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  1. Please check out my new game which is level based infinite target shooter. For Android https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.KPGames.KillSwitchFor iOS https://apps.apple.com/in/app/kill-switch-2d/id1483464098Please let me know what you think about this. Also any suggestion feedback are most welcome.
  2. Devlog #4- Saving Space October 22nd, 2019 Connect with us on Social Media: Facebook: www.facebook.com/TumultuousProductions Twitter: https://twitter.com/TumultuousGame Join our Discord Server: Join the Yami Discord Want to Join the Project? Fill out our google forms Online Application For more about the Studio : About Us Tumultuous Productions Check out our website for Yami! https://tumultuousproductions.site/index2.html For more about Yami: Our Game: Yami Weekly Updates Week 4: Discover the world of Raum The game of Yami takes place within the planet Raum, known for its harsh climates and immense gravity upon its surface. Raum has four moons, and orbits two suns at the center of its solar system. Below is a brief description of each of the heavenly bodies players will spot in the sky during their gameplay, as well as concept art produced by Tumultuous Productions’ talented artists! Moons: Shattered Twins: Two smaller moons within the Raum sky, encircle one another in their own gravitational pull. Debris and rocky dust swirl around both moons as they rotate around one another. Some of the smaller dust and debris have begun to form a faint ring around the moons. The Eye of Rage: The surface of this larger moon is covered completely with oxidized iron, giving it a reddened appearance to the inhabitants of Raum. This moon has an asynchronous cycle with the Eye of Mourning, with one day a year the two ‘Eyes are Open’ and one day a year when the two ‘Eyes are Closed.’ These two days were considered sacred to the ancients, and signified important events. When the Eye of Rage is full in the sky, it is considered an omen for danger or violence. The Eye of Mourning: The surface of this moon is covered with vast oceans and two polar ice caps, giving it an impression of a teary eye in the sky. This moon has an asynchronous cycle with the Eye of Rage, as aforementioned. When this moon is full in the night sky, it is considered an omen for great sadness or loss. Suns: The two suns of this planet are part of a binary star system, where the two orbit around one another due to their intense gravitational pull. There is a ‘thread’ between the two in the sky, as one star is slowly absorbing energy from the other. Dorhen: The larger of the two suns, a Class O Blue Giant Star, giving it a large and blue appearance in the day sky. Ettas: The smaller of the two suns, a White Dwarf star, which has a luminous white light in the sky, but provides little heat to the surface of Raum. (Concept art of the celestial bodies within the world of Yami) Saving and Loading your game in Yami Within the game of Yami, there will be various locations where the player will be able to save their game. When returning to your journey, you will be able to load your game from multiple save slots. Below are our concept designs for loading screens and save files. (Save/Load Concept) Weekly Member Spotlight: Seik Lucid For this week, I asked one of our hard-working and incredibly talented coders, ‘SeikLuceid’, a few questions about how they got into coding, and what their creative process looks like. Q: What is the process for coding a video game? A: “I could go on for days on this subject, game engines, and psuedo-code, both of which are good tips: but what it all comes down to? Breaking your goals up into their smallest parts, smaller than you might be able to consider them as even a 'part' of the goal if possible, then figuring out how to make those pieces work towards your end goal. Psuedo-code is a great tool, Adaptability is important, but functionality is your main goal, especially starting out. If it works, it can be refined. Personally, I use Pseudocode, then I use in-game prompts or debug lines, then I fill them in one at a time, piece by piece, until I get the functionality I need. Afterwards: I begin worrying about cleaning it up, optimizing it, and refactoring it into adaptable, and readable code. Q: What made you interested in making a video game? A: “As with most game enthusiasts, playing games as a child. I spent a lot of time playing games, indulging in the stories and enthusiasm that surrounded games. Unlike the modern days, games were a secret hobby you did by yourself, when no one was around when I was young. Games didn't even really have a multiplayer. Arcades were still a thing, if that helps to place it for you. By the time it became socially acceptable to play games, was about the time I got my first computer, and really started exploring the wide world of gaming. Sharing stories with a vast audience, and entertaining children who perhaps spend much of their time alone, within their own head, as I did. That's ultimately what my game development is fueled by.” Q: What do you like best about the Yami team? A: “The Yami team really stands out to me solely based upon the fact that there is such a constant flow of communication. I've worked on a few teams before, even been part of the problem in them, in which you inevitably had to talk through a chain sequence of people to get clarification or instruction. Personally, I'm glad to be a part of a decent environment, where I feel as if forward progress is being made. You'd think with more people that would be evident, but it's really not.” Q: Tell us briefly about yourself! A: “I'm really not an about me type of person, honestly, ask anyone who knows me, they learned 'about me' by being around me for years, and still learn the most basic things sometimes years down the road. In terms of game development though, I've worked on five separate projects, have two ongoing, participated in one game jam, am participating in a second currently, and have been pursuing this field off and on for years. I have a wall of sticky notes with game design notes on them from my many projects, I can't throw them away because I'm never sure if they'll come up again later. I have a whiteboard, but I never erase it, so it's basically one big sticky note now itself. I love RPGs, I have fancied myself a writer, to about the same degree of success as a game developer, which means none so far! I am horrible at art, practicing, but it's nigh fruitless thus far, hopefully that changes over time! That's about all there is to know about me, at least that I am able to think of!” Q: What is something about coding that most people don’t know or understand? A: “Programming is not a difficult skill. It 'seems' difficult because of the syntax, because of higher level programmers min-maxing their code to be as efficient or as minimal as possible, but code can be as large as it takes to accomplish what you need. The act of programming is not hard, but it is a skill that you gradually improve at. I'm still a novice, my code is probably ugly and unclear as it gets, when it's just for me especially, but it'll function as I intended. There are certainly better ways to accomplish what I have, there are likely more 'adaptable' ways to do it as well, but it's functional. That's where programming begins. Once you can accomplish everything you can think to do in code, then you can expand upon those ideas, try fitting them in similar but not the same situations, update the code to see how you can morph it to work differently, but without destroying how it worked before. Clean it up, make it easy to read, make it easy to follow along with. Many bugs will make you just read through your code, following the logical path, trying to figure out where the issue could be: So if you are having trouble doing that, your code could use some maintenance!” ~Stay tuned for our next DevLog issue where we learn about another NPC in Yami as well as concept art of our game’s first boss! We will also be posting updates regarding our game’s website, which is coming soon to the public!~ Remember to: Connect with us on Social Media: Facebook: www.facebook.com/TumultuousProductions Twitter: https://twitter.com/TumultuousGame Join our Discord Server: Join the Yami Discord Want to Join the Project? Fill out our google forms Online Application For more about the Studio : About Us Tumultuous Productions Check out our website for Yami! https://tumultuousproductions.site/index2.html For more about Yami: Our Game: Yami
  3. [The original post with its formatting can be found at the Unity UI Profiling entry] You spend an infinite amount of time optimizing your Unity UI. But, all it takes to really screw up performance is a sneaky modification on a tiny attribute of an almost invisible Canvas UI element. And when that happens, not even Unity UI Profiling will save you from dropping frames. Are you ready for the road ahead? This is what happened in my last project... I worked hard to optimize the several UI panels of our port to Oculus Quest. This was mostly about reducing the overdraw level to an acceptable amount to make sure the GPU would be all comfy with the real 3D rendering. So I worked on Unity UI Optimization for at least a month and made pretty damn good progress. At some point, it was so well optimized that the GPU timings were barely moved by the UI. The opaque UI shading techniques I applied compensated most of the overdraw caused by UI Layering (elements drawn on top of other elements). There I was, with a super optimized hybrid UI system that effectively occluded the 3D elements drawn behind it. It became very easy to discard the rendering of these occluded fragments. However, I was far away from being done... When I hooked the Unity UI Profiler, one thing caught my attention. I saw an overwhelmed CPU taking over 1 ms per frame on UI rendering. That's a hell lot of time for a platform that gives you a budget of 13 ms for the whole game execution: physics, logic, 3D rendering, input, VR, networking are all in the same bucket. And I've seen cases where UI kills CPU performance even more. Unity UI: Expensive Build Batches And that is the thing: UI can be optimized to be GPU-friendly, but that doesn't directly translate into being CPU-performing. In fact, CPU and GPU have very different tasks to accomplish in Unity UI Rendering. No wonder, I suggest you approach CPU and GPU optimization very differently, as seen in my previous blog post about Unity UI Optimization. Doing more of Unity UI Profiling showed me the obvious problem: the UI was constantly being re-created every single frame, i.e. there was a Canvas Rebuild happening every frame. A constant hit of 1 ms on the CPU... ouch. But why would Unity do this to me? I thought Unity cached the UI Canvases... Actually yes, that is correct. Unity effectively caches the canvases to make sure they are built just once. The problem arises, though, when you change the properties of any of the UI elements of the canvas, such as a color, a position and so on. That means, all animations we love, such as button hover effects, are killing your performance and you might not know it. When UI property changes happen, Unity does the famous Canvas Rebuild that will crush your game's performance. A Unity UI Canvas Rebuild makes Unity iterate over all UI elements of that Canvas to generate an optimized list of draw calls (a set of vertices, colors, materials, etc.). And Canvas Rebuilds take longer than a Seat Panda doing a 0-60 mph test. That said, once you've acknowledged you suffered from constant UI Canvas Rebuilds, the natural question to make is... Why am I suffering the Canvas Rebuilds and what can I do about them? ​Answering that innocent question led me to spending 5+ hours researching this topic and empowering the Unity UI Profiler. Let's see how. Quick Navigation (they all redirect to the original blog page) 1. Unity UI Profiling: All Good, until... 2. Unity UI Profiling: A wild Canvas Rebuild appears! 3. Finding the Saboteur: a politically incorrect brute-force approach 4. Bonus: Augmenting the Unity Profiler for UI Optimization 1. Unity UI Profiling: All Good, until... Let's say we have a weirdo of a UI in front of us. That UI is barely doing anything but sitting there, being annoying to the player who just want to see something through it. As a collection of 350+ images using a Grid Layout Group, it (miserably) looks like this: Unity UI Profiling Example And that's fine, even if it contains 350+ images. They will normally be rendered in just two draw calls, as there are two unique images that are not atlased in a sprite atlas. Effectively, I can see in the profiler there's almost no overhead on the CPU side. Most of the time we're under 0.01ms, which is pretty damn good. Unity UI Profiling: Sneaky Spike (...Most of the time) ​Wait, what was that CPU spike at the end of the graph? 2. Unity UI Profiling: A wild Canvas Rebuild appears! What has just happened there at the end of the Unity Profile? The Unity UI CPU cost has more than doubled in just a second, how weird. I want to play a game Find the two differences in the samples below (you may want to click on them for zooming in). Unity UI Profiling: Cheap Canvas Unity UI Profiling: Canvas Rebuild I'll give you five seconds to find it out. 5, 4... Ok here's a hint to make it easier: Unity UI Profiling: Canvas Rebuild Overhead Yikes! PostLateUpdate.UpdateRectTransform and UGUI.Rendering.UpdateBatches really wanted to take all the highlight in today's show. What do these regions do? The first, UpdateRectTransform, implies that a transform of a specific object has changed, and therefore Unity has to run some expensive logic to keep visuals coherent. We don't know whether it was a position, a rotation, a scale or any other of the RectTransform properties. Heck, we don't even know if it was just one attribute or all of them. Was it one object, or multiple? In any case, which ones? This is the problem: we do not know. The second cost, UpdateBatches, relates to the fact that the whole Canvas geometry has to be rebuilt. This process is famously known as a Canvas Rebuild. A canvas rebuild implies that Unity goes through all the Canvas hierarchy to generate a list of draw calls, so to speak. The vertices, indices, colors, uv's of all elements are computed and then a batching pass is done to we merge as many draw calls as possible to reduce the CPU overhead of issuing them to the graphics driver. Now we know what's going on, kind of. We're on the right track. But how do we go about avoiding these canvas rebuilds? What is causing them? We just need to find out more specific information... Summary An attribute change in a UI element will mark the element itself as dirty A UI element can be totally dirty, but can also be partially dirty: vertices-dirty, layout-dirty, material-dirty. Partial dirty states are cheaper to recover from Unity will rebuild canvases entirely, as soon as any of its elements are marked as dirty Canvas rebuilds are expensive on the CPU, avoiding them is the key 3. Finding the Saboteur: a politically incorrect brute-force approach We are still to give an answer to the following question: Who's triggering that sucky Unity UI Canvas Rebuild? It turns out, there's no fast way of finding that out, especially if your canvas hierarchy is immense. But, to start out, I'll show you the brute force approach for finding the source of UI Canvas Rebuilds. 1. Keep the Unity UI Profiler recording Filter the metrics so you can focus on what is important: Rendering, Scripts, and UI. Keep an eye on the baseline to have a visual cue of your current baseline cost, which should include the expensive Canvas Rebuilds. 2. Deactivate UI Game Objects and compare Select a group of game objects and deactivate it. Compare the performance baseline. If the baseline didn't improve much, continue deactivating game objects till you see a significant improvement. 3. Find out who is modifying its properties Now you managed to isolate which object is triggering your Canvas Rebuilds. But, who's actually causing those? Is it a script scaling it? Or maybe an animation changing its position? It helps to do a right-click on the RectTransform and press "Find References in Scene" Once you know who's causing the UI canvas rebuilds, do something about it, such as disabling animations or transforms. Ruben, how am I supposed to follow this approach in a huge UI hierarchy? Don't give me crap I told you it was going to be neither fast nor fun, but your players asked for it. That's the thing. Having a huge hierarchy in place is not ideal in the first place. Exactly those massive, deep hierarchies will make your Canvas Rebuilds incredibly expensive on the CPU. But big and nested UI hierarchies can (and will) happen, so expect canvas rebuilds to hit you where it hurts the most: your players' game-play experience. While the brute force approach helps finding the source of canvas rebuilds, this does not scale in the long-run. Becoming more professional about optimizing UI is what got me into creating a tool that would give me all the answers I needed to match my players' expectations... Canvas Rebuild Profiling 4. Bonus: Augmenting the Unity Profiler for UI Optimization By now, hopefully, I stressed enough how frequent and impactful UI Canvas Rebuilds can be. These troll canvas rebuilds that infested my game stole 10% of my entire CPU budget! As we saw, there is a slow brute-force approach for finding the source of a canvas rebuild. Then, I hope you'll be able to do something about it, based on the strategies I posted on my Unity UI Optimization post (visit it, it's free, I promise!). But such as error-prone approach is a process a real guru would never settle for. You can literally spend days trying to avoid canvas rebuilds, but the moment you expect it the least, they'll come back just to disappear as soon as you attach the Unity UI Profiler. This becomes crucial if you're doing VR development. You don't want canvas rebuilds in your world-space UI. Like not at all. If you don't get rid of these, you're very much likely to convert your players into patients. I get it, I will get rid of the canvas rebuilds. But the Unity Profiler won't tell me much about those! What advice can you give me? I'm glad you asked. It turns out we can convince the Unity Profiler to give us useful information about who's messing with the performance of our UI. You and I can augment the functionality of the Unity UI Profiler. We do so by altering the Unity UI source code that is publicly available. Once you have the source code, you'll want to find the code functions where the Canvas Rebuilds take place. Then, all we need is some BeginSample and EndSample Profiler API magic. If you're running Unity 2019.1 or earlier, the Unity UI source code is available for free in their Bitbucket repository. You can follow their guide there to download, install and modify it. My suggestion? Use a newer Unity version, at least 2019.2.0. New versions of Unity include the UI source code by default, as the UI system is now part of the package manager. That's the hassle-free way of doing this. Here's a list of code regions I found during my investigations where you could add the Profiling API calls: CanvasUpdateRegistry.cs: function PerformUpdate Graphic.cs: function SetAllDirty Graphic.cs: other functions such as SetVerticesDirty, SetMaterialDirty, etc.. Unity UI: Profiling Source Code Useful? Yes. Artist/Designer-friendly? No. That's why I wrote a small open-source Unity Extension to enhance the Unity Profiler for you. The free tool will allow you to quickly switch over profiling modes to make sure the performance of your game is on top. The best part of the Unity Profiler enhancer? It just works outside of the editor, effectively replacing all the aspirins you've been taking while profiling your UI in Android and other platforms. Here it is, all its power under your control with two simple buttons: Buff my Unity Profiler Nerf my Unity Profiler. Grab it now here:
  4. Greetings, Its almost 4 AM in here, i am foreigner who lives in south Korea, married and i have also a stable job. i live in Seoul, and i am looking for a serious group that willing to design and develop a game as a hobby. I am kinda dead serious about it. I made a game but its far form being finished, because lack of ideas and code lines. I am looking for group of friends who live in south Korea and are willing to sit down, have a coffee, discuss ideas, and start bringing these ideas to life. (Online, Offline, card or mobile) game. I am good with Unity3d, and a good painter and illustrator, furthermore experienced with WACOM tabs. Many games started from a garage by a small groups of developers, and now they reached the sky with their dreams and ideas. Please contact me or comment here, if your passion fall in this direction. Here is couple of screenshots of the project i am working on. called "chronicles of SORFIA"
  5. Looking for a 2D artist to make with me a top-down game with cool features, guns, spells, and powerups. I'm a programmer, and I already made the code for the guns, different spells, powerups and basic mechanics like shooting and moving and stuff like that. I just don't have any assets to use so I'm looking for 1-2 2D artists, can be a pixel artist or anything that you want. Compensation will be 50% for you and 50% for me if we are only 2 and will be different if we are gonna be a trio, you are not working for me (or volunteering) we are a team. The only thing that I control and you not is the money, but you can argue with me and I will probably give you the amount that you think that you deserve. It doesn't have a name yet, we will decide about the name together. You can create guns with no coding because of a system that I created so you will also be able to create content for the game, besides ideas and art. I really need an artist so if you are interested please contact me in discord: #1615Cringey Boy I will leave a video to see the game and also the build to try and actually play the game that I have right now. I don't have any art so it looks bad (; https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1Na3JKPBYXuUpxtP-lBUO-hIl0xO1ujSj?usp=sharing < this is the build, just download the folder called "Dungeon" and in there press on Dungeon.exe to open the game. Controls: 1. Switch to the main gun 2. Switch to the secondary gun Mouse Left Click. Shoot (you also aim with the mouse) R. Reload the gun that you are holding. E. Use main spell (currently, fireball which explodes and deals damage. And you also aim that with the mouse) Q. Use secondary spell (currently, heal aura which heals you pretty fast. You don't need to aim) (In the video there is no restart but in the build, there will be a restart button when you die) Desktop 2019.10.21 - 20.55.18.02.mp4 Desktop 2019.10.21 - 20.55.18.02.mp4 )
  6. RoKabium Games

    Track Ray fossil

    From the album: SAMA

    On Aura you can find the Track Ray fossilized bones usually split up in 6 parts. This extinct reptile was incredibly colourful and was one of the largest land animals ever to have inhabited this cold planet. It is speculated that the thick feathers and scales were good insulators for the cold and the colour was most likely a display to attract mates.
  7. My project started in 2014 but recently ended due to no funds. AltarisNine was a Minecraft project based on RPG. The concept was nine islands that you explore at a time to follow an in depth lore based on our own production team. This is where the 'Nine' comes in. With skepticism of future success we hope to make this tale into chapters. Such as the first one introducing Nine islands at time. It wasn't always the same though, my world did evolve over time and now I have a better idea of what it is better than ever. In the first island, Main Isle, is themed around jungles and wilderness. There's lore that stretches throughout the chapter which will engage the player. There would also be kinds of characters you can be such as any other RPG which could be talked about (because i'm still about what I have lol) My former team was designing a world players would get into interact with in various ways. Boss battles would be minigames and the RPG lore would be engaged in and something indie platforms would enjoy and talk about beyond platforms. In the minecraft varient I was a builder, the leader, and the story director which everyone respected. I led my own team of builders and story writers. While I chose certain individuals to be the head department of development and art design. The reason I am here is to find a new team to help take this away from minecraft and hope we can be successful about it. I'll happily commute each and every person that volunteers and will be accommodated down the line with promotions, wages, and definitely praised for helping start my dream up. Here are some questions that were frequently asked and that I can thoroughly answer: What is the goal of the game? If you've ever heard of Wizard101. I got inspired by that game a little. I like the concept of making yourself in this world of mystery and impressing people with new mechanics and events that they enjoy. I'd like for the game to be successful and be mostly on PC but if this keeps up we could reach out to other consoles. But for now, PC, one platform at a time lol. My goal personally is to give people the entertainment and enjoyment I think they'll deserve. Something thats not cheesy, not cliche, something new to keep evolving the gaming community Is this in first-person or third-person? This will be a third person game. We can play around with the camera angles but I kind of want it from a aerial pov I saw RPG in the post so can I assume that the game will have generic RPG elements, e.g. quests, npcs, story-line, items? Yes this will have generic RPG elements. But with a few surprises that make the game different. Such as making boss fights some type of minigame. I don't know how the audience will like or even if it'll flow with game play. But I'd still like to take the idea on for now. Will there be combats, e.g. vs. monsters, vs. players(?) ? There will be tons of concepts. As i've said before the 'Nine' comes in the Nine isles of this world we haven't named yet lol. Each nine islands we come up with will not only give players plenty of content to play, but something we break up into story chapters. Each island will have its on set monsters tied to the story or even monsters that are just natural in their environment. There will also be a PvP aspect which can't be brought up too much because its difficult to try to come up with a player style culture that isn't too predictable or generic or even cliche. I was wondering if it should be an initiated fight or a head on duel like world of warcraft. Is this a single player game or a multiplayer one? Definitely multiplayer. Will the game look like Minecraft? like a voxel/blocks game? I imagined it not looking like minecraft but maybe that can be a concept of its own down the line (like an island concept). I was thinking along the lines of a 3D style and not like minecraft. What are the core mechanics to be included, e.g. player movement, enemy movement, enemy AI? This question is more technical but there will be interactive things in the world, things to collect, natural occurring crafting supplies to make new loot and weapons with. There will be NPC's and thats a broad topic enough lol. I'd even a imagine a pet, housing, and gardening system. But thats for accessories in coding and to give more content in the game for later polishing. Is there a storyline already made? There is an indirect storyline. We've made a script for voice actors (and just what to make the NPC's say in general) in A9 v1. Are there goals already planned out? There are many goals to set out. One each at a time for separate upcoming departments The first 8 pictures were of our hub, the other 9 was our factions world. The factions world doesn't retain to this project I wanted you to see how dedicated I was to making this project. I built everything in the hub myself except for the giant pagodas. The last two photos were all the ones I could find of the RPG world
  8. Welcome to our twenty-seventh blog post! In this one, we wanted to begin to delve into a specific topic of combat, which are enemy armies. Combat overall in this game can get fairly overwhelming, and difficult to keep track of. But not impossible. One of the ways we wish to emphasize that plausibility revolves around basic combat. We can begin to push what is possible and what isn’t be simply placing more and more foes to be fought. This game is highly based around its combat, after all, so putting that at the forefront is our core design choice. It becomes something that isn’t so simple- its not a boss fight, nor is it statically generated. It is completely random. You’re forced to fluidly follow the world and react to things as they come at you. Which we believe pushes the challenge and design more. As we get even further along, we imagine you’ll be tasked with facing a great many of foes. And, given your training at the earlier stages, you should be amply equipped in dealing with it. It all comes back to our core design we wish for the game- your army clashing against an opponent’s army. Results can go a variety of ways- you can have your entire force wiped out from under you, or perhaps you escape with only a few injures. Or only a single warrior dies. Or you escape completely unscathed, and able to press onward. Maybe a difficult foe blocks your way, so you look for an alternative route. These are things you’ll need to deal with as you improve your control and understanding of the warriors you command. Your soldiers will take damage, consume mana, be positioned incorrectly, die, so on and so forth, and as you fight against these multitudes of foes, you’ll begin to see the importance of dividing your focus so all warriors get the attention they need, evenly. Equally as importantly, you’ll learn to fight with the various disadvantages outlined above, and hone your skills further. Lastly, these designs are not completely unfair. Your progress is retained as you traverse. So, even while you may be faced with a very difficult task, just know the reward is said progress that you will not be forced to repeat. --- Thank you for viewing our post! Support and interest for the project has been rapidly growing ever since we began posting here, and we're incredibly grateful for all the wonderful feedback so far! We hope this project interests you as much as we love developing for it, and please look forward to more updates coming in the very near future! If you’re brand new, consider checking out our trailer and overall description of the game here.
  9. [The original post was published with its original formatting in The Gamedev Guru's Blog] Heya, Unity Addressables fan. Last week, I posted a short but powerful article detailing three ways Unity Addressables can help you developing better games. The article was very well received, thanks for your active participation. Just at the end of that post, you were given the chance to test your knowledge in Unity Addressables through a short quiz. The goal I had in mind when creating the quiz was to help you become aware of the areas you might be less familiar with, so you can get to develop your skills where you need the most. I'll confess that, initially, I didn't expect many people to go through the quiz. After all, quizzes can be daunting and, as usual, there's this extra babbling coming from me. But to my surprise, the quiz results well outperformed my expectations. I'm really happy to see that so many people accepted the challenge. You all rock! I got some interesting statistics out of the quiz. Here are some figures I wanted to share with you: The greatest part of the people who started it, about 80%, actually were determined enough to finish it The average score was about 12, which is pretty damn good for an API that was only introduced recently Less than 5% of the quiz participants fell in the Troll Guru rank About 50% are part of the Apprentice Guru group Over 40% of the participants scored enough to be Enlightened Gurus But only 5% made it to be considered The Final Boss Guru So, congratulations if you were part of the quiz experience! And independently from the score you got, I am sure it will not take you much effort to reach the production-level required score of 20+. I'll be helping you along the path. In this post, I will explain the most interesting challenges posed in the quiz. Some answers might differ depending on your particular context, so make sure to comment at the end of the post if you had a complementary experience. If you didn't complete the quiz before, do it now before reading further. Do not cheat. I'll know. What were your results? Are you a Troll Guru, an Apprentice Guru, an Enlightened Guru or The Final Boss Guru? Share your results in the comments section. Trusting that you finished it, let's have a look at the questions and some of the answers. The format should be self-explanatory, but I admit I could have chosen less cheesy graphics for it— yes, that's me. Question 1: Intense Memory Pressure An angry player leaves a 1-star review because your game uses too much memory. You... Answer in public, telling the player to upgrade their device and then come back This is a popular answer somehow. As much as we might feel like answering this, chances are, we have been too busy (or lazy) to implement a proper architecture. Blaming players for playing with a brick-phone won't get us more sales, so a better strategy is to fix our mess. Switch to a more advanced texture compression method, e.g. ETC2 to ASTC This is helpful and you should indeed switch to more advanced compression methods, where possible. But this solution will only take you so far. You'll get moderate gains in memory usage and texture quality, but they'll not be enough to cover your memory pressure issues. Split your scenes into sub-scenes, so less content is loaded in memory In general, sub-scenes used to be a good solution. I've used them in the past with great success. However, if you are having bad reviews already, chances are it is too late to introduce such a massive change in the architecture of your game. Better to look somewhere else. Implement an asset lazy-loading mechanism through AssetReferences Over 75% of people agreed on this, that's great. AssetReferences are likely to give you the biggest gain for the buck. The migration to this workflow is usually straight-forward and much easier than the other alternatives. However, be aware that, in some cases, it might be hard to work around the asynchronous requirements of the Unity Addressables API. Question 2: Endless Loading Times You press the play button. By the time your in-game scene is loaded, your coffee is cold. You... Blame the artists and ask them to put every texture into atlases. Also, you buy a faster PC 10% of the subscribers chose this one. I love you guys. Reduce the texture size globally, so asset loading is much faster. You don't submit these meta file changes in your versioning system I've done this a few times recently. It works. However, the pay to price is high. Your versioning system might go nuts and your changelists will be full of garbage. This is indeed hard to manage, as if you ignore these temporal texture import settings modifications, the real changes will mostly go unnoticed and won't be submitted. Create custom scenes that contain just the functionality you are working on Creating sub-scenes for faster iterations might be a possibility for your game, but in my experience, they tend to be left unmaintained. With time, they break and one might spend more time fixing them than the gain you eventually had back then. Consider implementing sub-scenes only if you don't see these problems in your project. Remove direct references and add indirect references instead, so only the required assets are loaded Indirect references for the winner. Direct references will implicitly ask Unity to load all their content as soon as the script holding them is instantiated. Indirect references, however, gives you full control over the when/how/what. That means, you can delay loading until you need it, if at all, saving you from unnecessary loading times and wasted memory. Question 3: What Play Mode Script? You are currently implementing materials for your new characters. You want to try Addressables, so in the Play Mode script section of Addressables, you select... Fast Mode: we want it always fast, after all