equation of a straight line, translations, matrices etc to projections (viewing pyramid) and clipping algorithms. Great stuff! I still find it useful now as I re-read the introductory chapters and refresh myself on a few basics. My other go-to book is "Real Time Collision Detection" by Christer Ericson - an absolute diamond of a book! Do you guys and girls have any books that you rely on or hold in high regard for your game development? It would be interesting to know if anyone has ever seen or read the Georg Glaeser book above. Anyway, I'll soon have another update on The Berg, but it's bed time for me now. Night all.
  17. JoAndRoPo

    Store Values

    Hi! Question#1 - Is it OK to take another game store values for my game? Will, there be any issues of any kind? Question#2 - How are store values calculated? For example, the below values is taken from Clash Royale... 80 Gems for $0.99, 500 Gems for $4.99, 1200 Gems for $9.99, 2500 Gems for $19.99, 6500 Gems for $49.99, 14000 Gems for $99.99 How are 1200 gems calculated for $9.99? and so on...
  18. Hi! I'm looking for a c++ hobbyist (intermediate experience, due to difficulty level) interested in helping recreating some basic core Splatoon mechanics to learn and practice. Ink (painting, teamcolor) Player controls (squid form, humanoid form, camera) Weapons (shooter, charger, and roller). I already have some techniques in mind for creating the ink, which I'd discuss privately in a DM. ^^ Discord: Agent#8875
  19. Heyo, I represent Node Collective LLC and we're making a large open world, FPS style game. Something sort of like Farcry 5. We already established a large team of professionals and college grads. We're in need of many more programmers for UE4. So if anyone is wishing to develop their skill, and pick up some of the slack for mechanics, that'd be awesome! Contact: sakirintannoy@gmail.com Discord: Sakirin is Cool#0850 - Sakirin More project information will be posted upon contact with the company.
  20. Hi, I’d like to show you my current video project “Game Audio Lookout”. It is not a game itself but a series on YouTube about how music and sound design in games work. There is three episodes I produced within the last month and I’m planning to release them on a regular basis! Currently I made 3 episodes so far: Enhancing Gameplay with Music in Celeste - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NYjlfL7dHCQ On the surface, “Celeste” is a brutally hard 2D platforming game about climbing the imaginary Celeste Mountain but it is much more than that. It narrates a compelling story of main character Madeline fighting with her demon doppelgänger. Gameplay-wise, super tricky levels combined with tight controls let you fail and re-try over and over again. But what it makes it even more enjoyable is the wonderful soundtrack composed by Lena Raine we’ll have a look at in this episode of “Game Audio Lookout”. EarthBound - A Quirky Artistic Synergy of Story, Art and Music - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZH4DqgvkE0k In fact, there’s many ways how the three elements writing, artwork and sound can play together. There’s AAA titles with cinematic writing, photorealistic graphics and epic orchestral music on the one hand. Another good example is the “Super Mario Odyssey” world “Steam Gardens” with its funky vibes due to a coherent artistic feel of character design, graphics and audio. But today, we’ll go back to the Super Nintendo era to have a look at one of the strangest games Nintendo ever created: “Earthbound” Deconstructing a Musical Level in Rayman Legends - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3UIhBZuj2HI Rayman Legends has found its way into many “Best Platformer Games of All-Time” lists. Though it closely fails to beat the uncrowned king Super Mario, it found a safe place next the Nintendo mascot. The Rayman series was created by French game designer Michel Ancel and started in 1995 with the 2D jump’n’run Rayman. It was followed by two 3D platforming games: Rayman 2 and Rayman 3. But the series went back to 2D sidescrolling with Rayman Origins in 2011. Origins was also the first Rayman game using the UbiArt Framwork which also was adopted by the 2013 release “Rayman Legends”. In this episode we’ll deconstruct one of the incredible musical stages in Rayman Legends. Playlist link to all episodes so far: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NYjlfL7dHCQ&list=PLBhIWrMLhhmowCQyCRaDEMWDH-l5lunnL Link to my channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCm4XW_MrNfZrjQkj9iuxK9A
  21. I'm taking my first steps in programming with Direct3D. I have a very basic pipeline setup, and all I want to get from it is an antialiased smooth image. But I get this: First, I can't get rid of stair effect though I have 4x MSAA enabled already in my pipeline (DXGI_SAMPLE_DESC::Count is 4 and Quality is 0): And second, I get this noisy texturing though I have mipmaps generated and LINEAR filtering set in the sampler state. Am I missing something or doing wrong? I would appreciate any advice on that. Here is my code: 1) Renderer class: 2) Vertex shader: 3) Pixel shader: Thank you in advance!
  22. Ruslan Sibgatullin

    Seven Tips for Starting Game Developers

    Originally posted on Medium Well, it’s been a ride. My first game Totem Spirits is now live. I’m not gonna tell you how awesome the game is (since you may try it yourself :) ). Instead I want to share my own experience as a developer and highlight some useful tips for those interested in game development. First of all, short background information about myself — I’m 26 now and have about 22 years of a game playing experience (yes, that’s right the first games I played at age 3–4, one of them was Age of Empires) and slightly more than three years of professional career as a Java developer. Alright, let’s dive into the topic itself now. There are seven tips I’ve discovered while creating the game: 1. The team is the main asset. Yes, even the smallest game dev studios have a team of a few people. I literally give a standing ovation to those guys who are able to create a whole game product only by themselves (I know only one example of such). In my team there were one artist, one UX-designer\artist, one sound designer, and myself — programmer\game designer\UX-designer. And here comes the first tip: you should tip 1: Delegate the work you are not qualified in to the professionals. Just a few examples why: Firstly, I tried to find the sounds myself, spent a few days on it and ended up with a terrible mix of unsuitable and poorly created sound samples. Then, I found a guy who made a great set of sounds for less than $15. The first version of promo video was, well, horrible, because I thought I’m quite good at it. Fortunately, I met an UX-designer who made this cool version you may find at the beginning of this post. I can see now why there are so many, let’s say, strange-looking games with horrible art assets and unlistenable music. Well, you just can’t have the same level of professionalism in everything. 2. Game development is not free. You would have to spend your time or\and your money. I mean, if you want to create a good-looking and playable product you need to invest in it. To be honest, I think that not each and every product out there in the markets can be called a “Game”, since many of them are barely playable. As for my game I’ve spend about $1200 on the development and slightly more than 2 years of my life. Still think that it’s worth every penny and every minute, since I gained a lot of experience in programming which boosted my professional career. tip 2: Take it seriously, investments are necessary. 3. Respect the product. The development process is painful, you will want to quit several(many)times. But if the game you’re building is the one you would enjoy playing yourself it would make the process more interesting and give it additional meaning. The third tip is my main keynote. tip 3: Build a game you would want to play yourself. 4. Share it with the closest friends and relatives, BUT… tip 4: …choose beta-testers wisely. If you don’t want to pay extra money for professional testers then friends\colleagues\relatives are gonna be the first ones to test the game. Try to find what kind of games they like since probably not each of them represents your target audience. And I suggest sharing the product not earlier that in the “beta” stage — otherwise you would need to explain a lot of game rules and that would harm the user experience and you gain almost nothing useful out of it. 5. Make use of your strengths. It will cost you less if you know how to code or how to create an assets. In my case, I didn’t need to hire a programmers or game designers. No one is able to implement your idea better than you, that’s why I suggest to tip 5: Take as many roles in the project as possible. But do not forget about the tip 1. 6. Don’t waste too much time on planning. No, you still need to have some kind of a roadmap and game design document, just tip 6: Make documentation flexible. You would probably need to change it many times. In my case a lot of great ideas had come during the development process itself. And don’t be afraid to share your ideas within a team and listen to their ideas as well! 7. You will hate your game at some point. That may sound sad, but that’s true. After a ten-thousandth launch you just hate the game. You may be tempted to start a new “better”, “more interesting”, etc. project at that point, but, please, tip 7: Don’t give up! Make it happen. Share the game with the world since you’ve put a lot of effort into it. Those tips I’ve discovered mostly for myself and more than sure that for a game industry giants the list above may sound like a baby talk. Nevertheless I still think it might be useful for those dreaming to create the best game ever.
  23. Ruslan Sibgatullin

    First game crash report

    Originally posted on Medium The Totem Spirits game is in the market for a few weeks already and this day came inevitably — I received the first crash report. To be honest, there were 5 of them, but all from one device, so the error is the same. I was truly surprised by this! My game was tested by several people and already downloaded by 50+ more. There were no errors till November 7th when someone with Samsung Galaxy Trend Plus (768MB RAM, Android 4.2) got the game. If by any chance you are reading this article, please, know that I’m deeply sorry that you can’t play! Then, I checked the error (aka stack trace) and became even more surprised because this error… told me nothing. Of course I can find the exact place in the code where this problem occurred but there is literally nothing wrong with it! (It works for 50+ other devices, remember?). Moreover, it is not reproducible on any of my devices — I even ran the game without any issues on an old Acer Liquid MT (which BTW was released 7 years ago). Looks like a dead-end one might say, but I didn’t give up. There are several ways to ask for help in the developer’s world. In this case I decided to create a topic on libGDX (game engine) forum and ask them directly because the issue seems to be in the core library itself. In addition to this I also asked a question on StackOverflow (so unpredictable). Now it’s time to give a little insight into the error. The crash report in Google Play Console looks like this: Even if you are not familiar with libGDX, you may find some keywords like: xml, parser, fileHandle, rootElement from which you can guess that the error lies somewhere in xml file parsing. And this is totally correct! The application on this device failed to parse locally stored file needed for the game to behave properly. What was even stranger — look at the stack trace once again. Have you noticed that there are no custom messages in exceptions? But the developers of the game engine are quite smart guys so the messages are actually exist in the source code. Looks like magic to me… Although, there were some problems with the engine itself too, I fixed’em already with this PR . As sad as it sounds, so far there is no resolution, but I’m not going to give up on this. When you develop for hundreds different Android devices occasional errors are inevitable. It is just impossible to test a product on each and every smartphone out there. But I believe every problem should be fixed anyhow. After all, if there is no other way some devices may be marked as “Excluded” in Google Developer Console. No support — no problems, right? :)
  24. Originally posted on Medium I released my first game approximately a month and a half ago and actually tried almost all of the methods I could find on various websites out there - all of them will be listed here. With this article I want to share the story of my “promotion campaign”. The very first thing I did was the Medium account creation. I decided to promote the game using thematic articles about game development and related stuff. Well, actually, I still do this, even with this article here :) In addition to Medium the same articles were posted to my Linkedin profile, but mostly to strengthen it. Moreover, you may find a separate topic on Libgdx website (the framework the game is written on). Then, the press release was published. Actually, you should do a press release the same day as the game launch, but I didn’t know about that back then. And to be honest, all of the methods above were not quite successful in terms of game promotion. So I decided to increase the game presence around the web and started to post articles on various indie-game dev related websites and forums (that's how this blog started) Finally, here comes the list of everything created over the past month (some in Russian, be aware): https://www.igdb.com/games/totem-spirits http://www.slidedb.com/games/totem-spirits https://forums.tigsource.com/index.php?topic=63066.0 https://www.gamedev.net/forums/topic/693334-logical-puzzle-totem-spirits/ http://www.gamedev.ru/projects/forum/?id=231428 https://gamejolt.com/games/totem_spirits/298139 https://vk.com/gameru.indie?w=wall-9222155_202256 https://test4test.io/gameDetails/24 Not so many one can say. But I could not find any more good services! If you know one, please, share in comments. What are the results you may ask? Well, I have to admit that they are terrible. I got a little less than a hundred downloads, and I’m pretty sure that most of them from the relatives and friends. And you can’t really count such as a genuine downloads, since I literally just asked them to get my game on their smartphones. But the good thing is that many of those who played Totem Spirits shared their impressions about the game. They truly liked the product! That was so pleasant to hear their thoughts. I know in person several people who finished the game with all diamonds (a.k.a stars) collected. Still, I don’t regret the time spent on the game because I’ve learnt a great lesson — two years of development is a way too much for such simple and narrow-profile game. It seems that now is not a good time for such complicated puzzlers or I just failed badly with the promotion) Now the next plan is to develop and launch a game in a maximum 160 hours (two working months). The coding process has already begun, so hopefully in January you will see the next product of Pudding Entertainment company!
  25. Since my last update, i have implemented most of the attributes in Cycling - The board game. Quick recap: the game is about getting to the finish line first. Each turn, each player rolls a dice (D6) and moves the amount of squares. The odds of the dice are rigged based on the player's strength (higher strength = better odds). Next to the dice roll the player can gain bonuses to move additional squares. These bonuses are based on their attributes (which can range from 1 - 20). Now that i have implemented them, i have to check if they add fun to the game. Fun is of course hard to measure, but what i am aiming for mostly is balance between the different elements. For example, if one attribute is much more important than others, the others are irrelevant. To test them, i left my computer running for a night and simulate over 600 different races with different AI players (with every time different attributes and strength). I now had a lot of data points to analyse with. I decided to use a multiple regression analysis, where i analysed the impact of the strength and all the different attributes on the outcome of the race. This led to the following results: R-squared: 0.43 Coefficient of different attributes Strength -4,59 Climbing -3,60 SoloRiding -3,06 GroupTechnique -3,04 Flair -1,57 Sprinting -0,93 Restoration -0,84 Starting Position -0,73 Determination -0,51 Composure -0,36 Luck 0,12 Conclusions This stuff really makes me feel like a nerd, which is nice 😉 The R squared means that more than half of the results are not explained by this model The fact that all attributes are negative is correct (the higher the attribute, the lower your total final time) The attribute luck has a different sign, which basically means that a lower attribute is better (although the coefficient is very small, so technically it means that it is not relevant) Strength is more important than all the different attributes Climbing, solo riding and group technique are most important Composure and determination hardly matter at all I am somewhat happy with these outcomes, but find it difficult to determine my final goal here. I think it is not a good idea to have all attributes at (roughly) the same value, since then it won't matter which one you improve at all. On the other hand, an extremely large difference between attributes, means that your strategy should be to simply focus on the best attributes, which is also technically not really fun. For now, my next move will be to make the lowest three attributes somewhat more influential so that they matter more. When that is done, i am just going to continue playtesting manually and get a feeling for how the game is running. At that point i will also upload a new version, so i can (hopefully) get some feedback on the game itself. In the meantime, please feel free to try out the game yourself (link) or even better, let me know what your ideas would be to further balance the game. Thank you once again for reading!
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