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Found 108 results

  1. Throughout my game programming courses I've been developing essentially a prototype for the game I ultimately want to make. We have a class in the curriculum that teaches us about the Proof of Concept and how to develop it. I plan to finish the prototype, hopefully within the next few months with a small group of friends. Ok that's great, I have a prototype, I have a proof of concept, what do I do now? What's the best way to get this out there, how do I pitch these two things? What's the classic method for getting these into people's hands, make a meeting with a publisher and see if they'll bite? Is crowdsourcing a better option for a small team? Does it have distinct advantages over the classic method? Are there disadvantages to crowdsourcing that a small team should be aware of? In the PoC you list the game's selling points, do those translate effectively into a crowdsourcing program account? I've seen the power of crowdsourcing, I mean Star Citizen just hit $200M, but I'm no Chris Roberts. For us non-legends of the video game world, what's effective and why?
  2. Make the most of the digital world by reaching out to industry influencers without spending money. Get this guide to approaching influencers and find success in spreading the word as an indie developer. Getting noticed in the vast digital world, with its myriad social networks and other channels of influence, might appear to require mountains of money and resources. This could be a problem for indie game developers with limited budgets. Expensive PR agencies might have once been the only option, but today's internet-based marketing channels are free for the asking. The networks and people who can provide the exposure you need often have as much to gain from your success as you do—it's your content that keeps them in business. More than they create, influencers endorse and attract. They need a constant flow of new and visionary material to keep viewers interested. Indie game developers can feed that appetite for content as well as any major game studio, but how do you make that connection? Read more
  3. Can you picture it...? Yotes Games, out there among the other young hopefuls, trying to convince anybody walking by to give this little pony RPG a shot. By all means, it outta do as great as it did at Orlando Overdrive but with a much bigger crowd over the span of 3 days instead of 1. Serious planning has begun, so far it's only been preemptive measures and bookmarking things to come back to later. Now I'm getting down the fine details of everything I need to know, do, study, and purchase in order to make the most out of this Magfest trip.More on yotesgames.com
  4. Game developers work extremely hard to get their titles in front of gamers but what more can PC resellers do to help developers grow? See what answer Intel® has and how they plan on expanding your game's reach. Game developers work hard to get their titles in front of gamers, immediately upon release. A new title generally commands its full retail price during the first few months, but promotional sales are a common practice to increase sales and players once a title has been in the market for a while. Reaching More Gamers, Sooner Media sites such as IGN, Metacritic, Slate, FANDOM, GAMESBEAT, Engadget, YouTube, Twitch.tv and PCMag.com help get the word out about new titles through news, reviews, events and influencer opinions. Many game developers also have promotional relationships (some exclusive) with major platform players like Intel, nVIDIA, Sony (PlayStation), Microsoft (Xbox), and PC OEMs. Intel offers Starter Packs through PC OEMs to get titles in front of gamers. Consumers may get a “pack” of select titles and downloadable content with the purchase of a qualifying system. We’ve run that program for five years, and we expect millions of bundles to be sold in 2017, supporting hundreds of PC resellers and retailers, worldwide. Can you imagine the number of gamers we reach? In addition, Intel® Extreme Masters eSports tournaments and expanding global and regional gaming events help more gamers hear about and experience new titles. Read more
  5. Jean Simonet is an indie developer who moved away from the AAA space in 2013 after delivering Skyrim and realizing that Fallout 4 just had him doing more of the same. Jean challenged himself and succeeded. In this talk, Jean runs a counterstrike on every piece of indie gaming advice you've ever been told.
  6. Jean Simonet is an indie developer who moved away from the AAA space in 2013 after delivering Skyrim and realizing that Fallout 4 just had him doing more of the same. Jean challenged himself and succeeded. In this talk, Jean runs a counterstrike on every piece of indie gaming advice you've ever been told. View full story
  7. So here's a quick background: I now have the fantastic opportunity to put my Wild West RPG (I know, odd timing for a Wild West game) on the [redacted] platform and have a second chance to possibly find the audience that I was unable to find on Steam. In order to maximize my chances of this, I am taking great care to improve the storefront/box art of the game. Unfortunately, I'm not a great artist and have little sense of visual design. Now I wanted to post this in the "Business" forum because the point here is not just to make a great piece of art, ultimately it has to achieve it's purpose - does it attract the right people who would be interested in my product? Speaking of said product, here you can find it on Steam and here's some images from my website. Originally, I tried very hard and came up with this - which, while very good for me, is not so good by actual game box art standards. (Click for actual size) I didn't get a lot of specific feedback on that. I heard things like "badly drawn" and mostly "there's too much going on" and "the eye doesn't know where to look." See? I just don't get visual design. So the [redacted] Storefront needs images at 1000x1000 px so I made these four new versions: Version A: This uses the same concept but I increased some of the saturation and made it even more colorful and moved a few things around. The focal point of the image is more concentrated on the fire. (Click for actual size) Version B: So then I was thinking... maybe there is too much going on. I looked at other examples of storefront art and realized that they usually just have a single thing happening. So I removed the characters, which aren't that well drawn anyway, and just have the fire. Maybe this adds some mystery so people will be more likely to visit the storefront when they see this image? (Click for actual size) Version 😄 Here I'm starting to think, this is a pixel art RPG, so why hide from that? Why not show that to people up front so the audience that is interested in such things can identify it more easily? This one has the same campfire concept, but now I'm using the pixel art. (Click for actual size) Version 😧 I thought that maybe that last one was too dark and wanted to try something else. This one just has a sunset over a cemetery with a couple of the characters while still showing the observer, yes this game is pixel art. (Click for actual size) Version E: This one is similar to the last although the logo is featured more prominently and there are no character sprites. Somehow the colors look better here to me. (Click for actual size) Version F: Version E which is not pictured here, is the option that says "None of these four would be good enough box art, instead pay an actual artist to make new box art." If it's the best way to maximize this games potential I'm happy to go with this option. Version G: This suggestion says "Your concept is good, but there are too many artistic flaws. You should pay an actual artist to improve upon what you have and/or clean up the uglier bits that they can point out." If you vote for this option, please also pick which version (A, B, C, D or E) is your preferred concept. So please vote below for Version A, B, C, D, E, F or G and add your feedback in the replies blow. I really appreciate all your feedback. I'm flying solo here so I don't often get it! Version H: Here's a new version I made after posting this from suggestions another artist gave me. It's zoomed in just two characters and some colors and shading are different. The fire is smaller to distract less.
  8. Street Fighter celebrated its 30th anniversary in 2017 and Steve Hendershot captured the history of the series to a depth not previously seen. Steve travelled the world to meet with all the personalities involved in the Street Fighter epic, from artists and producers in Japan to Esports champions from various communities. Steve shared his story with us at PixelFest 2018. PixelFest - "growing artists and programmers through love of games" PixelFest.org View full story
  9. Street Fighter celebrated its 30th anniversary in 2017 and Steve Hendershot captured the history of the series to a depth not previously seen. Steve travelled the world to meet with all the personalities involved in the Street Fighter epic, from artists and producers in Japan to Esports champions from various communities. Steve shared his story with us at PixelFest 2018. PixelFest - "growing artists and programmers through love of games" PixelFest.org
  10. Hi, I would like to invite you to submit your games to the IX F&S Play Indie Awards. The deadline is October 31th. It´s free to submit your games. F&S Play has established 1 award of 7,000 euros for the best Indie Game Category. The 10 finalists will also receive a free Booth for showing their games in the F&S Indie Zone. Check out the rules here: F&S Play is the new name for the previously called AzPlay (Bilbao, Spain). It has become consolidated as one international reference for the promotion of new projects, awarding prizes every year to the most original, creative and innovative independent videogames of the moment. Over 1.100 projects from the 5 continents have been received during these 8 years and over 250,000 euros in prize money distributed. The integration of AzPlay in a festival as renowned as the Fun&Serious reinforces both events and consolidates the Fun&Serious in the international scene. More info about past Fun&Serious editions here: http://www.funandseriousgamefestival.com/ More info about past AzPlay editions here: http://www.azplaybilbao.com/en/ediciones-anteriores/
  11. When you need to share a pre-release version of a game with a showcase, reviewer, alpha-testers, etc, what do you do? I know Steam and VivePort offer some closed alpha-release options. I've seen a service mentioned called "Pre-flight" on the MIVS FAQ (http://super-archive.magfest.org/mivsfaq) but I can't seem to find it. What other options are there and how well have they worked in your experience? -M
  12. sskocean

    Ad Network Dilema

    We are a mobile game development startup and we published our 1st game a few days back and used admob in our games. After publishing the game we have not done any marketing and got only 15 installs so far and only earned around $0.10 USD through that game in admob. However admob terminated our adsense account saying that we did some Invalid Activity and the account can not be reinstated. We are very sure that none of our team members clicked on ads or played the game with the live ads. So I have a theory that some user clicked on our ads multiple times and our account was flagged due to that. We tried to communicate with admob team but we got automated replies. Now we are thinking of adding another ad network like mopub,chartboost,unityads,etc to our 1st game and the other 2 games which we will be launching in 1-2 weeks. Now the question i have is how can we prevent our account from getting suspended from them, also can we get a account manager from them who can handle our request and listen to our side of argument if something like this happens in future. Our plan is to launch around more games in 2018 and a lot more in 2019 but we are now in a delima which ad network to use.
  13. Hi all, My name is Supereor. I recently developed a game titled Night of the Red Cubes: Crimson Tide (link here if you are curious), and now that it's on the Play Store, I am wondering if there is any good way to market it and get it to people that might be interested in it. I am all for fixing bugs and trying to listen to people that have issues with it, but the game has no community at the moment to tell me what's wrong. I totally understand that the Play Store likely has thousands of new games coming out every week for it, but I wonder if there is any way to get your game noticed among them, or if it is a lost cause altogether. Does anyone has any tips on how to market a game on the Play Store (preferably tips that won't cost too much)? Or even feedback on why you wouldn't play it?
  14. https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/sos-cc/id1410850484?mt=8 View the full article
  15. There are a lot of blog posts online teaching indie developers “how to write proper press releases for their new games,” and they all provide different (and sometimes conflicting) information. It’s confusing. So, for the past week, I’ve spent my afternoons taking notes on all the useful information within each one, reaching out to established game developers to get their advice on how to write killer game press releases, and talking with PR pros in both game development and outside marketing environments to gather the absolute best information possible on the subject. This post combines all my findings. By the end, you’ll never have to read another “how to write a press release” post again. Sound good? Let’s start with the basics: What is a press release? A press release is a 1-to-2-page piece of writing that announces new and exciting projects you’ve been working on. The purpose of the release is to inform journalists and media sources about your news so they can (hopefully) publish stories about your work. They’re usually written in the third person — in other words, they’re written as if a journalist is writing about your game when in reality it’s just your writing. Press releases are usually distributed through distribution tools or PR firms — but as an indie developer, they’re mainly used to help journalists solidify a story about your news when you pitch them over email. We’ll talk more pitching writers later, but for now, understand this: Getting press is a great way to drive traffic to your new projects and can save you thousands of dollars in advertising costs if done right, so press releases are important! When should you publish press releases? Press releases are typically published when you announce: A new game Game-changing new features or technology Events Partnerships (or other business-related news, like investments or grants (thanks Unreal)) New research Awards Or a resolution to a crisis (which hopefully isn’t your case) …and that’s it for the basics. Now let’s cover the steps for writing your release. Step 1: Find your angle Here’s a brutal truth: No one pays attention to news that isn’t new or interesting. This is especially true for journalists. So without an interesting “story angle” you can take when announcing your news, no one’s going to pay attention to yours either. Gabby DaRienzo, creator of A Mortician’s Tale and co-founder of Laundry Bear, said it best: How do you find that “unique selling point,” you ask? Lewis Denby, creator of the indie dev PR firm Game If You Are (this firm is great for indie devs — check it out!), recommends observing your original motivations for creating your game: A great example of a USP (unique selling point) comes from Numinous Games, creator of Galaxies of Hope, who developed their game to help neuroendocrine tumor patients understand their diagnoses: Taken from an Apple App Store article written about Wahmann’s game. The combination of Numinous Game’s inspiration for creating the game (to help neuroendocrine tumor patients) along with their unique selling point (a game that teaches people about neuroendocrine tumors) makes for a killer story any games journalists would be happy to cover. THAT’s your goal. * * * After you’ve found your angle, it’s time to start the boring s**t. Step 2: Write your headline and subheadline. A good headline serves two purposes: It shows the reader what’s being announced immediately, clearly, and concisely… …and it entices the reader to read the subheadline or first paragraph. A simple formula to follow when writing headlines is “[x] does [y],” like in the following releases: SkyBox Labs Brings Bedrock Version of Minecraft to Nintendo Switch Slitherine is nominated as Economic Disruptor of the Year Keywords Studios acquires Snowed In Studios Bandai Namco Amusement Lab Inc. established for VR arcade development Aaron Marsden writes captivating article about indie game press releases (in his humble opinion) Don’t bury any information here, but don’t make it too boring either. No one wants to read a press release titled “Game Studio releases New Game.” Strike a balance between conciseness and charm and your headline will do just fine. Tip: Great headlines are always written under 18 words. Subheadline The purpose of your subheadline is to expand on the headline if it’s not enough to fully capture your reader’s attention. It serves as an extra “attention grabber” that boosts your readers into the heart of your release. In Numinous Games’ case, the headline and subheadline of their press release could look something like: Headline: “Numinous Games releases Galaxies of Hope for Neuroendocrine Cancer Sufferers” Subheadline: “Game aims to help NET patients understand and cope with their diagnoses” I’d read it. Step 3: Write the first paragraph The first paragraph is the most important part of your press release. Although the headline/subheadline captures your reader’s attention, the first paragraph is what locks them into the piece and keeps them there for the rest of the way. Your first paragraph should answer the all-important “5 W’s”: who, what, when, where, and why. Who’s the press release about? (This will be your company) What’s happening? (This will be your announcement) When will it happen? (The date of your announcement) Where is it happening? (ex. What platforms is your game releasing on, where is your event occurring, etc.) Why is it important? Coschedule, a marketing application, provides this useful template in their blog post for writing effective first paragraphs: [WHO: COMPANY] today announced it will [WHAT] at [WHERE] on [WHEN]. The [EVENT/ANNOUNCEMENT] will provide [BENEFIT] for [AUDIENCE]. Here’s a great example from E-Home Entertainment, the developer of a new game, Gene Rain: Ignore the grammatical errors in the second sentence for now. I’ll say it again: be sure you’re providing the most important information up-front. No burying. (also, stay away from cliches — everyone has “the best game” or “the most exciting gameplay.”) Step 4: The second paragraph The purpose of the second paragraph is to elaborate more on your game and why it’s important to you and to your players. A great way to do this is with a personal quote. As an indie dev, personal quotes allow you to dive deeper into your USP— what compelled you to create your game in the first place? What problem does it solve and how do you hope it helps your players? That’s the information your quote should contain. In the App Store article I referenced earlier, Amy Green of Numinous Games provides a great quote where she talks about the game’s purpose of sharing stories from other tumor patients: Notice how Amy’s quote fits perfectly into the context of her game’s story — this is exactly how you should format yours. Your goal is to make it as easy as possible for journalists to write stories about you, and allowing them to grab a relevant quote straight from your press release without an interview is a great way to do that. Note: In your actual press release, your quote should be a bit longer than Amy’s and should be written in third person. I don’t have the original press release for their game, but if I were to guess, the quote was written something like: “Our goal with Galaxies of Hope was not only to share Maryann’s personal story with NET, but also to help other patients,” said Amy Green of Numinous Games. “It meant so much to tell our own story through this medium that we started thinking about how we could share the stories of others.” Step 5: The third paragraph (Don’t worry, we’re almost done.) The third paragraph completes your story. This is usually where you’ll write about the nitty-gritty details of your game: When writing your third paragraph, ask yourself: “What’s interesting about my game from a player’s perspective? What makes it enjoyable? What could I say to get potential players excited?” That’s what you should describe here. I really love Magicka’s third (and fourth) paragraphs in their press release for their PvP mode. Notice how they’ve divulged just enough information to excite their players on the new mode: (Their tone is killer, too.) Step 6 (Optional): Key, bulleted features If your game has some interesting features that wouldn’t fit into your above paragraphs but still deserve a spot in the press, a common practice is to list them near the bottom of your release. Here’s another example from Magicka: Just be sure not to go overboard — only include things you think your players (or journalists) would find value from. Step 7 (Optional): Technical details. If your game is resource-heavy, it’s a good idea to throw your system requirements here. Step 8: Call to action By now, your potential players have read your release and are pumped to jump into your game. Now they just need to know where to play it. A CTA (call to action) is a short action statement at the bottom of your release that drives traffic to your Steam page or website. Think of it as the “final push” your readers need to take action on your announcement. The key here is to make your CTA actionable. A simple link to your page or a “click here to buy” isn’t enough — you must make it enticing. If you were releasing a VR war game, for instance, you could write something like: Tip: If your Steam store page is super long, consider using a bit.ly link to shorten it up. Step 9: Link to your press kit. If you aren’t already aware, a press kit is: Press kits make it super easy for journalists to grab videos and gifs of your game to use in their articles. I highly suggest checking out the Mortician’s Tale kit on Laundry Bear’s website if you’re making your kit for the first time. It has pretty much everything an effective kit needs, so feel free to copy its base elements. (Thanks again Gabby!) Step 10: Contact information. If a journalist were to reach out to you for more information, where would you send them? It’s usually formatted like so: Name Company Name Phone Number Email This information can go both at the top of the page, as well as near the bottom like on this release (we’ll format this in a second). Step 11: Add the final touches Almost done. Now you just need to add some extra information to make your press release an actual press release: A “FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE” tag with the date of your release. This will go to the right of your contact information. City, state, and location information. This will go directly before your first paragraph. An image, video, or gif showing off your game. This can go directly above or after your headline and subheadline. And BOOM — you‘re done! At the end of the process, your release should look something like this: Although Magicka’s release is really good, there are a few things I’d change about it: There’s no “FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE.” This may confuse journalists. There’s no quote from the developers. This makes it feel impersonal. Their CTA is pretty bad (“Find out more here”). …but other than that, it’s a great reference point you can use when writing your own release. Extras When should you post your release? Sometimes the timing of your release is as simple as “whenever your game is ready.” But other times, especially in Tim Ruswick’s case, putting thought into the timing of your release can be crucial to its success: Keep this in mind with context to your game. Where should you send your release? Most companies simply post their press releases on their website, announce it on social media, put it through a PR distributor like PRNewswire, and wait for journalists to pick it up. But that won’t work for indie devs. When you’re starting out you don’t have enough of a media presence to simply post your press release, and on a tight budget, paying big bucks for PR tools isn’t viable. That means you’ll have to manually send your release to journalists. So before you post your press release, go on some of the popular gaming news sites like Kotaku, Polygon, or PC Gamer and gather a list of journalists (and their emails) who’ve written about games similar to yours. Then, once you’re ready to release, send them an email with a pitch for your story. I just made that process sound way more simple than it actually is, so I recommend using this guide for reaching out to journalists. * * * That’s it! By now, you should have enough information to write effective press releases without having to read another “how to write a press release” post. But here’s the thing: Getting press is only one way to market your game, and by no means is it the end-all-be-all. Continuing your marketing efforts is crucial to your success. That’s why I put together a complete guide on how you can promote your game with Twitch influencers — it covers everything from finding the right influencers, to reaching out, to setting up deals, to verifying content, and much more. You can read that here. Note: This post was originally posted on the author's Medium blog, and is reproduced here with kind permission. Aaron recommends PowerSpike's Game Marketing Advice Newsletter, sent every Monday. [Wayback Machine Archive]
  16. It's been one hectic week. Job searches, contract work researching, phone interviews, resume remakes, documents galore, and listing a whole lot of things that'll cost a whole lot of money over the next year. Current mission status? I'm looking for a publisher to finance the upcoming breakout hit of Yotes Games, LLC. That's right, Yotes Games just became a real-deal company! It's as official as it gets. And it'll make contracts and legal protection a lot less risky for me and a lot more straightforward for anyone I strike a deal with. I made a list of compatible publisher options and I'm pitching the game to them one-by-one. Someone says no, too bad, next in line. I figure out of the 20 of em I narrowed the list down to, one will agree I'm a perfect fit and give Battle Gem Ponies the budget needed to carry on to Launch Day!Get yourself a whole buncha hoopla and gamedev news now!
  17. I am a few weeks into making my first "real" game and want to take it somewhat seriously. It'll be a single player top-down dungeon crawler RPG for PC. At what stage should I start marketing? From observation, sales benefit from building a customer base during development, but starting too early can cause customers to lose interest and showing unfinished assets/ideas can mar reputation. I also have that irrational fear someone's going to steal my ideas if I share them, but I'll get over it. When should you start putting your concept/aesthetic, code snippets, mechanics, gameplay footage, etc out there? Do you share in relation to when your content is presentable or your release schedule? As for where I'm at ~ I am still building the skeleton of my game, so there's lots of features but no substance or levels yet. The art is 100% placeholder. My concept is fleshed out, and I could give an elevator pitch for it. I'm beginning concept art, so I'll also have some aesthetic ready to share soon. I've been keeping a day-by-day journal of my activities and ideas, so I'll have plenty of content to rework into a developer's diary and marketing whenever it's okay to show people. It's probably early, but I want to start planning. Any perspectives are welcome! I'm mostly looking to learn from others' experience.
  18. I got an itchy twitch finger and put up the new Patreon ideas immediately. Still eager for feedback and willing to add any new ideas or mix things around, but I really felt like kicking off August with the new revamp and just having that ready to go as soon as my first couple YouTube videos go up. And new videos will be popping up twice a week at least for the next little while, just to build some momentum. It's all really exciting stuff and I can't wait to see how it grows. Now then... Onto to the devlog!
  19. Originally posted on Medium In April 2018 I received a gift from Google Ads (aka AdWords) — 2000 rubles (~30$) to spend for my Totem Spirits game advertising. In this article I want to share some statistics and overall impressions of this platform. First of all let me tell you that 30$ for advertising is not really ‘a lot of money’ so I didn’t expect it to give the game any significant boost on the market. But the end result was slightly better than I anticipated. While configuring an ad camping I set the budget to ~0.8$\day expecting it to last one and a half months. Actual campaign was active for almost 4 months. As targeting countries I chose the top 5 countries downloading the game: India, Ukraine, Russia, US and Germany. The interface of the Google Ads platform is rather intuitive. I wrote rather since it takes some time to find where to press and what is behind all of those statistics and rates. But I can see its improvement over the old AdWords version. Now it’s time to dive deeper into statistics and numbers. At the next graph we can see the overview of the whole campaign: One point represents stats for the whole week There are two impressions\clicks peaks: week of April 9 and May 7 (I have no clue why). Overall, the campaign is rather linear with ~2500 impressions\~70 clicks per week starting from the peak of May 7 slowly increasing to ~38000 impressions\~500 clicks towards the end. At the next graph we can see the conversion stats: 1$ is roughly 62 rubles at this very moment The cost of one conversion is just 9 cents! Conversion rate is 7.84% which is actually quite high for the industry. Now let’s look into Google Play Console stats: Google Play Console Installs stats As we can see the numbers match: 365 installs with top 18 installs per day several times. Unfortunately, no other relevant statistics can be gathered from Console, since there were no ratings\purchases :( So far the promotion of the game is the hardest part in the whole Game Development process (see my previous article about games promotion for free). And paid advertising seems like a right way to go on. In the end I’d like to quote Mark Twain:
  20. I'm currently working on a POC along with a prototype for my Digital Multimedia Development course. We're talking about crowdsourcing this week, which leaves me with a few questions. How would you sell your idea for a game? I'm sure there are plenty of ways to go about it, but just in a general, step by step fashion, how would you do it? And are there any advantages to crowdsourcing your idea? Crowdsourcing is a pretty new concept for me.
  21. OK.ru, one of Russia’s largest social networks, has tripled mobile game developer payouts to $1.6 mln (100 mln rubles) over the past five months. In a move to lure more developers from all over the world, OK.ru will give free traffic to new HTML5 games starting from July 1, 2018. There are a lot of opportunities for HTML5 developers in OK as it’s a relatively new platform and a low-competition niche in the social network. That said, the new games can quickly earn revenues and ramp up user base. In May 2018, 50% of payouts in OK were passed to top-5 games. The increase in developer payouts was caused by OK’s growing number of mobile users, higher penetration of broadband connectivity and the emergence of new mobile technologies that allow to launch any game inside a mobile web browser. That resulted in doubling the number of daily game launches on OK mobile platform to 350 mln. OK has 71 million monthly users. The social network allows users to watch streams in UltraHD, listen to music, buy goods and services inside the network and transfer money to 18 countries. OK is a part of Mail.Ru Group, the largest IT holding company in Eastern Europe.
  22. OK.ru, one of Russia’s largest social networks, has tripled mobile game developer payouts to $1.6 mln (100 mln rubles) over the past five months. In a move to lure more developers from all over the world, OK.ru will give free traffic to new HTML5 games starting from July 1, 2018. There are a lot of opportunities for HTML5 developers in OK as it’s a relatively new platform and a low-competition niche in the social network. That said, the new games can quickly earn revenues and ramp up user base. In May 2018, 50% of payouts in OK were passed to top-5 games. The increase in developer payouts was caused by OK’s growing number of mobile users, higher penetration of broadband connectivity and the emergence of new mobile technologies that allow to launch any game inside a mobile web browser. That resulted in doubling the number of daily game launches on OK mobile platform to 350 mln. OK has 71 million monthly users. The social network allows users to watch streams in UltraHD, listen to music, buy goods and services inside the network and transfer money to 18 countries. OK is a part of Mail.Ru Group, the largest IT holding company in Eastern Europe. View full story
  23. Starting to build out all the actual tile maps to be used in the beginning segment of the game, up to the first badge and a little beyond, just to get players hooked and hungry for more. Now, while the completed Alpha won't be a thing until the entire game is playable start to finish, I do believe I can get the first part of the game out within the month of July. While everyone is enjoying the new story, learning the mechanics, interacting with the world, and getting that first badge, I'll be working on getting the demo in as many Let's Player's hands as possible by day and implementing the rest of the design notes by night. Time to put everything I've got into a super-polished build that'll make people go nuts when they try it. Time to make sure every 30 seconds of the game gives players a Ben & Jerry's sized chunk of fun to chew on. Time to get Battle Gem Ponies on the map! Read More: yotesgames.com
  24. DreamHack Activities

    DreamHack Atlanta

    until
    DreamHack Atlanta Atlanta, Georgia 16 November – 18 November We're expanding our DreamHack events to encompass a "Gaming Lifestyle" approach. So basically we're bringing a ton of new content to the already massive show that focuses on Indies, Tabletop, Films, Students, Art, and more. Of course this means we're making everything we're already doing even bigger and more awesome such as Esports, LAN, Music, Expo, and pretty much everything else. CALL FOR ENTRIES: The Top 3 Activities Indies Should Apply For... 1. Indie Playground: The Indie Playground is a curated area where games entered into our competition before the event have a chance to win a complimentary booth to showcase their game. The selected games are organized into 12 genre categories that are reflected in the layout of the Indie Playground. Multiple titles are selected for each genre ensuring attendees will enjoy as many indie titles as possible. It's free to enter and those selected will score a FREE 10'x10' booth. We're pretty flexible on what you can send us. If you're not finished with your game yet you can definitely still submit. We've judged and accepted tons of unfinished video games, tabletop, etc. before. Entry form....https://tinyurl.com/DH-IndiePlayground Deadline: Friday, September 28th, 2018 2. Game Pitch Championship: The Game Pitch Championship was created to help build the skills you need to successfully get your product out there. Many developers are talented and either nail the build they have to show but don’t really nail the business plan or they nail the business plan and not the build. With a pitch, you have a short time to impress so you need to nail it all. This competition will not only help hone your skills with industry vets guiding your progress through the competition, but you’ll win accolades too. You could also win $2,500! Entry Form....https://tinyurl.com/DH-GamePitchChamp Prize: $2,500 USD Deadline: Friday, September 28th, 2018 3. Art Gallery: Exactly as it sounds, our gallery showcases some of the most amazing artists in video games, tabletop, comics, anime, and more. DreamHack staff select a number of works then we just print cool art on canvas for FREE—your game gets a slice of advertising while our fans enjoy a non-TV wall on the expo floor. It doesn't even require you to be onsite for the event, so this one should be a no-brainer. Entry Form....https://tinyurl.com/DH-GameArtGallery Deadline: Friday, September 28th, 2018 Good luck!! Reach out to sydney.mantrom@dreamhack.com for questions about the forms.
  25. DreamHack Activities

    DreamHack Winter

    until
    DreamHack Winter Jönköping, Sweden 30 November – 3 December We're expanding our DreamHack events to encompass a "Gaming Lifestyle" approach. So basically we're bringing a ton of new content to the already massive show that focuses on Indies, Tabletop, Films, Students, Art, and more. Of course this means we're making everything we're already doing even bigger and more awesome such as Esports, LAN, Music, Expo, and pretty much everything else. CALL FOR ENTRIES: The New Indie Activities we're adding to our Sweden Event.... Indie Playground: The Indie Playground is a curated area where games entered into our competition before the event have a chance to win a complimentary booth to showcase their game. The selected games are organized into 12 genre categories that are reflected in the layout of the Indie Playground. Multiple titles are selected for each genre ensuring attendees will enjoy as many indie titles as possible. It's free to enter and those selected will score a FREE 10'x10' booth. We're pretty flexible on what you can send us. If you're not finished with your game yet you can definitely still submit. We've judged and accepted tons of unfinished video games, tabletop, etc. before. Entry form....https://tinyurl.com/DH-IndiePlayground Deadline: Friday, September 28th, 2018 Art Gallery: Exactly as it sounds, our gallery showcases some of the most amazing artists in video games, tabletop, comics, anime, and more. DreamHack staff select a number of works then we just print cool art on canvas for FREE—your game gets a slice of advertising while our fans enjoy a non-TV wall on the expo floor. It doesn't even require you to be onsite for the event, so this one should be a no-brainer. Entry Form....https://tinyurl.com/DH-GameArtGallery Deadline: Friday, September 28th, 2018 Good luck!! Reach out to sydney.mantrom@dreamhack.com for questions about the forms.
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