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Found 86 results

  1. 'Heavy Metal Impact Sound Effects' from Bluezone Corporation contains a selection of 126 carefully recorded metallic impacts. This sample pack offers a wide variety of different clanks and clunks: from big and weighty industrial container to deep and large fuel tank, old and rusty sheet metal to huge steel door, this hyper-detailed sample pack is a powerful addition to any contemporary sound design production. Moreover, all sounds in this collection are ready to use and perfect for all sorts of projects: the metal clanking and dropping sounds are carefully processed and can be easily used in modern electronic music productions. All audio files from 'Heavy Metal Impact Sound Effects' have been meticulously recorded at 24 bit / 96 kHz and are royalty-free, so that you can use them in your commercial projects without having to worry about any additional licensing fees. Editor : Bluezone Reference : BC0251 Delivery : Download link Download size : 327 MB Extracted size : 361 MB Format : WAV Resolution : 24 Bit / 96 kHz Channel : Stereo License : Royalty free Total files : 150 Total samples : 126 WAV More info and download: Heavy Metal Impact Sound Effects View full story
  2. 'Heavy Metal Impact Sound Effects' from Bluezone Corporation contains a selection of 126 carefully recorded metallic impacts. This sample pack offers a wide variety of different clanks and clunks: from big and weighty industrial container to deep and large fuel tank, old and rusty sheet metal to huge steel door, this hyper-detailed sample pack is a powerful addition to any contemporary sound design production. Moreover, all sounds in this collection are ready to use and perfect for all sorts of projects: the metal clanking and dropping sounds are carefully processed and can be easily used in modern electronic music productions. All audio files from 'Heavy Metal Impact Sound Effects' have been meticulously recorded at 24 bit / 96 kHz and are royalty-free, so that you can use them in your commercial projects without having to worry about any additional licensing fees. Editor : Bluezone Reference : BC0251 Delivery : Download link Download size : 327 MB Extracted size : 361 MB Format : WAV Resolution : 24 Bit / 96 kHz Channel : Stereo License : Royalty free Total files : 150 Total samples : 126 WAV More info and download: Heavy Metal Impact Sound Effects
  3. Hi community ! Check out my new "Magma Chamber" sound design track. What do you think ? Would you use it for your projects involving volcano sceneries ? You can find this sound and more volcano sounds on my website: http://www.ogsoundfx.com/
  4. ERASERHEAD STUDIO

    13 RONIN - DevLog #5 - Shouts N' Music

    It's been a long hot summer with wildfires crossing our country. We Swedes have a tendency to complain about the weather, mostly we think it's too cold, but after this summer I think most of us welcome fall and the cooler air. During the summer I've been working on a little bit of everything but mostly I've been focusing on sound. But before I go into that topic I'd like to present the milestone I'm currently working towards. First public build Before Christmas I like to release my first public developer build including: One player mode. One level, the tavern, featuring: Windy rain. People drinking inside the tavern. Flies buzzing around a lantern. An opponent dressed in white. Move forward, backward, turn, dodge, turn dodging, jump, front- and backflip. Four different attacks and ways to parry them. One death sequence. Blood splatter. One idle animation variation. One MIDI song arranged with classical instruments. Sound effects, only normalized, not processed in any other way. HUD including score and energy. Camera shake. This might not look like much, but for a one-man team, only working weekends and evenings it might even be too much. Sound If you've read my earlier posts you know I ordered an Arturia keyboard that happened to be broken on delivery. This caused a lot of annoyance and delayed my music production but now I've finally got all my gear set up. The keyboard is an Arturia KeyLab 49 and the speakers Audioengine A2+. Included with the keyboard was a DAW called Ableton Live. I don't know if this software is good or bad, I just know that I couldn't get my head around it. Instead, I've chosen to work with Studio One Prime, which is a free but limited version of Studio One, and has a user interface I feel comfortable working in. SFX To create a feeling of being inside an old samurai movie I'm going to use sounds from various movies as basis for the sound effects. So while waiting for the new keyboard to arrive I've spent a few summer evenings extracting sounds. It's amazing how much panting, grunting and screaming there are in those old movies. After a while I had to skip the speakers and use my headphones instead, if I hadn't I'm sure my neighbors would have thought I'd started some kind of torture dungeon and sent the police on me. Something I hadn't thought of, but became apparent during this process was the fact that there is almost always a howling wind in the background of old Japanese action scenes. This of course made a lot of the sound useless. Despite this unfortunate fact I now have quite an impressive collection of sounds including footsteps, screams, shouting, panting, growling, sword swooshes, sword clashes, and hits. So far I've converted the sound effects to stereo, I've normalized them and cleaned them from as much noise as possible without distorting the sound I want to keep. For my first public developer build I consider them done, but before releasing a demo of the game I will process them further. Early sound effects Scream of pain Sword hit Sword clash Music When on vacation, visiting my father in my hometown of Boden, I borrowed his Yamaha keyboard and a few evenings later I had the main melody for the first game song ready. I call it “Ronin encounter” and this is the song that will be included in the first developer build. I've not yet decided what style of music I want for the game. For a while I had my mind set on 8-bit music like the music made for the C64. It's a style of music that would sit well with the low-resolution retro graphics, but since I want the game to remind the player of old Japanese movies it might be better to use a musical style resembling the style found in those movies. Nothing is set in stone, but for now, I'll go with the latter. The final product will include at least three different songs, one for the intro-screen, one for the highscore-screen and one or more for the gameplay. Sit back and enjoy a rough mix of the first gameplay song - "Ronin encounter": Ronin Encounter.mp3 To make the music match the quality of the sound effects and also enhance the feeling of an old movie I'll give the music an old vintage sound. Ronin Encounter, vintage.mp3 If you wonder what instrument the strange "plucking" sound comes from, it's called "Shamisen" and is a Japanese three-stringed traditional instrument not unlike the western banjo. Shamisen is featured in many samurai-movies and often played by a geisha and sometimes accompanied by a man singing in a dark voice. A geisha playing shamisen. That was all for this post. Please let me know what you think! Next time - graphics! Happy coding! /jan.
  5. Royalty Free Music for Game Developers If you found this page, you probably wondered at some point, "Why is it called Royalty Free Music when none of it is FREE?!" and maybe you already learned the definition of Royalty Free does not necessarily mean the content itself is free but rather refers to the "right to use copyrighted material without the need to pay license fees or usage fees." To put it simply, Royalty Free just means you don't have to pay to use the content. So why do so many people charge for it, and isn't that exactly the opposite of what Royalty Free means? Obviously artists and content makers who spend a lot of effort making something should be rewarded for their time, but in my opinion, they should not use the term "Royalty Free" to refer to their paid content. That is why I developed a FREE Royalty Free Music for YouTube Library for anyone and everyone who is looking for free professional music to use in their films, television shows, youtube promos, video games, you get the picture. How to Download To begin, simply choose a category of music from the list on the website linked above: Once you have selected your desired category of music, hover your mouse or finger over it and click the red button that appears to open up a small window with a media player in it that will look something like this: Click a song to listen to it, and click the down arrow to download the song, it's that easy! Licensing & Copyright Information If you like the song and you want to use it in a non-commercial project (something that does not earn you money) you can do that for free simply by attributing me in your credits somewhere! Just put "Music by Jordan Winslow on https://jordanwinslow.me/royaltyfreemusic" or simply "Music Downloaded from https://jordanwinslow.me/royaltyfreemusic" If you would like to use the music in a commercial project (something that earns you money) there is still no charge, but one more step: simply fill out the Royalty Free Music Commercial License Request Form. Downloading Free Royalty Free Music for your YouTube creations has never been so easy!
  6. Royalty Free Music for Game Developers If you found this page, you probably wondered at some point, "Why is it called Royalty Free Music when none of it is FREE?!" and maybe you already learned the definition of Royalty Free does not necessarily mean the content itself is free but rather refers to the "right to use copyrighted material without the need to pay license fees or usage fees." To put it simply, Royalty Free just means you don't have to pay to use the content. So why do so many people charge for it, and isn't that exactly the opposite of what Royalty Free means? Obviously artists and content makers who spend a lot of effort making something should be rewarded for their time, but in my opinion, they should not use the term "Royalty Free" to refer to their paid content. That is why I developed a FREE Royalty Free Music for YouTube Library for anyone and everyone who is looking for free professional music to use in their films, television shows, youtube promos, video games, you get the picture. How to Download To begin, simply choose a category of music from the list on the website linked above: Once you have selected your desired category of music, hover your mouse or finger over it and click the red button that appears to open up a small window with a media player in it that will look something like this: Click a song to listen to it, and click the down arrow to download the song, it's that easy! Licensing & Copyright Information If you like the song and you want to use it in a non-commercial project (something that does not earn you money) you can do that for free simply by attributing me in your credits somewhere! Just put "Music by Jordan Winslow on https://jordanwinslow.me/royaltyfreemusic" or simply "Music Downloaded from https://jordanwinslow.me/royaltyfreemusic" If you would like to use the music in a commercial project (something that earns you money) there is still no charge, but one more step: simply fill out the Royalty Free Music Commercial License Request Form. Downloading Free Royalty Free Music for your YouTube creations has never been so easy! View full story
  7. Hi, my name is Olivier Girardot, I am a music composer and a sound designer. Here is a sound atmosphere I made for a video game project: a Medieval City Atmosphere by Night: You can find this sound and loads more at: http://www.ogsoundfx.com
  8. Greetings! My name is Carlos Jiménez, I am a sound designer and music composer for video games. I am looking for passionate and active independent teams or developers to work and create the best possible projects. I have experience with a lot of genres, always open to learn and know new frontiers. My main tools for the creation of music and sound are: Presonus Studio One 3 Avid Protools Propellerhead Reason Native Instruments Komplete (a lot of instruments vst) Field recording Finale and Sibelius for musical notation Fmod and Wwise Unity (I can integrate the audio in the project) Here you can listen and see some samples of my work. https://soundcloud.com/verblendetstudios https://open.spotify.com/album/3912kLY4O6SsoOE3bnI82t https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Iz6phBoWcsY&feature=youtu.be https://youtu.be/gPt8RKOHzRA https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qsJqgQDb0dA https://verblendetstudios.bandcamp.com/ https://store.steampowered.com/app/664000/HammerHelm/ https://store.steampowered.com/app/643260/Break_Stuff_With_Coins/ https://store.steampowered.com/app/776720/Dungeon_Gambit_Boy/ Do not hesitate to contact me: contact.jbazz@gmail.com Discord: Verblendet # 6007 CV.pdf
  9. Check out my last video where I show you how I create some scary background atmospheres !
  10. I created this youtube channel to share with you different aspects of sound design. I talk about sound effects in films, I share some of my work, and I give tips and tutorials on how to make specific sounds. My first concern is about the length of the video which exceeds 10 minutes. On the other hand I could have gone into much more details, like explaining how I created some of these sounds.
  11. Top 5 Community Questions: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. ------------- Questions Will Appear As They Are Submitted By The Community ------------- Hey guys, I am currently writing a few audio guides for game developers and music producers but I am having trouble coming up with good topics to address, so what better way then to ask you guys yourselves! Please tell me, if there was only one thing you could learn about the usage of music, sound effects or general audio in video games or music production in general, what would it be? And if there are a few more questions you have, please list them as well! I want to see which questions routinely pop up in the community over and over so I can address the top 5-10 questions everyone has and write a guide on it! Thanks for contributing your questions!
  12. Hey guys! Here's around 50 music/sound effect tracks I've made. You can download them for free and use them in your own work as you please. If you do, please credit me as Debutante or Chris Zimmermann. Also: You don't have to, but let me know if you release any work that uses one of these tracks. I'm excited to see how people rework them. That being said (and I can't believe I have to say this but) please don't utilize this for politically driven use. Most of the tracks were made with Ableton and Orgmaker presets. Some tracks contain an Amen Break sample. There's a readme with more information on the individual tracks. Enjoy!! I had a blast working on these and compiling them, this probably won't be the last stock music/SFX pack I'll upload. Edit; It's available on itch.io too! Here: https://rhetoricsff.itch.io/debutante-musicsfx-pack-i
  13. If you’re a freelance engineer or composer with an interest in working in game audio, it can be overwhelming when you’re trying to figure out where to begin. Some game studios can seem unapproachable or difficult to get in touch with the right person. In this article, I detail 5 tips for freelancing in game audio, from finding the gigs to delivering an amazing final product. 1. Find the Opportunity If you’ve already found a game studio or client, then you can skip this tip. For everyone else, this can be the scariest part of getting into freelance work especially in the audio world. Where do you even begin to connect to the engineering and composing gigs in the game studio world? I recommend starting with your very own network. Who around you do you know that might be able to help you connect to a job? The answer could very well be no one… directly. Check out your contacts on LinkedIn. Are they connected to someone you might want to meet? Don’t be a shy, ask for an introduction. Along these lines, if you’re in school studying engineering or music don’t be a stranger to your alumni associations. Ask your school’s career services if they have any contacts, via alumni or otherwise, with game studios or even better: audio producers at game studios. There are a number of job and gig websites out there that try to connect freelancers like you with companies looking to hire. These can offer some great opportunities. If you see one that appeals to you and you might be qualified for, do a little homework. Is there someone in your network that can perhaps get you an introduction or at least some background on the gig posted? Sometimes a job posted sounds better than it actually is. Some job boards I recommend: AES Job Board (also, look into joining AES. They have tons of community resources for all kinds of audio-related questions) GearSlutz Entertainmentcareers.net Indeed.com Most of the work we do at my studio comes via personal recommendations. Satisfied clients tell other people about our work and then those people hire us to help them with their new project. It was through this loose network of connections and earned reputation that we landed gigs with Rockstar Games and other studios. It takes a lot of hustle and patience, but eventually you should be able to get your foot in the door. TLDR: Exhaust your personal connections before relying on cold reach-outs to game studios. 2. Listen to Your Client You might be the next coming of Koji Kondo (Mario, Zelda) or Martin O’Donnell (Halo), but that might not be what your client needs. Being on the same page with the game studio is imperative for a successful working relationship. The approach to a horror-survival game should be different from a Nintendo children’s game. When you get a gig from a game studio or a producer, it’s not necessarily an invitation to showcase every last skill you possess as a composer or engineer. While you might be immensely talented, you need to be judicious about the way you unleash those talents on any given project. You also need to keep your budget in mind. If a game studio wants an orchestral score but they don’t have the money to hire a 64 piece orchestra, you might need to use patches and a midi controller to emulate it the best you can. The bottom line is that it’s your job to deliver the final product to your client per their wishes, not to showcase your talents above all else. Making your current clients happy is one of the best strategies for getting new ones! TLDR: Make sure you’re writing or engineering material per your clients wishes. 3. Execute on a Schedule This tip could also be called: Keep Your Promises Reasonable and Communicate. One of the most important selling points of my services and my studio is staying on schedule. The audio and music in a video game is just one component of the overall product and, as a freelancer, you might be completely unaware of how your work will fit into the final game. As such, the most important date for you should be when the client needs the first pass and final delivery. At my studio, we mostly use a shared Google calendar to keep all employees and freelancers up to date on scheduling, tracking, and editing. We have a main studio shared calendar and then I keep a separate calendar with the engineers I hire the most often. They usually book time for their own projects but to ensure I have the best talent for my projects, I keep them on a specific calendar together. That makes it easy to communicate if/when a session needs to be moved or we have some other change in plans. Very closely related to keeping your project on schedule is communication. Stuff happens! Sometimes a project timeline can get derailed by things out of your control like weather, traffic, injuries, and so forth. The important thing is to keep your client updated with any changes in the schedule. TLDR: Keep your schedule reasonable and communicate if things change. 4. Work the Revisions Let’s put it this way: when a client requests edits or changes to anything you’ve submitted, don’t take it personally. You probably just spent a lot of time and effort to get the work to an acceptable stage to submit to your client. When they come back with numerous changes it can be deflating. Remember, though, your job is to make your client happy. They’re not criticizing your work for the sake of being contrarian. They have their own priorities (usually getting the audio/score component ready to fit with the rest of the game) and are only trying to get the audio or music where it needs to be. Developing the skill of having ‘thick skin’ can be one of the most important skills to have as a freelance engineer or composer. This isn’t art class, it’s business. There have been many times at my studio where we need to provide multiple rounds of revisions. This is not unusual or something to panic about. It’s a little like building Ikea furniture, it’s better to get it right than to just get it done. It’s painful, but sometimes undoing the work you’ve done is the best way to get it right in the end. TLDR: Don’t take it personally when a client requests edits big or small. 5. Final Delivery Follow through. If you have final approval from your client, you then need to deliver the files per their instructions. Don’t skip these important details: each client might have completely different needs with regards for delivery. Sometimes the files can be hundreds of gigabytes. Pay attention to these details to make sure the conclusion of the gig is painless for your client. This will leave them happy, satisfied and more likely to recommend you to others or hire you again in the future. Also, if they ask you to sign an NDA or otherwise not to talk about your work until a certain date, don’t break that agreement. Nothing will sour you to the industry like spoilers. TLDR: Pay attention to the way your client wants their final product delivered to them. Bonus Tip (Don’t Give Up): You may have noticed that Tip 1 above contains many more pieces of advice than 2-5. This is because the first step of this process can be the most difficult. You’ve already developed your skills as an engineer, sound designer, or composer. Proving your talents and worth to game studios then becomes its own challenge. Don’t give up. The more you put yourself out there, the more likely you’ll develop connections that turn into paying gigs! Ned Sedlak owns and operates Refuge Recording Studio in Brooklyn, NY. Refuge specializes in quality audio production, from tracking to mixing to editing. The studio also houses writing/production rooms as well as an independent record label. Ned is a graduate of Berklee College of Music where he studied Music Production & Engineering.
  14. So you're a filmmaker entering post-production on your film, a game developer working on music and audio triggers or perhaps a YouTuber wanting to enhance your videos. You need SFX and a music soundtrack but you might not have the budget to hire a professional composer or audio engineer. The question is: Can you still have a great commercial soundtrack and great SFX for your project utilizing only free resources? Definitely. Quick story about why I am writing this article: My career is in electronic music production, but I also love game design and have always wanted to create my own video game, so 2 years ago I decided to produce my first interactive horror visual novel. I was designing everything in-house: music, SFX, graphics, writing, everything. Many of you reading this are probably quite similar to me and are doing most of the work for your project yourself. I could handle the music, the writing, and the code, but there was no avoiding the obvious fact that I was terrible at drawing and I did not have the field-recording equipment necessary to record my own sound effects. I also did not have the budget to hire an audio engineer or an artist to provide me with SFX and the artwork needed for the game, so I had a dilemma. How do I immerse the player in my story without quality sound effects, artwork, and no budget to pay for them? Well, I did what I always do when I have a problem that seems impossible to overcome: I asked the internet. I spent days researching online and long story short I found dozens of websites providing free commercially-usable resources for my project. And imagine my surprise when a few of these free resources...didn't suck! Not only did I end up finishing my game without spending a penny, but I could still sell it! So I got to thinking, what about filmmakers, game developers, and YouTubers who already have great video and artwork but need great music and SFX? Are there equally-powerful free music libraries out there to search and download from? I did my research and once again found some incredible resources that I am going to share with you now! And not just that, but I'm going to help you incorporate and edit these free resources so they don't sound like you just downloaded them off random websites online. Here's what we are going to cover: Where to obtain free, commercially usable music & SFX for your project without sacrificing the quality of your end-product How to edit music and SFX you downloaded from widely different sources to create a unified soundtrack that works with your project How to create loops, fade-ins, fade-outs and layer audio to immerse the audience Licensing, what it means and what restrictions you have when using these resources (not many, I promise) How to change the format of your audio to work with your software Where to find volunteers or paid professionals if you can't find what you need So without boring you to death, let's get started with the best 9 websites to download free, commercially-usable music & SFX! TOP 5 FREE COMMERCIALLY USABLE MUSIC LIBRARIES: (For SFX, Keep Scrolling) JordanWinslow.me - My Personal Library of Hundreds of Electronic & Orchestral Soundtracks Arranged by Category for Free Download - License: Free Commercial Use With Attribution (See Terms of Service on Website) As I said before, I have been producing electronic music for over 14 years now, 5 years of which it has been my primary source of income. So I wanted to put together my own free resource for others to benefit from! These are some of my absolute best soundtracks, many of which are loopable. And I spent many days organizing them by category and mood to make it easier for you to find what you're looking for! And the best thing is, all of the tracks can be listened to without even leaving the page and can be easily downloaded in 1 click! Icons8 - Incredibly Well-Sorted, Professional Library of Hundreds of Songs from Various Artists - License: “Free for a Link” (See Website) Don’t be fooled by this company’s origin: They started off as graphic designers who made icons, thus Icons8. But they have evolved and got their hands on a rather large music library of various artists who have been curated by their team. Naturally, when a library is curated, it is subjective and therefore might not be to your tastes if you disagree with how they select their tracks for inclusion on their website, but it can’t hurt to take a look at their gallery since it is so incredibly well-sorted! Incompetech - A Classic Library of a Few Hundred Songs Ranging from Classic Rock to Jazz - License: Primarily Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 Incompetech has been around for quite some time and is recommended by many other bloggers because it provides a convenient category system. Unfortunately, the tracks are not organized by mood or tonal characteristics other than genre, so you will find tracks with the instruments you are looking for, but it may take some digging to find the appropriate mood you are looking for. dig cc mixter - A Massive Library of Non-Categorized Music Submitted by Various Artists - License: Primarily Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 Unfortunately dig cc mixter, though a MASSIVE resource with tons of great tracks, is not a great place to find music in the specific genre you are looking for as there are no categories and no search functions to speak of. If you are willing to spend the time looking through thousands of tracks though, you will find a few hidden gems on here that will fit perfectly in your project! Josh Woodward - 200+ Primarily Acoustic & Electric Guitar Driven Songs - License: Commercial Use With Attribution (See Website for Terms) The best part about Josh Woodward’s free commercially usable library is that he has tagged each and every song with different moods, themes, and styles to make it very easy for Filmmakers, Game Developers & Artists to search through tracks to find songs in the mood they are looking for! Honorable Mention: Partners in Rhyme - A Little Over 100 Free Unsorted Music Loops - License: Free for a “Thanks” or With Attribution (Vague, See Terms on Website) This library is more of a last resort as the tracks are unsorted and not as high quality as others on this list, however free is free and these tracks would be suitable for app developers or creators who are looking for this type of sound. TOP 3 FREE COMMERCIALLY USABLE SFX LIBRARIES: ZapSplat - 27,000+ Searchable Sound Effects Recorded by Professionals - License: Free Commercial Use With Attribution ZapSplat is by far my favorite free SFX resource. When I first discovered their website it had far fewer audio files and a much less appealing logo design. It appears they are dedicated to growth because they have completely redesigned their branding and added thousands of audio clips to their website! I personally used this resource in the development of my Horror Visual Novel titled “The Watchers.” Soundeffects+ - Over 5000 Free Sound Effects Sorted by 16 Categories - License: Free Commercial Use With Attribution (See Website for More Details) Soundeffects+ offers a large library sorted by the categories visible in the screenshot above. See something you’re looking for? Click the link and go check it out. Otherwise, keep scrolling! Videvo - 400 Free Sound Effects Sorted by Over 20 Categories - License: Complicated, each sound effect has it’s own license and it varies. Check each sound page for the license. Videvo is primarily a stock video provider with many free video clips, but they are also breaking into sound as well and have an expanding library of 440 clips which isn’t much but they are very well sorted so it should be easy to find something unique for your project. Make sure you check their licensing page as their licensing is quite complex compared to other websites. In the above 9 websites, you should be able to obtain all of the sound effects and music for your project as long as you are willing to put in the time filtering and searching through these libraries to find what you are looking for. It may seem like a daunting task, but I have done it personally myself in my game development and have had great success! My suggestion to you is download anything that sounds interesting to you at the time, even if you are unsure if you can use it in your project or not, and copy-paste the license information into a .txt file so you don’t forget to give proper attribution. Part 2: How to Choose the Right Music & SFX for Each Scene, and How to Edit Audio to Achieve Your Goals Once you have a selection of songs or SFX for your project it's time to edit. Since most of you will be using many different types of software I am only going to cover how to edit music in 3rd party FREE software, namely Audacity. Don't knock it, Audacity is very powerful software and unless you're considering a career in audio engineering, music production, sound design or mixing, this is probably the only tool you'll ever need. If you want more professional audio editing tools I highly suggest iZotope's RX6 software as it allows you to do incredible things such as take backgrounds out of one scene and move them into another, repair poor recordings and dubbing, and more. How to loop music that wasn't originally recorded as a loop: To achieve this the easiest method is to create a soft fade-in and fade-out on the track. You can experiment with different values but 1-2 seconds on each end usually suffices unless the music is louder or more complex, then you can try up to 4 seconds on each end or even more for atmospheric loops. Here is an easy to follow video tutorial on fade-ins, fade-outs and looping audio: https://youtu.be/ryLpfVecUDs How to make everything sound cohesive, as if everything was designed specifically for your project: Keep in mind, layering audio is an incredibly easy, yet very powerful tool at your disposal. You can loop one audio track while another one continues to play underneath it to keep the player from noticing the loop. You can even create elaborate scenes with chattering people, blowing wind, ambient tones, and musical accompaniment. All of these types of atmospheres can be downloaded at the above free resources! It is important to consider the stylistic and tonal changes of the music you downloaded when switching from one song to another. Don't just go from a percussive action track straight into a somber atmospheric melody. Transitioning is key: utilize fade-ins and fade-outs during most, if not all of your audio changes so the experience draws the audience further into your story rather than taking their focus off the screen and into the audio. Oh yeah, and... Epic Music Does Not Make a Boring Scene More Epic! I think there is a huge problem in the video game industry specifically (filmmakers don't scoff, it's a problem in your industry too, but perhaps less pronounced) where game developers think if they make the music louder and louder and more and more epic it will somehow make the game more fun or the experience more immersive. Well, it doesn't. Many times have I been playing through a game or watching a film where the audio is 10X more dramatic than what is happening on screen and it makes me just want to mute it or turn it down. This is not the experience you want to give your audience, trust me. Consider the emotion of every scene before you place any music and ensure that listening to the music by itself gives you the feeling you want the player to have, but don't expect the music and sound effects to do the work for you on making the scene enjoyable and immersive! Once you have a rough draft of your soundtrack & SFX library, go back to Step 1 and make SURE you didn’t miss any audio that may be in other categories you didn’t listen to that might fit the scenes you’re working on. Part 3: Obtain the Appropriate License to Use the Music & SFX and Ensure You Have Given Proper Attribution Whenever you’re working with royalty free music & SFX you always have to keep in mind that just because the music is free doesn’t mean you don’t have to cite the author. For example, if you’re using my personal Royalty Free Music Catalog I linked to earlier then this part is very simple: If you will not make money from your project directly or indirectly (this includes advertisements and YouTube monetization) then all you have to do is put “Music Downloaded From https://JordanWinslow.Me/RoyaltyFreeMusic” in your credits, description or somewhere easily visible in your project. If you will make money from your project directly or indirectly, simply fill out the Commercial License Request Form found on the website and enter in the title of your project and your project’s information for EACH project you will require music for. All of the sites I linked above have very similar licensing agreements, so just read up on the individual website before you download, and ensure you create a .txt document with all the links you need so you don’t forget! The best part about all of the above libraries is that almost every song and SFX clip you download can be legally edited, looped, layered, remixed and changed any way you see fit! The only restriction is you cannot sell or distribute your edited or remixed audio clips as standalone clips if they were your own because technically the author still retains copyright ownership over the files. But that does not mean you can't sell your film or video game with the edited audio! If you are confused, double-check the licensing page on each website to be sure. And that’s how you spend time instead of money to create a custom soundtrack for your film, video game or YouTube video! What to Do if you Still Haven’t Found What You’re Looking For, or the Audio You Downloaded isn’t the Correct Format If the audio you downloaded isn’t in the correct format for your software, you can use the free open source tool Audacity to convert it by using the "Export" menu to change the format of your audio or use this free online audio converter. Keep in mind that certain audio formats like .mp3 have restrictions on where they can be used. I recommend .ogg since it is an open source audio format with great quality and compression. Now if for some reason you don’t find the music or SFX you need in those libraries of thousands of songs and SFX, it’s probably time to consider looking for a volunteer composer or simply hiring a professional. You can find low-cost audio engineers and composers on websites like Fiverr and Upwork, but keep in mind that quality products do not often come with low price tags, be wary of anything that seems "too good to be true" because it probably is. And be sure to listen to their portfolio thoroughly before making a decision! I know it’s not easy to make a career out of your passions when you’re on a limited budget, believe me, just read My Story if you want to know how I spent 6 years in poverty before becoming a successful electronic music producer & composer. But I guarantee if you put the time into finding music and SFX in the above libraries, or looking for a great volunteer, you can get your project done at no cost other than the hardware and software you purchased! If you have any questions, feel free to reach out to me any time! See you later, creators! Electronic Music Producer, Composer & Audio Engineer https://JordanWinslow.Me
  15. ddabrahim

    Text to Voice converter?

    Hi all! I'm looking for a software that I can use to convert text to a human male and female voice and then save it to an audio file. I was searching online and did find many converter. But they are not clear regarding that if I can use the audio files for commercial purposes or not. Could anyone recommend any software that I can definitely use for commercial purposes? I would appreciate any help. Thanks.
  16. Hi! I need a sound artist for creating bg, sfx, etc for games in a small startup company. What qualification or skills should I search for? What software should he/she know? Is there anything else he/she should know when creating BG music, sfx, etc? Any tips before I start searching?
  17. Hi! My name is David. I am a 3D modeler with two years of experience in modelling and four to five in the game development industry. I have been in many teams before and have experience in things other than modelling. I will mention them below! My portfolio: https://www.artstation.com/ieida I will describe the game shortly and give you a document to read after messaging me. The project's name is My Piece(might change). The game is very short but sweet, designed for a team of up to 3 developers max. Basically, it is a visual novel that does crime solving in a unique way. The game will eventually break the fourth wall as well, like many other. I am aware. Looking for: Unity programmer (experience/will to program and polish game mechanics) and sound effects artist. Requirements: willing to work on someone else's project, calm, cooperative, self-motivating and dedicated. You should also be willing to spend at least 4 hours a day on our project. If there is enough work of course. Things I have experience in other than modeling: VFX(Unity's shuriken only), graphic design(UI and logos), basic coding(C#), game design, rigging and animation. I possess all of the skills mentioned above in Requirements, so all I want is for others to do the same so we can work well together! I will handle all of the art needed. I will spend at least 6 hours a day on the game, as well as be on all of the time to talk to the team. Length of project: as I said, it is designed with a small team in mind, so I would say it can be done in one to three months of hard work. Rev-share project! Contact: either message me on Discord Leida -#8727 or e-mail me gomnosano@gmail.com Hope to work with some of you soon! Have a nice day :).
  18. These samples are royalty-free and can be used in television and radio broadcasts, film or video productions, video games, web promos, music tracks, commercial audio and/or visual productions. You can download the free sample pack at Bluezone Corporation (on the main page, scroll to bottom, registration not required): www.bluezone-corporation.com
  19. These samples are royalty-free and can be used in television and radio broadcasts, film or video productions, video games, web promos, music tracks, commercial audio and/or visual productions. You can download the free sample pack at Bluezone Corporation (on the main page, scroll to bottom, registration not required): www.bluezone-corporation.com View full story
  20. Olivier Girardot

    Tsunami Sound Effect

    Here is how I created a Tsunami Sound Effect from scratch. I don't recall seeing any Tsunamis in a video game so far, not even in Sim City's disaster mode, but who knows, this video might come in handy one day. Before getting into to this, I know you game developers are looking for high quality sound effect. I recommend you check out my website: http://www.ogsoundfx.com I also know a lot of you can't afford to purchase sound effects for your indie game that you put your heart and guts into developing. So here are a few ways to get a pretty nice collection of free SFX: 1. Subscribe to my Youtube Channel and get this for free: http://www.ogsoundfx.com/product/youtube-subscribers-pack/ 2. Subscribe to my Newsletter and get 120MB of professional sound effects ! Enjoy the video !
  21. **The game must be in the final stages of development and be close to release. Willing to do SFX or Music for free since Horror games heavily interest me.** Hey there! My name is Cpaws and I compose music, sound effects and overall sound design for video games and film. I've worked on numerous games and I'm looking to specifically pick up a Horror game. If you're interested in working together, don't hesitate to contact me at cpawsmusic@gmail.com Here's a few demo reels of my past projects: Game Music I've Composed: https://soundcloud.com/cpawsmusic/sets/cpaws-video-game-film-music Website/Portfolio: https://CpawsMusic.com/ E-mail: cpawsmusic@gmail.com
  22. Hi! My name is Simon Felix, and I am a composer and sound designer based in Ghent, Belgium. I started out in the electronic music scene, but gradually branched out to orchestral music and soundtracks. I just finished the soundtrack for Shift Quantum, and I'm looking for a new project! Samples Here you can listen to some of my work: Blazing Sails: The main theme for an upcoming pirate-themed combat game. The Necropolis: One of the themes for an upcoming RTS. Adventure Awaits: One of the themes for an upcoming RTS. Winds of White: The main theme of an upcoming RPG. Zerhen's Grace: A calming piece for a cancelled RPG project. Rooftop Botanist: A soothing piano theme made for a cancelled project. Submarine Waltz: Title says it all, could be a theme for an adventure or point-and-click game. Compensation Rates are negotiable. I might be open to rev-share agreements, providing that the project is near completion. Contact I hope you enjoy, and feel free to contact me at simon.felix09@gmail.com, or send me a PM, if you are interested in working together. You can follow me on twitter here: @SimonFelixMusic, and on Facebook here: https://facebook.com/SimonFelixMusic
  23. Welcome to my new Youtube video where I show you my new Punch Sound Effects ! Soon available in my Sound Effect Online shop: http://www.ogsoundfx.com Don't forget to subscribe to my newsletter to get 120 MB of FREE high quality sound effects: http://www.ogsoundfx.coml/welcome
  24. Hello, I'm new to OpenAL and audio programming in general so I might not explain everything clearly, but bear with me. Essentially I'm making a tower defense game where I have dozens of turrets shooting at approximately the same time and each shot makes a sound. So there are few problems/questions which I have: 1) While one turret is shooting the volume of the shot is low, but when dozens of them are shooting the sounds seem to add up and make everything too loud. Is there a way I can fix this? 2) When there are many turrets shooting, the music becomes quiet. And when they stop shooting I can hear the music gradually up in volume. Does OpenAL use some sort of compression? If so, how can I tweak it? I tried making it so that there would be a max number of shot sounds at any given time, but sometimes you can see a turret shooting and it doesn't make any noise, which looks weird.
  25. Louis Brady

    Week Three: Soundtracking

    Hi again! Don't be mad. I forgot to post yesterday. This is weekly and weekly means every Sunday.... It's Monday. I literally forgot. Like.... ooops. Anyway! This week I worked on Soundtracking my game. I added sound effects too. Let me start off with some inner conflicts I ran into. The main conflict was, "I must create everything myself." Like the coin sound effect, and the door closing sound effect, but guys, there are websites that have CC0 SFX's. I'll just put their names in the credits and call it a day. Resourcing should not be a crime. Not crediting the source is a crime. But that's what I struggled with at the beginning of the week. I then made the music for the beginning levels, the save and load screen, and the opening scenes. I had to revisit one of the songs a few times because I just couldn't get the right feel to the song... But I'm 99.99% sure it's right. If you have any specific questions about my process or my ideology of FL Studio game soundtracking, you could always leave me a message. I do want to drop this link for you so you can get a sample of some good good of what's to come Something interesting also happened this week. I had two people play my game and give me feedback for the first time. To my surprise, it was better feedback than I was expecting and that really motivated me. They only played for about ten minutes, but the amount of feedback I got from watching them play my game was very helpful. I can't say too much about the experience, except that they really enjoyed the game. I saw how the mechanics worked for someone who had no knowledge of the game used the mechanics in their own way. That was helpful. Until next time!
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