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Found 890 results

  1. 3dBookman

    The 3D book

    After a break of several years the 3D book project is back on. A few short words now on what this blog is about. I have to deliver my wife to the bus station in a few minutes, then a week alone so may have the time then to explain things. But the 3D book is something I started in 014 and put several years into, then the break, now on again. A win32 app with a text window and an ogl window. I just remembered I had something written on this so here it is I write to see if anyone in this community of game developers, programmers, enthusiasts, may be interested in a project I have been developing[off and on] for several years now. So follows a short description of this project, which I call the 3D-Book project. The 3D-Format Reader: A new format of media. Imagine opening a book, the left page is conventional formatted text - on the right page a 3D animation of the subject of the text on the left hand page. The text page with user input from mouse and keyboard, the 3D page with user intput from a game pad. An anatomy text for a future surgeon, with the a beating heart in 3D animation. A childrens story adventure book with a 3D fantasy world to enter on the right page. ... Currently 3D-Format Reader consists of a C++ Windows program: Two "child" windows in a main window frame. Two windows: a text-2D rendering window and a 3D-rendering window. The text-2D window, as its' name implies, displays text and 2D graphics; it is programmed using Microsoft's DirectWrite text formatting API and Microsoft's Direct2D API for 2D graphics. The 3D-rendering window uses the OpenGL API. A 3DE-Book page is formatted in one of two possible modes: DW_MODE or GL_MODE. In GL_MODE both windows are shown; the text-2D rendering window is on the left and the 3D OpenGL window is on the right. In DW_MODE, only the text-2D rendering window is shown, the OpenGL window is hidden (Logically it is still there, it has just been given zero width). The 3D-Format Reader reads text files, which consists of the text of the book, control character for the formatting of text, (bold, underline, ...), display of tables, loading of images(.jpg .png ...), and control of 2D and 3D routines. 3D-Reader programming is based on a Model-View-Controller (MVC) architecture. The MVC design is modular: The Controller component handles user input from the operating system , the Model component processes the input, and the View component sends output back to the user on the display. Typical Parent-Child windows programs have multiple "call back" window procedures(winProcs): One for the parent window and one for child window. The MVC model, simplifies message routing by using a call-back window procedure which receives Windows messages for the main window, the text-2D window and the OGL window. A sample MVC program by Song Ho Ahn was used as a template for the 3DE-Reader. Rushed for time now, so a hasty sign off and thanks for reading. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 8 - 21 -18 I spent the last few days working on procedural mesh generation. First looking to find a bit of code to do what I had in mind. Which begs the question: What was did I have in mind? I just wanted a cube mesh generator such that... Input: An integer n = units from origin to cube face. Output: The vertices for a unit cube centered on the origin. With 8n² triangles per cube face. In clockwise winding order ready for the rendering pipeline. Screenshot of some cubes generated with the procedural cube mesh generator. BELOW IS DRAFT TO BE EDITED Output for a unit cube centered on the origin: input (n = number of verts per edge) output 6nsquared verts in clockwise order for the faces of the cube. Maybe input a flag the inside vs the outside faces. I did not want to hand code a single vertex and did not want to load a mesh file. I am sure the code is out there somewhere, but was not finding it. So, a bit reluctantly at first, I started coding the mesh generator. And I started enjoying creating this thing and stopped searching for the "out there somewhere" code; although still curious how others did this. First question: How to number the verts? It would be great to concieve of some concise algorithm to put out the verts for 12nsquared triangles all in clockwise order for the outside faces of the cube directly. It would be great to have an Eulerian math mind also. I decided to just use a simple nested loop to generate the cube face verts and number in the order they were produced. Then the problem becomes: Find an algorithm that reorders the verts output by the nested loop to a list of clockwise ordered triangles(looking from the outside of the cube) to cover the six faces of the cube. And that required deciding on a pattern to cover the faces. Instead of just choosing some arbitrary pattern I choose to look at the order of the verts coming out of the nested loop algorithm on the first face output. The loop put out the verts one face at a time, using a small(n = 5) cube with just 25 verts/face; hoping this would suggest a pattern for the triangles. To see how all this worked you really need to look at the image. The image composite Cube.png The first face to come out of the loops is in the upper left corner of the image. There are 25 verts for the face(0 thru 24). Thru a bit of trial and error the 32 triangles(T0 - T31) were ordered as shown. Now we have an ordered list of the triangles and the verts from our loop. T0 = 0 5 6 T1 = 6 1 0 T2 = 1 6 7 T3 = 7 2 1 T4 = 2 7 8 T5 = 8 3 2 T6 = 3 8 9 T7 = 9 4 3 T8 = 5 10 11 If we can find a pattern in the verts on the right side of this list; we can implement it in an algorithm and the rest is just coding. Pattern recognition: T2 = T0 with 1 added to each component T3 = T1 with 1 added to each component And in general T[n+2] = T[n] with 1 added to each component, until we come to T8. even T[n] = n/2 + n/2s, s + 1 + n/2 + n/2s, s + 2 + n/2 + n/2s. odd T[n] = Procedural Cube This routine creates a cube centered on the origin. It takes an integer input g, which determines the number of vertices output for the six faces of the cube. The six faces are on the six planes defined by x = +g x = -g y = +g y = -g z = +g z = -g. The eight corners of the cube are (+g,+g,+g), (-g,+g,+g), (+g,-g,+g), (+g,+g,-g), (-g,-g,+g), (-g,+g,-g), (+g,-g,-g), (-g,-g,-g), This determines s, the edge of the cube s = 2g. The number of verticies/face is therefore (s + 1)². The number of triangles/face is 2s² The number of triangles/cube is 12s². So for an input of g = 5 we have cube of side 10 with 1200 triangles and 3600 verticies generated. Implementation: First we use three nested loops to create vertices for the six faces. Psuedocode for(number of faces) for(
  2. Trivia Quiz: All about everything! - this is an exciting intellectual game that allows you to learn a lot about the world and improve your IQ. Especially useful quiz will be for students and pupils - it allows you to learn more than tell in the classroom, as well as help to test your knowledge! Choose your favorite theme and test yourself in different quiz modes! You can choose from one to four topics of questions or all at once! Play in Steam: Trivia Quiz in Steam To your taste, the game has a wide range of topics: - Geography - here you can test yourself on the knowledge of countries, capitals, flags, continents, volcanoes, mountains, lakes and other things. - IT - if you know all about computers and technology, then you here. - Amazing nearby - find out the most-the most on the planet: the biggest, the longest, the most unusual, the smallest and other amazing facts. - Biology - test yourself on the knowledge of biology from cells to animals and humans. - Space - all about the planets, their satellites, galaxies and the conquest of space! - Chemistry - is a topic for those who know chemical formulas not only of water and alcohol, but also understand the structure of elements) - Mathematics - answer questions on mathematical formulas, famous scientists-mathematicians and various definitions. - History - do you like to study dates and key events in the world history? Do you know who Alexander the great, Napoleon and Kutuzov are? Then you here! The game has several modes: 1. Game on time (Classic, Until the last) 2. Free play (Classic, Until the last) 3. Try your luck 4. Survival 5. Survival for a time 6. Campaign Mode For streamers, we have a special option that allows your channel's subscribers to vote online for one of the answer options during the game. If you use this option, you can contact us and we will provide you with everything you need. This feature makes the stream much more interactive and fun! For you there are Achievements and a rating of Knowledge Leaders. With each update we will add questions on existing topics and create new topics! Soon we will add themes: - Physics
  3. Geri

    Anime Maker

    Anime Maker is an ultimately simple and but powerfull crossplatform software to create animated cartoons and anime.Download your favorite anime fanworks (characters, backgrounds) from internet, then open them with Anime Maker to create an Anime from them!Anime Maker offers shot based timeline management with 27 image layers, simple BONE ANIMATION for moving your heroes, dozens of effect including fire, water, snowfall, fountain, and refraction. Make your own anime for amatheur or professional movie competitions! Create your own ultimate fanfictions from your favorit anime, impress your friends, create your own anime seasons for televisions, or video sharing sites! Your career as an anime artist starts today! Anime Maker offers all the feature that required to create an anime, including the folowing: - Time-line and shot based video edition with copy/paste/delete abilities - Support for bmp, jpg, png formats with alpha map, and automatic alpha-map generation - 27 independent graphics layer to create your movie - 3 sound channel on the timeline - Wav and ogg files for audio - Mouse and touchscreen for input - AVI video export with antialiasing - x86 and ARM based computers and mobile phones - Windows, Linux and Android compatibility - 8 invididual bones on all layers, with 4 joints each - Real time motion movement recording for realible animation - Dozens of fire and particle effects with your own textures - Layer refraction effects (water waves, etc) - Anime Maker supports multiple CPU cores for great performance - Dedicated mouth speak layer management - More stable than video software usually - Very small memory footprint, and powersaving - Ability to morph, move, resize, color, blend your layers in real-time - WYSIWYG editor: what you see is what you will get on export - Supports cutting exported video into multiple files - Tooltips as easy usage guide - Instant start and quit - Multimedia cacheing to avoid memory waste - 16:9 ratio with custom shot sizes optimized for Anime - Colored and shadowed subtitles download: http://AnimeMaker.tk http://gerigeri.uw.hu/animemaker/index.html
  4. Introducing Jumpaï! A game made using LibGDX. It's been 21 months the game is in development and we just released version 0.3! It's an online game, there's a server running at http://jumpai.net/ and everyone can join! Registering is easy, username password and you are good.The point of the game is to make your own level! There's an easy to use, integrated editor allow you to make your levels and they same automatically on the cloud. You can then join them online to play with your friends. A lot of cool mechanics, portals, powerups, items... Check it out! Trailer: Also, you can join us on discord https://discord.gg/R4ZafEw Screenshots:
  5. Tape_Worm

    Gorgon v3 – Animation

    I got the rework of the animation system for v3 done and up on the git hubs. Naturally, I took this awesome video of it. It’s a music video. But not just any music video. A very bad, cheesy 80’s music video (the best kind). Of course, the music is metal \m/ (done, very poorly, by yours truly). Anyway, that’s all. View the full article
  6. Hornok Tibor

    Lack of idea for background

    Hello! I new for game developing and to gamedev.net. I hope somebody can point me to the right direction. I developing a vertical shoot em' up and I want to make some non-traditional backgrounds. I want to make something like hyperspace but more cartoonish and colorful, and of course in top-down. i can't find any good example, so if any of you know any way to get good inspiration to make it, thanks!
  7. Hello everyone, Who are you and what is this about? We are a team of two working on a Dungeon Based Turn-Based RPG that features a unique combat system and creative mechanics that bring the story to life. How far along are you? The engine the game will be using (which is built on top of Unity) is about 85% done so we felt this would be the best time to get others involved as we don't want to have you waiting too long to see something playable. What's your release plan? The plan is to release the first episode (three dungeons) for free on PC and Xbox (through the creators program) this holiday. This first episode is for us to test the fun aspect of the game mechanics, establish a name and generate a buzz. We're basically experimenting with releasing a game that we would love to play and would love for you join us. This game is part of a universe that we'd been planning for years and felt this would be the best intro to it and also the best way to polish our tools and knowledge. Depending on how the first episode is released will be received, and if you've joined the team and would love to take things up a notch, we can all sit down and discuss how to move to a full game. Who are you looking for? We are currently working with voice actors on the story, dialogue and voices for the full first episode. We are currently talking to a few music composers that are interested in collaborating on the game, but nothing has been finalized yet. If you're interested, please let us know. We are looking for artists for: Backgrounds: We are looking at something similar to Megaman X6 style of backgrounds. Character Portraits: The game is heavy on story, fully voice acted as well. For dialogues, we are looking at having the characters portraits pop up next to the dialogue with a few emotions. Think Persona style? Character Sprites: These are the characters as seen in the level and combat as well as mini bosses, etc. Looking for going Megaman X6 style here. Level Assets and Battle Assets: Again Megaman X6 Style ... But you already knew that. Final words? We are super excited to finally see this come to life and while we're doing all of this currently unpaid, we feel it'd be a great side project and a fun game that will be trying something unique. And of course we'd love to meet all of you and make new friend along the way. If you're interested or have any questions or concerns, please feel free to reply to the topic or reach out to us. Looking forward to hearing from you
  8. .I work with professionnals (books, game) and I have a great experience with individual commissionners since three years. My prices are very reasonable. You can check my portfolio here: bradyrain.artstation Skype: Brady Rain Facebook: https: www.facebook.com/dmitri.veselyi We can negotiate the prices. Feel free to contact me and discuss about the project. Regards, Dmytro Veseliy.
  9. Hey there, I'm very new to this forum so i have no idea, if someone has the time to help me out a bit. So.. I'm working on a Kingdom Hearts Game. I nearly finished the Engine of the Game, but i need to make more sprites and animations for the characters. The Game will not be that long or have a real story, i just planned to make all Organisation Battles from Kingdom Hearts II in 2D graphics. The Gameplay will be like KH2 or other Kingdom Hearts Titles. You will be able to change your start conditions like you want (for Example: Lvl 1, Critical & No Experience or Lvl 99, Beginner etc). You will have Items, Abilities, Spells and you can customize shortcuts like in Kingdom Hearts II. I'm open to ideas and suggestions. If you are interested in this Project and want to help me out with sprites, pls PM me. I really need help and if it's done i will buy ice-cream to everyone who helped me I will include a few Screenshot that you can picture what it will look like and if you help i will send you a Demo-Version ^^ And sorry for my bad English Thank you for your attention i forgot to say the sprites and graphics that are actually in the game will not be the graphics that will be in the finished version
  10. Dmitry Veseliy

    Bradys Art

    I would like see you on my artstation. Have a look at my paintings. Hope you enjoy it and thank you a lot for you time and support. You can check my portfolio here: bradyrain.artstation Skype: Brady Rain Facebook: https: www.facebook.com/dmitri.veselyi Feel free to contact me and discuss about any project. Regards, Dmytro Veseliy.
  11. Hello! My name is Tania. Im from Kiev Ukraine and Im an artist. I have lots of free time and a big desire to be a part of a team that working on a game. I draw for the last three years. I draw on my tablet and Im working basically in Photoshop. I speak well English so we will not gonna have problems with language barrier. I can work in different styles and do different type of art - occlusions - character design - icons Write me - onethousandartist@gmail.com You can find my works on - https://www.behance.net/cherepachkf7da
  12. Hi guys, I've been learning to make my SDL reusable framework from the book SDL game development (image below). And now I'm trying to understand the ScrollingBackground (page 206 - creating Alien attack) but I still haven't figured out the meaning of the code. If someone finished this book please show me a more specific meaning, idea of the code (sorry for my bad english)
  13. cfrankb

    sample0001.png

    From the album: LGCK Builder

    © Francois Blanchette

  14. cfrankb

    7.jpg

    From the album: LGCK Builder

    © Francois Blanchette

  15. cfrankb

    6.jpg

    From the album: LGCK Builder

    © Francois Blanchette

  16. cfrankb

    5.jpg

    From the album: LGCK Builder

    © Francois Blanchette

  17. cfrankb

    4.jpg

    From the album: LGCK Builder

    © Francois Blanchette

  18. cfrankb

    3.jpg

    From the album: LGCK Builder

    © Francois Blanchette

  19. cfrankb

    2.jpg

    From the album: LGCK Builder

    © Francois Blanchette

  20. cfrankb

    0001.png

    From the album: LGCK Builder

    © Francois Blanchette

  21. cfrankb

    1.jpg

    From the album: LGCK Builder

    © Francois Blanchette

  22. I've created a HTML5 2D canvas game and I'm now ready to take the step and convert it to a native Android (and iOS) app. The game works perfectly fine in any desktop or mobile browser. Animations are fast and smooth. After some research, I decided Cordova was the way to go to create native apps for Android and iOS. My first priority is Android, simply because I have an Android phone myself and I don't have a Mac (which apparently is required to build iOS apps). I have looked at Cocoon.io and although that might be an even better option than Cordova (since it's actually build on top of Cordova), the thing that made me run from it is the fact that it costs $500 just to remove the "build with Cocoon" splash screen... After installing all prerequisites (cordova, Android Studio, nodes.js) building my first APK was easy. When I ran my game in the Android emulator, the game was abysmally slow... Testing it on my device yielded the same slow results. After searching the internet, I figured it was because on some devices, an old and slow WebView is used by native apps to display HTML5 content. Still strange since my phone uses Android 7.0.0 and the emulator uses Android 8.0.0... I quickly found FastCanvas, a PhoneGap/Cordova plugin that adds a very fast canvas "compatible" rendering surface. But it was last updated in 2013 and after trying to get it to work for almost 16 hours straight, I came to the conclusion there's no way to get this to work with the current version of Cordova. I then found CrossWalk-WebView. This too was pretty old and a pain to get it to work with the current version of Cordova. And when I did get it to work, I quickly found out it created a few new problems making my game unplayable (noticeably a strange lag when touching the screen. Not the famous 300ms input lag, but after touching the screen, the entire game would freeze for 200ms-300ms). So I had to give up on Crosswalk as well. So now I am at a loss. Can anyone offer me suggestions on how to speed up canvas rendering in Cordova? It's pretty darn frustrating that my HTML5 game is finished and I'm ready for publication, only to find out that's not as easy everyone says it is... (BTW, I've posted the same question on a few other forums to reach as many game developers as possible.)
  23. Classically, people would recommend beginning game programming with C++ and DirectX, but due to their complicatedness, it's not so easy to create even a 2D-game with these two tools, let alone 3D-games. So quite often, we'll see people use a lot of 3rd party libraries imported to Visual Studio, and these libraries are quite happy to create a lot of warnings when compiled, which isn't so beautiful. A few months ago, while playing a mini-game of WeChat's "mini program", I found it simple enough, yet quite amazing! And later I learned it was created by JavaScript. Now I want to learn this new language, but I wonder if it is a right approach to creating 2D-, even 3D-games. By "right", I don't mean I want it to create complex games, but just to help me learn and understand the basics of creating a mini game.
  24. Hi, I want to present my game called "Stick Bunny" – arrcade game in which you have to help Bunny to go from one platform to another. Download from here: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.threemgames.stickbunny Youtube video gameplay: Funny Bunny wants to go from one platform to another. Use stick and help Bunny. Stick can increase the length. Be careful, if the stick is too long Bunny will be knocked and if it is too short Bunny will fall down. Try to go as far as you can. Collect carrots and exchane them for new characters of Bunny. Tap the screen to change size of the stick. Are you ready to reach 100 platforms or mayby you want to go even farther? So tap the screen, join platforms with sticks, and collect carrots. It is FREE! I am waiting for your comments. Please, give me feedback. If you notice any bugs please tell me. Thanks !
  25. Ruslan Sibgatullin

    Seven Tips for Starting Game Developers

    Originally posted on Medium Well, it’s been a ride. My first game Totem Spirits is now live. I’m not gonna tell you how awesome the game is (since you may try it yourself :) ). Instead I want to share my own experience as a developer and highlight some useful tips for those interested in game development. First of all, short background information about myself — I’m 26 now and have about 22 years of a game playing experience (yes, that’s right the first games I played at age 3–4, one of them was Age of Empires) and slightly more than three years of professional career as a Java developer. Alright, let’s dive into the topic itself now. There are seven tips I’ve discovered while creating the game: 1. The team is the main asset. Yes, even the smallest game dev studios have a team of a few people. I literally give a standing ovation to those guys who are able to create a whole game product only by themselves (I know only one example of such). In my team there were one artist, one UX-designer\artist, one sound designer, and myself — programmer\game designer\UX-designer. And here comes the first tip: you should tip 1: Delegate the work you are not qualified in to the professionals. Just a few examples why: Firstly, I tried to find the sounds myself, spent a few days on it and ended up with a terrible mix of unsuitable and poorly created sound samples. Then, I found a guy who made a great set of sounds for less than $15. The first version of promo video was, well, horrible, because I thought I’m quite good at it. Fortunately, I met an UX-designer who made this cool version you may find at the beginning of this post. I can see now why there are so many, let’s say, strange-looking games with horrible art assets and unlistenable music. Well, you just can’t have the same level of professionalism in everything. 2. Game development is not free. You would have to spend your time or\and your money. I mean, if you want to create a good-looking and playable product you need to invest in it. To be honest, I think that not each and every product out there in the markets can be called a “Game”, since many of them are barely playable. As for my game I’ve spend about $1200 on the development and slightly more than 2 years of my life. Still think that it’s worth every penny and every minute, since I gained a lot of experience in programming which boosted my professional career. tip 2: Take it seriously, investments are necessary. 3. Respect the product. The development process is painful, you will want to quit several(many)times. But if the game you’re building is the one you would enjoy playing yourself it would make the process more interesting and give it additional meaning. The third tip is my main keynote. tip 3: Build a game you would want to play yourself. 4. Share it with the closest friends and relatives, BUT… tip 4: …choose beta-testers wisely. If you don’t want to pay extra money for professional testers then friends\colleagues\relatives are gonna be the first ones to test the game. Try to find what kind of games they like since probably not each of them represents your target audience. And I suggest sharing the product not earlier that in the “beta” stage — otherwise you would need to explain a lot of game rules and that would harm the user experience and you gain almost nothing useful out of it. 5. Make use of your strengths. It will cost you less if you know how to code or how to create an assets. In my case, I didn’t need to hire a programmers or game designers. No one is able to implement your idea better than you, that’s why I suggest to tip 5: Take as many roles in the project as possible. But do not forget about the tip 1. 6. Don’t waste too much time on planning. No, you still need to have some kind of a roadmap and game design document, just tip 6: Make documentation flexible. You would probably need to change it many times. In my case a lot of great ideas had come during the development process itself. And don’t be afraid to share your ideas within a team and listen to their ideas as well! 7. You will hate your game at some point. That may sound sad, but that’s true. After a ten-thousandth launch you just hate the game. You may be tempted to start a new “better”, “more interesting”, etc. project at that point, but, please, tip 7: Don’t give up! Make it happen. Share the game with the world since you’ve put a lot of effort into it. Those tips I’ve discovered mostly for myself and more than sure that for a game industry giants the list above may sound like a baby talk. Nevertheless I still think it might be useful for those dreaming to create the best game ever.
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