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Found 65 results

  1. I've been looking into server hosting for the game server, and since Windows Server does cost a bit to lease and also fires up a bunch of services that I don't need at all I've been looking into Linux. The server is written in C# and previously Mono was the only realistic alternative for Linux - but it had a reputation for very bad performance in many cases. .Net Core 1.x was way too restricted feature-wise, but with .Net core 2.x the tables have turned. So last day I embarked on a mission to port my entire codebase - except for some Windows Forms test projects - into .Net Standard, and created a .Net Core console project to start the service. This turned out to be totally painless. I wasn't using any functionality that wasn't part of .Net Standard 2.x so it simply just worked. The next step was to run this on Linux. I have very little experience with Linux but Google works well for most things so I set up a Centos 7 VM in Hyper-V and went to work. The installation did take a few tries and I had to battle a few permission problems when following a guide on installing .Net Core on Centos but they weren't a big hurdle. Of course when I managed to start the program it crashes immediately, and I found some issues with path names - backslashes and case-sensitivity - when loading game data. These were also fixed pretty easily and soon the server was running. I couldn't connect to it though from the host system, but this was a simple matter of opening a port in the firewall. So far I'm already becoming a Linux fan at least when it comes to servers. Running a box without any graphical user interface is in some ways easier. Everything is a file and everything you can do can be done with a command. On Windows most things you do when managing a server consist of a complex series of clicking this and that button or file icon, filling out textfields etc. etc. and is hard to document (I'm sure you can also do most things with CMD and Powershell of course) On Linux it might take some time to research how to do even the simplest thing for a newbie such as myself, but every command needed can simply be stored in a text-file, so that I can easily set up a new server from scratch. And this file can easily be updated - and reviewed by a Linux expert for troubleshooting.
  2. There had to be a way to manage cool screen transitions as easy as possible in C++ without too much difficulty. There wasn't until now Swoosh, the mini library that immediately adds 100x polish to your game. Fork the project at https://github.com/TheMaverickProgrammer/Swoosh. LICENSED under zlib/libpng License . Swoosh is easy to integrate and makes your game look pro. Just checkout the super simple game example that ships with it. The library is header only and open source. See the full video https://streamable.com/qb023. The example project comes with 4 header-only custom segue effects you can copy and paste directly into your project and it'll just work. That simple. That powerful. Using segues is as easy as calling push or pop and providing the intent. The intent is a specialized nested class designed to be human readable. Just see for yourself: ActivityController controller; controller.push<MainMenuScene>(); ... // User selects settings using intent::segue; controller.push<segue<SlideInLeft>::to<AppSettingsScene>>(); Popping is the same way. controller.queuePop(); controller.queuePop<segue<SlideIn>>(); And if you're making a legend of zelda clone and the player teleports out of a series of deep dungeons back to overworld... there's a function for that too bool found = controller.queueRewind<segue<SlideIn>::to<LOZOverworld>>(); if(!found) { // Perhaps we're already in overworld. Certain teleport items cannot be used! } Take a peak at the full source code for the demo project: https://github.com/TheMaverickProgrammer/Swoosh/tree/master/ExampleDemo/Swoosh Swoosh comes with other useful utilities specifically but not limited to games. function bool doesCollide(a, b) function double angleTo(subject, target) function vector2 direction(target, dest) And more... See the rest here: https://github.com/TheMaverickProgrammer/Swoosh/wiki/Namespaces
  3. I am planning to use some third party libraries, more specifically FreeImage, and in the Download page there is a Disclaimer: http://freeimage.sourceforge.net/download.html Basically it displays the licenses and the copyright owners of the libraries included within FreeImage. I know I have to display FreeImage's license at some point in my game, but do I have to display all of those licenses from the libraries contained within FreeImage itself?
  4. I have prepared a video tutorial that explains how you can make a game in 5 minutes with LGCK builder. This small video is a quick introduction to use this amazing tool that can be used to make any kind of 2D games. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lN3gkZWr-PM&t=2s Okay, You have watched the video and still have questions. Maybe you want to create a top down 2D map. There is an option to disable gravity on each given level. You simply right-click your level in the Toolbox and select Edit Level. On the Advanced tab, there is a no gravity checkbox. There are two main requirements for a given level to work. First, you must include a Player Sprite. This is easily solved by creating it with the Sprite Wizard and drag & dropping your player into your newly created level. Second, you need at least one goal. The easiest way to solve that problem is use the Sprite Wizard and select Object as the sprite type. There is a checkbox called Automatic goal that you can check and this will mark any instance of this sprite as an objective going toward the completion of the level. Objects die when they are touched by the player and you can set several options including points, health rewards and sound to play by right clicking your object and selecting Edit Sprite. If you didn't check automatic goal, you can always right click on any of those Sprites on your level and select Customize in the context menu. Once you are in the property box just check the attribute Goal. If you don't have sprites of your own, LGCK builder comes with some sprites in the tutorial folder. It also comes with a sample demo game that highlight some of the engine capabilities and how to use the event model to do some neat tricks (like breakable bridges, animated lava, or squares that change colors when you step on them etc.). You can find more sprites and sounds here: https://sourceforge.net/projects/lgck/files/Resources/ Please note that many of the sprites you can find on the web come in the form of sprite sheets. LGCK builder can import most of them with minimal intervention. Go to File, Import, Import Images. Click the + button to add a new png file. Once the sprite sheet is in the box, right click on it and select Split image from the context menu. You'll be given the choice of picking the right tile size (16x16, 24x24, 32x32 etc.). If you need to edit this image set further, LGCK builder IDE comes with it's own Sprite Editor. You can download LGCK builder from freewarefiles: https://www.freewarefiles.com/Lgck-Builder-Game-Construction-Kit-_program_112323.html You can find more information at the official site: https://cfrankb.com/lgck
  5. I have prepared a video tutorial that explains how you can make a game in 5 minutes with LGCK builder. This small video is a quick introduction to use this amazing tool that can be used to make any kind of 2D games. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lN3gkZWr-PM&t=2s Okay, You have watched the video and still have questions. Maybe you want to create a top down 2D map. There is an option to disable gravity on each given level. You simply right-click your level in the Toolbox and select Edit Level. On the Advanced tab, there is a no gravity checkbox. There are two main requirements for a given level to work. First, you must include a Player Sprite. This is easily solved by creating it with the Sprite Wizard and drag & dropping your player into your newly created level. Second, you need at least one goal. The easiest way to solve that problem is use the Sprite Wizard and select Object as the sprite type. There is a checkbox called Automatic goal that you can check and this will mark any instance of this sprite as an objective going toward the completion of the level. Objects die when they are touched by the player and you can set several options including points, health rewards and sound to play by right clicking your object and selecting Edit Sprite. If you didn't check automatic goal, you can always right click on any of those Sprites on your level and select Customize in the context menu. Once you are in the property box just check the attribute Goal. If you don't have sprites of your own, LGCK builder comes with some sprites in the tutorial folder. It also comes with a sample demo game that highlight some of the engine capabilities and how to use the event model to do some neat tricks (like breakable bridges, animated lava, or squares that change colors when you step on them etc.). You can find more sprites and sounds here: https://sourceforge.net/projects/lgck/files/Resources/ Please note that many of the sprites you can find on the web come in the form of sprite sheets. LGCK builder can import most of them with minimal intervention. Go to File, Import, Import Images. Click the + button to add a new png file. Once the sprite sheet is in the box, right click on it and select Split image from the context menu. You'll be given the choice of picking the right tile size (16x16, 24x24, 32x32 etc.). If you need to edit this image set further, LGCK builder IDE comes with it's own Sprite Editor. You can download LGCK builder from freewarefiles: https://www.freewarefiles.com/Lgck-Builder-Game-Construction-Kit-_program_112323.html You can find more information at the official site: https://cfrankb.com/lgck View full story
  6. Mobile phones are now a collective entity and have made life very easy. Even a decade back you could not imagine doing all the things that your mobile phone can do today. The amazing thing is that it does not just stop there. There is so much more that is still in process, and there is no stopping this innovation. The Role Of Mobile Applications in The Mobile Industry A significant reason for all of this innovation is the competition in the market. The rivalry among competitors makes them go to great lengths to bring out better and better ideas and one of the ways that they do. This is through Mobile applications, which may be already installed/built into your phone or you may have to install them. Every year billions of mobile apps are downloaded from play stores, and statistics suggest that this trend will continue to get stronger and stronger. This means that the demand for people who can handle the app development process is, and will continue to be, on the rise. We call these people Mobile Application Developers. Tricks for Mobile Application Developers If you are one of these mobile application developers, you would know that no matter how daunting the app development process looks, the necessary steps stay the same. Still, to help you get more out of your Mobile App Development, here are some tricks: 1. Market Research: Although the idea of research might seem intimidating to most developers, it is the most critical part of your process. Without market research, even if you do develop an app, its success will not be guaranteed. Moreover, the reason for market research is not just to identify the needs of the market, but also the trends in it. So, the entire purpose of market research is not to sell the product, but also to identify how to go about making it. 2. Programming Languages: The most basic, yet pivotal decision that you will take when developing a Mobile Application is the choice of programming language. Now, every language has its specific syntax and commands, so you have to make sure that you are well versed in the language you pick. Some of the most common languages used for mobile app development are Swift, C++, C#, Java and HTML 5. 3. Testing Frequently: This one trick might seem very unnecessary, but there are a lot of benefits that you can gain from testing your app frequently. You can catch bugs early in the development process, so later you do not have to alter the entire code. Moreover, testing often leads to new ideas, and if the notion strikes you before the app is entirely developed, it will be much more comfortable to implement it. 4. Do not Forget the Target Audience: Keeping the app as relevant as possible to the target audience is a sure ingredient for success. You must always have the target audience at the back of your mind while developing the app. 5. Marketing: You will also need to invest time in devising a marketing a strategy to sell your app once it is made. It is necessary that you acquaint yourself with marketing strategies if you want to get the most out of your mobile development.
  7. BenchmarkNet is a console application for testing the reliable UDP networking solutions. Features: Asynchronous simulation of a large number of clients Stable under high loads Simple and flexible simulation setup Detailed session information Multi-process instances Supported networking libraries: ENet UNet LiteNetLib Lidgren MiniUDP Hazel Photon Neutrino DarkRift More information and source code on GitHub. You can find the latest benchmark results on the wiki page.
  8. Hello all, I was not sure where to place this so I decided to place this in the general forum. Please note, that I have not developed anything at this time. I am currently doing some research and scouting. I have been considering to develop a game controller. I was thinking that it would be nice if the controller registered as a Xbox 360 controller when connected to a windows PC. I could go out and get an actual 360 controller but I am redesigning the case and the electronics. So, I was thinking about utilizing the XUSB protocol. After doing some research, it appears that I am not able to find information regarding this protocol. I am starting to have concerns that the XUSB is proprietary to Microsoft. Is this the case? Are approved Microsoft accessories only allowed to use the XUSB? If so, then how do I become "approved" so that I can develop XUSB controllers? If this is not the case, then where would I be able to find documentation on XUSB communications?Or would i be able to use a USB Sniffer and basically reverse engineer the communications protocol between the controller and the PC? Note: Yes, I am aware that windows supports the DirectInput method. This is my fall back in the event that I can't get the XUSB protocol to move forward. Thank you
  9. Effekseer Project develops "Effekseer," which is visual software for creating open source games; on September 13, I released "Effekseer 1.4," which is the latest major version release. Effekseer is a tool to create various visual effects used in games and others. With Effekseer, you can easily create various visual effects such as explosion, light emission, and particle simply by specifying different parameters. Effekseer's effect creation tool works on Windows and macOS. The created visual effects can be viewed on Windows, macOS, Linux, iOS, Android and other environments with DirectX, OpenGL and so on. In addition, there are plugins / libraries for game engines such as Unity and UnrealEngine4 to view visual effects. Effekseer 1.4 is an updated version of Effekseer 1.3 released in November 2017. This update contains the following changes: The renewal of UI. Support the tool for macOS. Addition of a function to read FBX with animation. Addition of parameters to protect collied effects and objects. Addition of parameters for easier control of the effects. In addtion I improve plugins/libraries for Unity, UnrealEngine4 and Cocos2d-x. Besides that, more than 40 new sample effects have been added and many bugs have been fixed. Effekseer 1.4 is available on the project website. The license for the software is the MIT license. Effekseer http://effekseer.github.io/ Github https://github.com/effekseer/Effekseer  Sample Effects. Tool Demo
  10. Effekseer Project develops "Effekseer," which is visual software for creating open source games; on September 13, I released "Effekseer 1.4," which is the latest major version release. Effekseer is a tool to create various visual effects used in games and others. With Effekseer, you can easily create various visual effects such as explosion, light emission, and particle simply by specifying different parameters. Effekseer's effect creation tool works on Windows and macOS. The created visual effects can be viewed on Windows, macOS, Linux, iOS, Android and other environments with DirectX, OpenGL and so on. In addition, there are plugins / libraries for game engines such as Unity and UnrealEngine4 to view visual effects. Effekseer 1.4 is an updated version of Effekseer 1.3 released in November 2017. This update contains the following changes: The renewal of UI. Support the tool for macOS. Addition of a function to read FBX with animation. Addition of parameters to protect collied effects and objects. Addition of parameters for easier control of the effects. In addtion I improve plugins/libraries for Unity, UnrealEngine4 and Cocos2d-x. Besides that, more than 40 new sample effects have been added and many bugs have been fixed. Effekseer 1.4 is available on the project website. The license for the software is the MIT license. Effekseer http://effekseer.github.io/ Github https://github.com/effekseer/Effekseer  Sample Effects. Tool Demo View full story
  11. I am just looking to play around, and I would like to work on an android game in the same spirit as the old school Bard's Tale... the 8 bit 3d first person game from the 80's, not the recent top down 3d iso view remake. What I am looking for is a starting point so I am not trying to reinvent the wheel. Ideally, the map would be X by Y with each space being a wall, door, etc, and the player moves through the "dungeon" or "town" step by step (not free moving, like Doom or Wolfenstein). The "wall" or whatever would be a flat image that gets painted onto that area, I would need different "wall" tiles for things like a true wall, door, or shop fronts for city elements. I have seen a few which are free moving, that I could probably adjust to "step by step" movement. The thing that seems to be missing is different floor tiles, and (optionally) ceiling tiles, which could also be "open sky" if you are in city mode... I am more interested in the actual gameplay, the combat and such, so I was hoping to find a project that started off along these lines where I can adapt the code to what i am looking for without having to make a complete 3d type engine, and I don't want to use one of the current 3d packages because they are a little overkill for what I am trying to do... any pointers on this would be nice, as far as open source projects that are out there, or (as a last case) a good book I can look at talking about the development of such with some examples. I am pretty well versed in code (over 30 years) just never done THIS type. I know some of the theory, just not enough to do it on my own... so... any help? Buhler?
  12. So, I developed an engine a while back following ThinMatrix's tutorials and it worked perfectly. However, upon trying to create my own simple lightweight game engine from scratch, I hit a snag. I created an engine that only wants to render my specified background color, and nothing else. I first tried to render just one cube, and when that failed I figured that i probably just had the incorrect coordinates set, so I went and generated a hundred random cubes... Nothing. Not even a framerate drop. So I figure that they aren't being passed through the shaders, however the shaders are functioning as I'm getting no errors (to my knowledge, I can't be sure). The engine itself is going to be open source and free anyways, so I don't mind posting the source here. Coded in Java, using OpenGL (from LWJGL), and in Eclipse (Neon) format. Warning: When first running the engine, it will spit out an error saying it couldn't find a config file, this will then generate a new folder in your %appdata% directory labeled 'Fusion Engine' with a Core.cfg file. This file can be opened in any old text editor, so if you aren't comfortable with that just change it in the source at: "src/utility/ConfigManager.java" before running. Just ask if you need more info, please I've been trying to fix this for a month now. Fusion Engine V2.zip
  13. JSCF is an open source, lightweight 2D canvas library based on vanilla JS and CanvasInput. Its approach is to allow extendibility while adhering to concepts from popular engines like Unity. It's still in prototype and is looking to get help and feedback from programmers. Check it out at https://github.com/g--o/JSCF. Update: now added API docs! (working with jsdoc)
  14. Hi, I'm currently working on a lightweight 2D canvas library called JSCF. It's got a lot of cool features but is still in prototype and I'd be glad to have more hands on this project + getting some feedback from programmers like you. This is an open-source project so no rev involved at all, but I think anyone knowledgable or interested in getting involved with a cool native JS 2D engine is welcome. For full feature list, contribution, prototype build and more please visit the github repo here: https://github.com/g--o/JSCF Thanks for reading 😃
  15. JSCF is an open source, lightweight 2D canvas library based on vanilla JS and CanvasInput. Its approach is to allow extendibility while adhering to concepts from popular engines like Unity. It's still in prototype and is looking to get help and feedback from programmers. Check it out at https://github.com/g--o/JSCF. Update: now added API docs! (working with jsdoc) View full story
  16. Hello everyone! First time posting in the forum. I've just completed my first game ever ( C++ / SDL ), and I am feeling utterly proud. It is a small game resembling Missile Command. The code is a mess, but it is my mess! In the process of making the game, I developed my own little game engine. My question is, where would be a good place to spread the news to at least get some people to try the game?
  17. This is a rescore of several Sin scenes from Final Fantasy X, put into an epic cinematic with accompanying, original soundtrack!
  18. I've just finished a proof-of-concept and I'm looking for feedback. The world takes place in a terminal and the user hacks through systems for some end goal (the first scenario is to hack your way through a network and kill a drone passenger by killing the drone's autopilot). The user discovers/purchases exploits (future) which can then be used on systems to gain control over them. One of the areas I find difficult is balancing measures vs. counter-measures, though this simple prototype doesn't get there yet. Levels will be defined by networks that have collections of interconnected systems that can be hacked, allowing access to systems deeper in the network (the target). It's developed in C on Linux (using ncurses). The image shows illustrates a sample scenario for stealing bitcoin from a system. Full source is available at https://github.com/mtimjones/spectre. Thanks, Tim.
  19. So I'm making this basic 2D engine using Haxe Kha, and i just need to integrate some physics. Just basic collision detection and gravity on basic shapes, nothing too detailed. But i want to try not to write it myself, so i just want suggestions on what open source phyisics engines i could use, and that wont be impossible to integrate. Thanks in advance.
  20. Hi! So, I've recently thought of a nice twist to a hack and slash-type zombie game that I'd love to make (mostly so that no one can steal the idea I'm not gonna elaborate to much on the story, but that should be no issue to help me, I think). But my problem here is that I have little to no knowledge of coding. I AM willing to learn, but I'd rather not have to develop 50 games before I've learned how to develop the game I actually wanna make. I'm just a hobbyist. I don't have that kind of endurance for this. The game I'm looking to develop is basically just your typical Player having to fight their way through masses of zombies in a city towards a certain safe place, going from location (check-point) to location. The only controls I really want for the player to have are: -to interact with objects (like talk to people aka trigger a dialogue or cutscene, pick up objects like weapons, have commentary appear when interacting with something (like the player clicking on a corpse and triggering the player thinking "Please, don't attack me to. ... Thank you very much, Sir.". All of this could be established with simply triggering a cutscene though.), -move with the arrow keys or ASWD, -have a health bar (not necessarily displayed, I just want the player to actually be able to die if they get gnawed by too many zombies) -and hack away at zombies coming towards the player. Just let out all your frustration by bashing in their faces, maybe have a satisfyingly-bloody animation when they die. -Hopefully have companion characters fight zombie hordes with you. (Although I could get creative and find excuses not to have the side-characters fight with you) -No jumping required. -Inventory would be nice but not necessary either. -Saving your current game progression manually would be great, but could be done with check-points, too. Primary focus of the game would be just having fun hacking away at zombies and getting to know the characters, who I hope to make worth getting to know. I've been researching the internet for game engines for weeks now but I haven't really found one that seemed helpful to me, mostly because the reviews are full of vocabulary that as an absolute newbie I understand none of. So, whenever I read the cons for an engine in the review I understand very little of it. Although an engine that requires absolutely no coding and still be able to perform all of this would be an absolute dream come true, I believe that's quite impossible to find. The only non-coding engines I've come across so far are absolute garbage due to limits, buggy, underdeveloped, or abandoned by their creators. I'm willing to learn coding, I'm not afraid of it as long as there are tutorials and templates out there, too. As I'm a hobbyist I'd rather not pay for an engine or to export my game. I'm most-likely not going to sell my game for money and if I do it won't be expensive at all no matter how much time I'd invest in it. Obviously the game would need to either be open source or let me publish and distribute the game freely. The only game engine I've found so far that I believe I'd understand is Adventure Game Studio, but I haven't used it much yet, just watched a couple tutorials on youtube. But it's a point-and-click only engine as it seems so it won't be of much help for this type of game, unless I get really creative with my controls (I'll keep this engine in mind for other possible projects in the future, though). I've tried Godot as well, which seems to be really hard to learn for a beginner of my level, especially as the coding language is completely unique to the engine from what I've read (and noticed myself). I did come across Unity and UE (Unreal Engine) and from what I've read it seems that Unity is better, but, again, I understand very little of any reviews I've read. What's mostly scaring me away is that services that have Premium possibilities you pay for are usually really limited in a stupid way. But if this is not the case, hey, let me know! Pixel-art-ish animation would work well, too, so an alternative to RPG Maker would be fine (or at the very least a cheap alternative where I don't have to pay monthly for). The art for the game I can provide and create completely by myself if it's 2D. I'm an artist mostly and I have experience with making comics and digital drawings (fanart mostly hahaha) and I've gotten into animation which I'm fairly decent at (I'd be willing to learn 3D animation, though!). So, that's about all the info I think might be of importance, but if there's anything more you need to know to help me, I'll answer as quick as I can!! And if you tell me I gotta give up on some of the features I want the game to have, I'd be willing to listen to suggestions. Thanks in advance to everyone who is willing to help me!
  21. I have some texture files I got from open game art alas they have no texture atlas file and I would like to make texture atlas for them. Does any one know a way to EASILY split a file up into 32*32 tiles or make a texture atlas for a a already packed image with out one.
  22. Hello, i am trying to write a game architecture. I have the script and story planned, scene by scenes, moments by moments. The game age and replayabilty has also been planned... However i lack the skill of building the AI and how it should operate against the players(wandering around for strategic positions), random number generations for attacks and combos, multiplayer features(between mobile devices or within servers), and simple things like realistic fx fire or thunder generations, screen noises and distortions... i am using Openspace 3d. Can i get some pointers on how to do each of these? The game i want to make is like digimon world PS1, xenogears, ff7... those games has all the things i want to show as the aboves.
  23. I'm an indie game development from Serbia. And yes, I'm shamelessly promoting my own open source project... As stated in the title, it's a library of data structures for constant time insertion, erasure, lookup, and fastest possible iteration. These data structures I needed on many occasions while writing both engine and gameplay code. I couldn't find any open source implementation online, so I decided to implement them myself. You can look at the code here : https://github.com/im95able/Rea
  24. GlPortal is a free and open source first person 3D teleportation puzzle-platformer written in C++ using modern OpenGL and SDL2 and its own engine. We have integrated a physics engine and a scripting engine. - Tasks from beginner to expert level - Focus on 2D, 3D, gameplay, sound, physics or logic - Contributing is as easy as fork, compile and push Stuck? We help you develop your skills. Contact us on reddit, gitter or irc! Benefits - Pressure-free environment - Space for creativity - Learn with and from your peers More Information Get more information about GlPortal at http://glportal.de and http://www.lgdb.org/game/glportal See a video at https://vimeo.com/163973907 or go to youtube and search for glportal. Contact - IRC #glportal on freenode or webchat on http://kiwiirc.com/client/irc.freenode.com/#glportal. - Reddit https://www.reddit.com/r/RadixEngine/ - Gitter https://gitter.im/GlPortal/glPortal This ad stinks? Help us improve it: https://github.com/GlPortal/ads/edit/master/developer.md
  25. I have recently created my own Sound Effects plateform: http://www.ogsoundfx.com Have a look ! There are basically 2 options that you can chose from: Packs or Single tracks. 1/ Sound effect packs/Full albums: Their price range from a few dollars up to $29 for huge collections of hundreds of sounds. If you have the budget, these packs are really worth the money. You can also wait for discounts if you are not in a hurry. 2/ Single tracks. The prices start at $0,99. The aim is to offer game developers or film makers the possibility to acquire specific sound effects for the lowest budget possible. At the moment I am offering a 50% discount for purchases of a minimum value of $10 on single tracks. So if you have $5 to spare on super high quality and professional sound effects, you get $10 worth of a selection of your choice ! I am planning on creating a permanent volume discount scheme on those single tracks. The more you buy, the bigger the discount. For now, I am only selling my own sounds, but I want to expand by allowing other sound designers to sell their sounds on www.ogsoundfx.com. What do you think ? Any opinion or advice you want to give on the presentation, the content, navigation and so on, are most welcome. And I would be happy to compensate any feedback with a nice coupon code. Oh and by the way, if you subscribe to the newsletter, you will not only be the first ones informed of great deals, but you will also receive 120 MB of free high quality sounds ! I hope to see you at http://www.ogsoundfx.com Olivier Girardot Music Composer & Sound Designer PS. Let me share latest youtube video too:
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