Jump to content
  • Advertisement

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Mobile'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Categories

  • Audio
    • Music and Sound FX
  • Business
    • Business and Law
    • Career Development
    • Production and Management
  • Game Design
    • Game Design and Theory
    • Writing for Games
    • UX for Games
  • Industry
    • Interviews
    • Event Coverage
  • Programming
    • Artificial Intelligence
    • General and Gameplay Programming
    • Graphics and GPU Programming
    • Engines and Middleware
    • Math and Physics
    • Networking and Multiplayer
  • Visual Arts
  • Archive

Categories

  • Audio
  • Visual Arts
  • Programming
  • Writing

Categories

  • Game Dev Loadout
  • Game Dev Unchained

Categories

  • Game Developers Conference
    • GDC 2017
    • GDC 2018
  • Power-Up Digital Games Conference
    • PDGC I: Words of Wisdom
    • PDGC II: The Devs Strike Back
    • PDGC III: Syntax Error

Forums

  • Audio
    • Music and Sound FX
  • Business
    • Games Career Development
    • Production and Management
    • Games Business and Law
  • Game Design
    • Game Design and Theory
    • Writing for Games
  • Programming
    • Artificial Intelligence
    • Engines and Middleware
    • General and Gameplay Programming
    • Graphics and GPU Programming
    • Math and Physics
    • Networking and Multiplayer
  • Visual Arts
    • 2D and 3D Art
    • Art Critique and Feedback
  • Community
    • GameDev Challenges
    • GDNet+ Member Forum
    • GDNet Lounge
    • GDNet Comments, Suggestions, and Ideas
    • Coding Horrors
    • Your Announcements
    • Hobby Project Classifieds
    • Indie Showcase
    • Article Writing
  • Affiliates
    • NeHe Productions
    • AngelCode
  • Topical
    • Virtual and Augmented Reality
    • News
  • Workshops
    • C# Workshop
    • CPP Workshop
    • Freehand Drawing Workshop
    • Hands-On Interactive Game Development
    • SICP Workshop
    • XNA 4.0 Workshop
  • Archive
    • Topical
    • Affiliates
    • Contests
    • Technical
  • GameDev Challenges's Topics
  • For Beginners's Forum
  • Unreal Engine Users's Unreal Engine Group Forum
  • Unity Developers's Forum
  • Unity Developers's Asset Share

Calendars

  • Community Calendar
  • Games Industry Events
  • Game Jams
  • GameDev Challenges's Schedule

Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.

Product Groups

  • Advertisements
  • GameDev Gear

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


About Me


Website


Role


Twitter


Github


Twitch


Steam

Found 1115 results

  1. When we have an open world MMO, it’s crucial to be on top of its virtual game economy. It’s human nature to try to exploit the system, and your players will test the limits that you build for your world. The sigmoid (also known as the logistic function) is an ally when it comes to balancing our games, especially when preventing players from engaging in behaviors that will harm the game economy. The target audience for this is product people and game designers who sometimes feel that they lack the mathematical tools they need to implement their vision. Why should we use this mathematical tool to balance the rewards given each level in a game economy? By balancing our games with the logistic function we achieve these two effects: Discourage grinding or engaging with content from a much lower level. Reward players for taking on harder challenges, eg. give better rewards for taking on a boss a few levels higher. Logistic Function to the Rescue! The sigmoid or logistic function looks like the chart below. The sigmoid has this characteristic shape. The mathematical formula for the logistic function is: Where is the maximum value that the function will reach. Is the rate of growth of the function. The lower the rate of growth is, the slower the function will converge to . is the value at which the function will reach half . If you want to simulate this function on excel, you can use the following formula: Define game rewards based on the difficulty of a challenge The next step is to use this function to achieve the two goals we defined previously: To prevent players from getting rewards from mobs/ bosses/monsters at a much lower level than their player level. To reward those who take on more difficult challenges. The difference between the mob/monster level and the player level will be our x, which we’ll use to determine rewards based on the difficulty of the encounter Simulation of 3 scenarios for a game reward.In the image above, we use a spreadsheet program to simulate our reward function using different parameters: Scenario 1 (blue), Scenario 2 (red), Scenario 3 (yellow). Then, it’s time to plot the results. We do this so that we can see the shape of the curves and reason about them. Scenario 3 shows a function where the maximum reward is 15. Scenario 2 converges to its top reward the quickest, even though it has a slow start. There are a lot of possibilities where the use of this function combined with some creativity can help solve in-game challenges. There’s a lot more that can be said about this function. As a tease, this function has a close relationship with the gaussian function better known by its bell curve and the normal probability distribution. Additional resources: Feel free to make a copy of my simulation spreadsheet: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1UMkbq6ItposrehjqugMFsoH9i-ZVRXnkib9F6Rckpm0/edit?usp=sharing All about the logistic function, on Wolfram Alpha: https://www.wolframalpha.com/input/?i=logistic%20function Wikipedia page on logistic function: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Logistic_function PS – Would you like to see more articles about this topic let me know in the comments below. If you would like me to do a workshop or a talk at your organization get in touch. The post Balancing Grinding Below the Level Curve on an Open World – MMO Virtual Economy appeared first on Daantje on Data. View the full article
  2. Hello, I apologise in advanced I'm not really good in English. I'm just new here and I don't know how to start. I'm a fourth year IT student and want to make my favorite old game into mobile game. The game I want to create is base from mmorpg Ran Online which was shutdown 3 months ago. I deeply in love with this game and I want to make it into mobile but I have no idea where to start. I heard about how to reverse engineer the game and create it by using Unity software. I also try to read other forums regarding about making mmorpg in mobile but they just gave me a vague general answer. Please help me I want to know where I should start in this project. I really want this game in my pocket and to be back. I'm not that good but I have knowledge in Java and C++. Any help will be much appreciated.
  3. Daantje

    Just make game

    Making good games is hard. Making games that yield a profit is even harder. In the mobile F2P industry, we hear about KPIs ad nauseam. The mobile industry has refined the art of game making by embracing its love with data. Data analysis is an inherent part of mobile F2P in 2019. Otherwise, how can you justify an upfront investment of months of highly skilled labor to produce a product that you’re going to give away for free and expect players to be interested in paying in order to augment their experience? How can you justify paying for users to install and interact with your game? Studying the market, looking at game data are intrinsic parts of the creation and refinement of these products. But what if the pursue of blind data-driven optimization can also hurt the games? KPIs: a measure not the strategy KPIs are the bread and butter of F2P. These metrics will tell you insightful things about your game. For example, how well it monetizes, how long players keep playing, etc. Metrics like Retention, ARPDAU, MAU, DAU, and WAU become part of our vocabulary. And we start gaining intuition about the state of a product at a certain time. These metrics are proxies, and they won’t tell you how good a game is, or whether it is fun. We can talk about engagement. Nowadays, engagement is confused with attention. We can shoot fireworks to keep people interested and occupied for a while. However, if they’re not feeling that what they’re doing is worthwhile they will eventually leave. Are you distracting or enriching?The traditional KPIs might make you keep you pulling white rabbits out of hats distracting your player base. Although, sometimes a deeper dive into the psyche of the player might enable us to build what that player needs. Due diligence Before committing the resources, we need to understand why/what/how/when the game is going to be made. Taking the time to prototype and explore at the beginning of a project might look like a waste of resources. However, insights learned early are cheaper in terms of project cost. When the team can identify budget issues early in the design process, cost estimates are more thorough, eliminating threats from potential, costly surprises. Risk Mitigation Strategies in Innovative Projects Due diligence is the process where all the disciplines involved with the production take a step back and highlight risks. Research on how to mitigate those risks. This might mean creating a tech demo of how the server technology is going to work, and how to scale it to fulfill the game requirements. Figuring out the technical challenges early on is betterFor the art team, this might mean to align with marketing and understand the impact of the art style, genre, characters on the marketability of the game. Are there any opportunities in the market? Pausing the development at certain stages (and having the patience needed to let an idea mature), might be a good option. Patience and timing should be mentioned more often. However, game development is a marathon, not a sprint and fortune favors those who mitigate the risk. Just make game If there would be an infallible formula for making a great game we would all be following it. It’s ironic that an industry that is so data-driven has to take these leaps of faith. It’s even more ironic the amount of faith that we put on teams with a track record (think Kojima, Warren Spector). Focus on adding value to the player. Understanding why we’re making what we set out to do and invest early on mitigating risks is my preferred approach. But in the end, when push comes to shove, it all comes down to just make game. Make it the best you can while at it, please. The post Just make game appeared first on Daantje on Data. View the full article
  4. We all know that inflation in a game economy can cause a lot of problems. Among which: Decreased need to spend money on in-app purchases to obtain game items/currency Increased difficulty for new players to be able to compete with older players Lack of feeling of meaningful progression Overall spender demotivation This video from Extra Credits is a great resource on inflation and Power Creep This article is aimed at giving product people the tools needed to monitor inflation, deflation, and equilibria in their games. High-level tutorial on monitoring game economy inflation It all starts with good analytics tracking of game metrics. https://andersdrachen.files.wordpress.com/2013/07/02drachenetal02.pdf In order to monitor inflation, we start by listing the game currencies and items that players can accumulate, for example: Gems (hard currency) Fairy Dust (soft currency) We gather these metrics on a database maybe with a structure similar to the one below. playerID current_gems current_fairydust gametimestamp lala123 1045 2000 11/10/2019 21:53:36 vivi456 24 34 11/10/2019 21:54:36 lala123 500 2000 11/10/2019 21:55:36 The next step is to gather the data in order to analyze inflation. For this step, we query the database where the player data is stored and aggregate the minimum number of gems (or other currency), that the player held during the day. This number gives us a baseline for the lowest amount that the account saw that day. After we aggregate that minimum amount per player per day, it’s time to see what is the average minimum number of gems for that day. The SQL code snippet below can give us an idea of how to accomplish that task. with pre_select as ( SELECT DATE_TRUNC('day', gametimestamp) as day, playerID, MIN(current_gems) as gems, MIN(current_fairydust) as fairydust FROM game_table GROUP BY 1, 2 ) SELECT day, AVG(gems) min_gem_inventory, AVG(fairydust) min_fairydust FROM pre_select GROUP BY 1 ORDER BY 1 After we query our data, the simplest method for product people is to get a CSV and import it to a spreadsheet, like on the sample below. day min_gem_inventory min_gem_inventory_serie1 min_gem_inventory_serie2 01/01/2020 23 23 02/01/2020 10 10 03/01/2020 34 34 04/01/2020 36 36 05/01/2020 57 57 06/01/2020 100 100 07/01/2020 250 250 08/01/2020 245 245 09/01/2020 100 100 10/01/2020 400 400 11/01/2020 500 500 12/01/2020 1000 1000 After getting the data on a table like the one above the next step is to plot a chart of the currency vs. the day. So, on the x-axis, we plot the day or the time series and on the y-axis our variable that we want to monitor. We start by plotting the min_gem_inventory with a blue line. We can see that there seem to be two different periods with the naked eye. At first, we see slow growth until the 7th. Then, a rapid growth period ensues. If this would be real data, probably around the 8th we introduced an update that affected the number of resources that players could get. Given these two different periods, we plot 2 new series with the days where we see the different behaviors (red and yellow data). From here, we add a trendline with the linear option. This trendline will create a linear regression of the type y = a x + b . The a coefficient indicates the slope, the greater the number the higher the inflation. The a coefitient also gives us the inflation rate. In our example, during the red period, the players’ gem inventory expands at an average rate of 1.04 gems per day, after the game update that value changed to 6.25 gems per day. Analysis If we’re able to track the evolution of the players’ wallets over time, then with simple linear regressions, we’re able to draw a lot of conclusions about the game economy. If the slope of the linear trend line is greater than 0, then, we have some inflation. If the line moves mostly sideways, there’s an equilibrium. Game economies are dynamic. Often, there’s a need to correlate progression with access to resources. Therefore, equilibria are rare in games. When the slope goes down, there’s a deflationary period. Good games can find ways of mitigating inflation by adopting strategies that introduce sinks for currencies (places where players spend currencies and make them disappear from the game economy). PS – This is a high-level article. If you like the way that I approach these subjects, feel free to comment and get in touch. If you have any ideas of topics that you would like to see covered, let me know. I could spend a whole day just talking about empowering game dev teams with data-driven insights non-stop. All the best, Daniela. The post Monitoring game economy inflation for product people – Data-Driven Product Management appeared first on Daantje on Data. View the full article
  5. Hey everyone! I'm currently working on Spin! Plus. It will have more and improved features and also 25 more levels. For now, I've made a new color pallet. What do you think?
  6. Most people don’t think there are any games other than clickers or auto-play games on mobile. They would be wrong. It can be hard to find them, but there are actual skill-based games available. There aren’t many devs out there who would be brave enough to make a Souls-like on mobile, but fortunately for those of us who zone onto Souls-like games like Artorias’s hitbox zones into us, there is a studio that has done just that. It takes a certain type of crazy to invite comparisons to games like Let It Die or Dark Souls, but Latersoft took that challenge and has come out the other side with a respectable, stamina management, whiff punishing action game for your phone. Dark Prison is a third-person action RPG that is available for both Apple and Android devices. It’s a highly addictive Souls-like and has great reviews. The premise is pretty straightforward. You are the parent of a precocious little girl. A deadly virus has decimated the population and it just so happens that your kid has an immunity. Obviously, she needs to get kidnapped. A dangerous mercenary group called “The Apostles” have snatched her. As the parent of the year nominee that you are, you head to rescue your child from these mercenaries. There are also other survivors that you can rescue for more resources to use in your quest to save your child. Fight through the hordes of intelligent enemies, zombies, and massive boss monsters. If you are worried that you won’t be able to dodge roll around the bad guys and mess them up, the game is compatible with Xbox and PS4 controllers. The graphics are top-notch, even for a mobile, and they take advantage of their art style by giving you in-depth character creation. There’s also a giant loot pool for you to enjoy, much like Let It Die. Take your fashion Souls to the next level on your phone. Design your ultimate Souls-like original character, and load them up with epic gear. Take on the bosses in your fly clothes. Engage in PvP and flex on your enemies with your fly threads. There is a thing that all Souls-like games need, and if you don’t nail it, your Souls-like card gets revoked. Dark Prison has its card laminated and safely stored in their filing cabinet. The AI is going to give you no quarter, so be ready to bring your A-game. The bosses aren’t going to play around with you either, so get ready to “get gud” or be prepared to be turned into a red smear in the boss arena. If you don’t feel the PVE you can also drop into PVP sessions to see if you have what it takes to battle a human opponent. If you’re tired of match 3 games, tower defense games, base building games or mindless autoplay games, check out Dark Prison. It will keep you engaged with its skill-based gameplay. The story and dialogue are delightfully camp and will keep you coming back. There are tons of places in Dark Prison to explore, so grinding for good gear won’t become boring. No matter what device you rock, you’ll be able to pick up this title for free. Check it out on the Google Play Store, or the App Store. You won’t regret it. App Store: https://apps.apple.com/us/app/breakout-dark-prison-rescue/id1463530896 Google Play: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.latersoft.darkprison
  7. I want to make a board game which looks like clash of clans, this is fourth shot for making any game, all the games that I have tried till now are third-person shooter game, every time I have completed level design and character designs but at the end project turns big and I end up with the overwhelming feeling and I give up this time I have decided to start with some small board game with low poly art style, some of the requirements and software I know are mentioned below please suggest how should i proceed.Things I know;-UE4 (level design, not that good but above-average knowledge of Blueprints)-Cryengine-Maya-All the designing software available- no knowledge of musicThings I am not sure of;-Which game engine will be best for this stylized board game-Which game engine market has better low poly asset packs (and also cheaper, because I am not in a great financial condition as of now)-Is there a tutorial or blog I can refer to if someone else had a similar queryLet me know if there's anything else worth mentioning or anything that I have mentioned is confusing or contains less information required for answering this question.Lots of love to the community
  8. Hi there, my name is Sean, or Ranen on the interwebs. I'm a 25 years old teacher dude in EST and I've been working on free, hobbyist game-dev in varying capacities and roles for over a decade, including stops and breaks along the way. I have finally had enough with working alone as I've discovered the motivation power of having a team to help drive creativity. In hopes of branching out and meeting others to work with, I write this post! I have had experience with GMS 1.4, minimal experience so far with GMS2, a good bit of experience with bitsy, some experience with old Multimedia Fusion and minimal experience with the current version. I have learned spotty versions of several coding languages (HTML, CSS, Java [not javascript yet], GML), some recent modelling in Blender, lots of work with Aseprite and several audio software. It is with this that I reiterate: I am a generalist, jack of all trades and standardly proficient in none. With this in mind, I am however very good and quick with learning, am very resourceful, and can prove it with a number of projects. My publicly available, finished game projects on itch.io include a bitsy poem, a full bitsy adventure into my first year of teaching (with contracted music and boiling over with genuine dialogue), and a game that I created in a month in GMS 1.4 that I am pretty proud of (despite the royalty free music) named Jupe on a Goop. https://ranen.itch.io/ I would love to make some sort of 2D game, made with love but no need for incredibly complex systems... I want to make something fun. Even if it is just a prototype, just to get used to working with someone new. VN? Platformer? LoZ:LTTP-like? Point-n-click? No preference! Let me know if you are interested and what you have in mind, I'd love to hear your ideas. Send me a bit of work you've done while you're at it (nothing substantial required, just something so I know who I'm working with!). Thanks for reading!