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Found 134 results

  1. New Here So...HI all

    Hey all im Norvik i really like games but recently want to create them yes i know it takes a lot of people to make a single game but right now im just focusing on the 3d aspect of it i tried c# i kinda understood a bit of it but it didnt catch my attention right now im doing 3d work in Blender and later on i would like to at least prototype my ideas into Unity the thing is i think i hate coding and the other day i saw something called Uscript (visual Scripting) can someone tell me if thats a good way to go ?
  2. I am a beginner in the Game Dev business, however I plan to build a futuristic MMO with some interesting mechanics. However, I have some doubts about shooting mechanics that I chose for this game and would like to know your opinion on this. The mechanic goes as follows: - Each gun would have it's damage-per-shot value - Each gun would have it's shots-per-second value - Each gun would have it's accuracy rating Now the question is: how to calculate the output damage? I have three available options: 1) Calculate the chance of each shot hitting the target (per-shot accuracy) 2) Multiply the damage output of a weapon by it's accuracy rating (weapon with 50% accuracy deals 50% of it's base damage) 3) Don't use accuracy at all and just adjust the weapon damage output Which of these three mechanics would you like to see in a game? Mind, this will be an MMO game, so it will have lock-on targets, AoE effects and all that jazz.
  3. I am thinking of making a game like screeps, where you use actual programming to control the game, but I'm not sure about the best way to do this. I'm probably going to use lua or javascript for the language, and I would like to represent units in the game as objects that the user can command and modify, with restraints based on the actual game, like how screeps does it. However, I am not sure how to get started. I think I have to use C or C++ and then embed the languages, but I'm not sure where to go from there, for example, having objects in lua actually correspond to units in the game. Are there any resources that explain how to do this? Also, I'm not concerned about the graphics of the game whatsoever, it might as well just be a text adventure as far as I'm concerned, I just want the user to be able to control the game through scripting.
  4. I'm looking to create some kind of simulation like game similar to rimworld and dwarf fortress. I would also like to include a way to control units through programming, similar to screeps, I'm even thinking of using JavaScript as well. I would like the graphics to be separate from the actual game, so that people can make their own if they don't like the default on (the game will be open source). Are there any languages or engines that would be good for this task? I mostly program in functional languages like racket, but I know some python, Java, and JavaScript. I know how to use unity somewhat, but I'm not sure that it would be best for this. Also, I'm not sure if this is important for picking out the right tools, but I am thinking of including a feature to run parts of the simulation at different levels of detail, for example, you could "zoom in" on a battle that's happening and see each individual shot, or you could just get the main idea of the battle, like if you won and how much gold you got or something like that. Thanks for any suggestions.
  5. Hey all, This isn't really a post that fits into any particular forum, so I'm posting it here, but feel free to move it mods, if you feel that it should move. I figured it isn't really specifically about game dev related careers. I'm a recent college grad, currently working as a software engineer as part of a rotational program, so I'll be spending some time in my current role then rotating to a new location and new software engineering related position. I did my undergrad in Computer Science, and while Computer Science had been my main career interest for quite some time before college, while working my way through college my main focus really was just to get done with the degree, get a job, and be done with the extreme stress/too much work during college. Now that I'm out, I'm not as sure about my career direction as I was before. While I do still do like Computer Science, software engineering, etc., my current position, although well paying, doesn't really involve me doing much on a day to day basis (for now at least though that's subject to change). The good news is that I've got a lot of control over where I rotate to next. Interestingly enough, initially I got interested in Computer Science because of game dev (as a teenager at least). Then that morphed into AI and machine learning. Now it's....unknown really. Now the thing is I've kind of been bouncing around in all sorts of directions. I absolutely love 3d art and have been actively trying to get better at it. I've also taken up writing and considered trying to write a novel in my spare time. Then I'm finding graphics programming very interesting as well (although that's not what my day job is), and I still have quite an interest in machine learning, data science, text mining, etc. In short, I have absolutely no clue which direction to move towards. My parents believe I need to get a graduate degree, either an MBA or an MS in Computer Science. I, honestly, have no clue. And so I'm here, wondering what I should do with very little actual idea of what I should do. So I'd like to here your thoughts, fellow people of this particular section of the Internet. Thanks in advance!
  6. Looking for a game engine.

    First off, I have some experience in coding, and I've been told I am talented in the ways of mathematics, but I never learned an entire programming language well enough to make an actual game. But I'm not looking for a game engine where there is no coding or scripting at all, I would prefer something where you can set up the game world or levels by dragging and dropping objects in. But I could control the behavior of the objects through simple logic parameters that you set up by selecting things from lists and inputting data. One example is that if you were dropping in the area the player would walk on you could select the object that the player would walk on and from a list that would come up you would select something like "Lable" or "Property" that would bring up a text box where you could input something like "solidSurface" and then you would select the level which would bring up a list where you could select an if/then choice and you would be guided through a thing called "Object Define" where it would say, "If object has lable/property, " and you would select from a list of lables or properties you already made like the "solidSurface" thing you entered in earlier, then you would select some things from a list saying "Player" and you would select an action like "Collide" and finally you would select an action that would happen on collision like "Stop" and you would end up with a surface the player can walk on top of.Or if you were making an RPG and you wanted to define how a certain attack worked and had already set up variables for the stats of the player, enemies, and equipment you could type in some things like "preDamage = (weaponAtk x 1.25) x ((playerStrgth / 100) + 1)" and "enemyDefence = enemyArmor x ((enemyEnd / 100) + 1)" and "actualDamage = preDamage - enemyDefence" then you would select an if/then/else template saying something like "if actualDamage < 0, actualDamage = 0, else enemyHP = enemyHP - actualDamage"If you know of a game engine that is like or similar to what I'm looking for or if you need more information to know for sure, please leave a reply.
  7. Hey all, As some of you may know, I do have a Computer Science background, but either by chance/design/fate/insert stupid excuse here, I didn't take any graphics courses in my undergraduate degree, but now I'd be very interested in at least learning the basics of graphics and potentially pursuing more in graphics. I'm interested in all sorts of graphics in general, so everything from real-time engines to rendering engines like Arnold, Octane, etc. Can anyone point me in the right directions for books/tutorials? Thanks in advance! EDIT: Apologies in advance if I missed the proper channels for this as well
  8. Hello everyone! I'm one of the creators of the Colossal Game Music Collection and, as we now approach the end of the first year in which the collection has been released, we are currently planning our first major update to it... As such, we thought it would be cool to ask you guys first about what sort of music content indie devs are most looking for and what they think it's currently missing on the asset markets. We would truly appreciate your opinions on this, as it would be crucial to improve the quality and usability of our collection. Here it goes: - Our first question is in regards to the type of music currently available to indie devs (for example "Action", "Horror", "Fantasy"...) and not just in regards to the game genre, but also to the type of instrumentation / production (for example "Electronic", "Orchestral", "Ambient"...). What type of game music asset types are you most in need these days and feel like they're lacking on the marketplaces? - The second question is in regards to how the music itself is presented in the asset packs. For instance, we have been making 5 original tracks per pack available on the collection, available as both full tracks and seamless loops (sometimes with also smaller / longer versions available, as well as multiple small loops). Do you think this is the best approach? Or would you prefer the music to be presented in any other way? Any other information you can give is also very much welcomed. Cheers!
  9. This is an extract from Practical Game AI Programming from Packt. Click here to download the book for free! When humans play games – like chess, for example – they play differently every time. For a game developer this would be impossible to replicate. So, if writing an almost infinite number of possibilities isn’t a viable solution game developers have needed to think differently. That’s where AI comes in. But while AI might like a very new phenomenon in the wider public consciousness, it’s actually been part of the games industry for decades. Enemy AI in the 1970s Single-player games with AI enemies started to appear as early as the 1970s. Very quickly, many games were redefining the standards of what constitutes game AI. Some of those examples were released for arcade machines, such as Speed Race from Taito (a racing video game), or Qwak (a duck hunting game using a light gun), and Pursuit (an aircraft fighter) both from Atari. Other notable examples are the text-based games released for the first personal computers, such as Hunt the Wumpus and Star Trek, which also had AI enemies. What made those games so enjoyable was precisely that the AI enemies that didn't react like any others before them. This was because they had random elements mixed with the traditional stored patterns, creating games that felt unpredictable to play. However, that was only possible due to the incorporation of microprocessors that expanded the capabilities of a programmer at that time. Space Invaders brought the movement patterns and Galaxian improved and added more variety, making the AI even more complex. Pac-Man later on brought movement patterns to the maze genre – the AI design in Pac-Man was arguably as influential as the game itself. After that, Karate Champ introduced the first AI fighting character and Dragon Quest introduced the tactical system for the RPG genre. Over the years, the list of games that has used artificial intelligence to create unique game concepts has expanded. All of that has essentially come from a single question, how can we make a computer capable of beating a human in a game? All of the games mentioned used the same method for the AI called finite-state machine (FSM). Here, the programmer inputs all the behaviors that are necessary for the computer to challenge the player. The programmer defined exactly how the computer should behave on different occasions in order to move, avoid, attack, or perform any other behavior to challenge the player, and that method is used even in the latest big budget games. From simple to smart and human-like AI One of the greatest challenges when it comes to building intelligence into games is adapting the AI movement and behavior in relation to what the player is currently doing, or will do. This can become very complex if the programmer wants to extend the possibilities of the AI decisions. It's a huge task for the programmer because it's necessary to determine what the player can do and how the AI will react to each action of the player. That takes a lot of CPU power. To overcome that problem, programmers began to mix possibility maps with probabilities and perform other techniques that let the AI decide for itself how it should react according to the player's actions. These factors are important to be considered while developing an AI that elevates a games’ quality. Games continued to evolve and players became even more demanding. To deliver games that met player expectations, programmers had to write more states for each character, creating new in-game and more engaging enemies. Metal Gear Solid and the evolution of game AI You can start to see now how technological developments are closely connected to the development of new game genres. A great example is Metal Gear Solid; by implementing stealth elements, it moved beyond the traditional shooting genre. Of course, those elements couldn't be fully explored as Hideo Kojima probably intended because of the hardware limitations at the time. However, jumping forward from the third to the fifth generation of consoles, Konami and Hideo Kojima presented the same title, only with much greater complexity. Once the necessary computing power was there, the stage was set for Metal Gear Solid to redefine modern gaming. Visual and audio awareness One of the most important but often underrated elements in the development of Metal Gear Solid was the use of visual and audio awareness for the enemy AI. It was ultimately this feature that established the genre we know today as a stealth game. Yes, the game uses Path Finding and a FSM, features already established in the industry, but to create something new the developers took advantage of some of the most cutting-edge technological innovations. Of course the influence of these features today expands into a range of genres from sports to racing. After that huge step for game design, developers still faced other problems. Or, more specifically, these new possibilities brought even more problems. The AI still didn't react as a real person, and many other elements were required, to make the game feel more realistic. Sports games This is particularly true when we talk about sports games. After all, interaction with the player is not the only thing that we need to care about; most sports involve multiple players, all of whom need to be ‘realistic’ for a sports game to work well. With this problem in mind, developers started to improve the individual behaviors of each character, not only for the AI that was playing against the player but also for the AI that was playing alongside them. Once again, Finite State Machines made up a crucial part of Artificial Intelligence, but the decisive element that helped to cultivate greater realism in the sports genre was anticipation and awareness. The computer needed to calculate, for example, what the player was doing, where the ball was going, all while making the ‘team’ work together with some semblance of tactical alignment. By combining the new features used in the stealth games with a vast number of characters on the same screen, it was possible to develop a significant level of realism in sports games. This is a good example of how the same technologies allow for development across very different types of games. How AI enables a more immersive gaming experience A final useful example of how game realism depends on great AI is F.E.A.R., developed by Monolith Productions. What made this game so special in terms of Artificial Intelligence was the dialog between enemy characters. While this wasn’t strictly a technological improvement, it was something that helped to showcase all of the development work that was built into the characters' AI. This is crucial because if the AI doesn't say it, it didn't happen. Ultimately, this is about taking a further step towards enhanced realism. In the case of F.E.A.R., the dialog transforms how you would see in-game characters. When the AI detects the player for the first time, it shouts that it found the player; when the AI loses sight of the player, it expresses just that. When a group of (AI generated) characters are trying to ambush the player, they talk about it. The game, then, almost seems to be plotting against the person playing it. This is essential because it brings a whole new dimension to gaming. Ultimately, it opens up possibilities for much richer storytelling and complex gameplay, which all of us – as gamers – have come to expect today.
  10. Game Writing test

    Hello, first time posting - and doing this at work - so do let me know if there's an introduction thread I should be posting in first. I've been asked by a studio I massively admire to submit some writing samples to them - 3 samples, 10 or fewer pages. I have a prose sample prepared, which they've expressed interest in, and the other two should ideally be game writing/'screenplay'. My question is... what kind of 'game writing' is suitable for situations like this? I have a sample I previously prepared for another writing test, primarily testing character concept ability and battle chatter.
  11. How to setup and run a test of 32 players in a network game? I'm using the Steam API, and FacePunch networking for a PC game. In the past for console, I'd invite 8-12 people over and use every machine in the office. Now, the player count is too high for that to work. What can be done to test?
  12. I'm using FacePunch networking for Online gameplay in my upcoming Steam title. Newly created accounts, are limited until they spend $10. I need to test a 32 player game, so this is a problem. Is there a way around this (Excluding running a Beta)?
  13. I am doing a little physics project with circle circle collisions for now, and have tried to do impulse resolution for collisions with 2 circles, using the following code. relativeVelocity = (other.doVerletVelocity()).subtract(self.doVerletVelocity()) normDirecVel = relativeVelocity.dotProduct(collisionNormal) restitution = -1 - min(self.restitution, other.restitution) numerator = normDirecVel * restitution impulseScalar = numerator / float(1 / self.mass) + float(1 / other.mass) selfVel = self.doVerletVelocity() otherVel = other.doVerletVelocity() impulse = collisionNormal.scalarMult(impulseScalar) selfDV = impulse.scalarMult(1 / self.mass) otherDV = impulse.scalarMult(1 / other.mass) newSelfVel = selfVel.subtract(selfDV) newOtherVel = otherVel.add(otherDV) self.oldPos = (self.center).subtract(newSelfVel.scalarMult(dt)) other.oldPos = (other.center).subtract(newOtherVel.scalarMult(dt)) The problem seems to be that whatever value I give to self.mass and other.mass, the output stays exactly the same, the values that I used are: center = Vector(0, 0) radius = 1 oldPos = Vector(0, 0) accel = Vector(0, 0) mass = 100 restitution = 0.001 center2 = Vector(0, 3.20) radius2 = 1 oldPos2 = Vector(0, 3.201) accel2 = Vector(0, -1) mass2 = 1 restitution2 = 1 the output was: 0.0 0.0 0.0 2.165000000000114 0.0 0.0 0.0 2.1360000000001174 0.0 0.0 0.0 2.1066000000001206 0.0 0.0 0.0 2.076800000000124 0.0 0.0 0.0 2.046600000000127 0.0 0.0 0.0 2.0160000000001306 0.0 0.0 0.0 1.985000000000134 CIRCLE INTERSECTION 0.0 -1.985000000000134 0.0 3.938600000000271 0.0 -3.970000000000268 0.0 5.891800000000408 0.0 -5.9550000000004015 0.0 7.844600000000544 0.0 -7.940000000000535 0.0 9.797000000000681 I changed the values for the masses to make them higher, bu the output still remained the same, if you could get to the bottom of this, it would be much appreciated.
  14. Dear all game developer out there, Should I learn C++ or C# first before getting my hands dirty with any game engines because I saw a lot of posts talking about how these two computer languages (object-oriented language) is quite useful for making games. And where can I learn it step by step as a complete beginner Thank you
  15. Saying Hello; Tips are Welcome

    Hi there! I'm Kvie. I'm currently quite overwhelmed at the prospect of trying to make games, but I'm all for it. I mostly just wanted to introduce myself, and I hope that's appropriate for this forum! I'm most interested in creating 2D games, and possibly RPGs, or with RPG elements. My biggest inspiration overall is ConcernedApe's (Eric Barone) Stardew Valley. The fact that someone did what I basically want to do, and was successful, is just really mind-blowing. I have basic skills and talents in most areas: art, music, writing, and programming. I'm not starting from zero, so let's call it, I don't know, 1. I'm starting from 1. All tips and general advice are welcome, even though I have no specific questions to ask at this moment. Thank you for reading. ^^
  16. Please, help to find mistakes and improve my skills in game modelling Here is my 3D portfolio Thanks
  17. I am trying to encapsulate a Physics Engine (to support fracturing). I want to know whether my below semantic is bad smell. [Approach 1] My current design is :- Programmer can create 2 types of Physics body : Parent, and Child Parent is a body that can't have any shape or mass, but can contain some Parents or Children. Child is a body that can't contain any other physic body, it always has shape and mass. For the implementation :- Both Parent and Child are inherite d from a class PhysicBody. PhysicBody has some fields. One of them is mass, as an example. Mass of a Parent is the total mass of every children. Mass of a Child is the mass of itself. Suppose that I want to simulate a jar that can explode into several pieces. I will :- Create a Parent named x Create many Child that denote fractures e.g. y1 y2 y3. x.add(y1); x.add(y2); x.add(y3); The steps are very similar to BulletPhysics's. So far, it works well in all demos. Coding is easy and fun. Today, I want to implement a tank like this :- (a crappy tank shown in top-view) Here is how it can be created :- x is a Child : x = createCube(); y is a Child : y = createSphere(); z is a Child : z = createCylinder(); p is a Parent : p.add(x); p.add(y); p.add(z); It works, but I think it is counter-intuitive :- The tank is p which is an relatively (too) abstract physic body. [Approach 2] Thus, I plan to make it like :- x = createCube() y = createSphere(); x.add(y); z = createCylinder(); z.add(y); The new sematic demand me to re-design Physics class, e.g. to be :- Old parent and child will become the same type - all of them can now has shape, mass and contain children! I think it would work well, but I am still too scared. Question Is it make sense to allow non-empty physic body to contain some other physic bodies? Are Approach 1 and Approach 2 bad designs? Can Approach 2 be considered an improvement? Did you spot something (potentially) wrong? How to improve it? Am I a problem myself?
  18. Hello everyone, I'm pretty far off in my game development, but one thing bothers me more and more and i need some opinions. I am making a 2D sidescrolling roguelike endless shmup and very soon i will have to decide whether i will have a 0-100 health/armor system (100 hp, enemy bullets deal from 1-100 damage) or a "life" system (10 lives, all bullet or enemy contact takes one life and makes you invincible for few seconds). Health system is quite well implemented in Jets 'n' Guns, though the game is level based and linear, with armor pickups inplemented in levels. Endless games like Steredenn implement life system with replenishment at the end if every level. Life system is more "hardcore" oriented and it probably suits the "hardcore" audience more, which is probably the majority of the genre players, but it is severely limiting in terms of design of enemy attacks and bullet sizes. On the other hand, health system seems more approachable, enables much wider variety of enemies and attacks, but i'm afraid it might put off players that passionately like the genre and still not prove appaling enough for other players. Another con would be that it can be harder to balance. What do you think? I personally lean towards health model, but besides jets 'n' guns which is level based, not endless, i don't know many other good examples.
  19. Starting from absolute zero.

    I recently came up with an idea for a game after 4hr scrolling through 9GAG (Yes, 9GAG) and I'm into it. It's an pixel-art style 2D top-down RPG with class advancement system and that's all I came up with at time of writing. The problem is I don't know where to start. Engine, platform, programming skill, programming language, and other stuffs. After looking up the forum I saw choices like Unity3D and UE4 but my laptop is the low-medium tier and I don't know whether it can run the dev kit. Also I want the game to be light (around 2GB RAM and a medium-tier GPU as "Recommended System Requirement") and my programming language is Python 3. As the topic said, where should I start? And should I go read some (a lot) of book? My Twitter is at @Chr0n10, Discord is at Celestial#6261 if anyone is up for high-speed (and/or agressive) discussions. Thanks in advance. Sorry for the long post, here's a potato (in attachment, perhaps?)
  20. I need some help and I have many questions. I want to work with interior and exterior (in other words architecture) designs in Unreal Engine. I currently do my architecture projects in Archicad (You can check it out if you want to). However I want to reach a higher level in presenting my projects (take for exmaple this). So I need te learn Unreal Engine to make intereactive presentation. Now to reach that quality, I also have to learn Blender to create 3D Models for my presentation. Or should I learn 3DSMax? I prefer to learn new things by reading a book, which has practice exercises (or just exercises). I can't learn with YouTube Videos. I have tried, but It didn't work for me (I used the UE4 Tutorial playlist by Unreal Engine in YT). Right now i have two books: Justin Plowman - 3D Game Design with Unreal Engine 4 and Blender Gordon Fisher - Blender 3D Basics: Second Edition 2nd Revised ed. Edition Are this books OK to learn the basics? (I noticed that they also have some exercises) Do you think you know a better book to learn Blender and Unreal Engine? (Also I don't want to learn C++ progamming. I want to focus in Blueprint programming. It's more fun and easy to learn and undersrand(in my opinion)) Which should i learn first: Blender or UE4? I would be really greatful if you would help me guys :)) and i am sorry if my English is garbage. Really thank you
  21. I'm trying to create a simple RPG in the classic Final Fantasy style where the player wanders around a world having menu-based encounters. I want the world to be 3D, but I'm not aiming at anything like Skyrim with its realistic-looking world. I don't even want to try to fool the players into thinking I lovingly hand-crafted meshes for each area. On the contrary, I want meshes that are simple and procedurally generated so I can design the world in broad terms without having to model every detail of the terrain by hand. To be clear, the world is not going to be procedurally generated; that will be hand-crafted along the the encounters and story of the game. What needs to be procedurally generated are the meshes that are rendered to represent the world to the player, because the resources are not available to generate a whole world of meshes by hand. My only real requirements for the world are the things that would be expected of the usual RPG. It should have vertical cliffs to block the player's movement, along with cave entrances in some of the cliffs. There's no need actually carve a cave into the cliff mesh; it can simply be a symbolic entrance that takes the player to another scene. The game should also have impassible forests which are like cliffs but rendered as a solid wall of trees. It should have deserts and swamps to cause the player to move more slowly, and roads to cause the player to move more quickly. It should have buildings to trigger menu-driven events, but the buildings can be as simple as cubes with tasteful textures. None of these elements needs to be rendered in great detail, but it is important that there be enough variety to allow the player to recognize a place that has been seen before. I'm prepared to accept that the world may need to be created on a regular grid. Of the many tutorials that I have looked at, the Catlike Coding tutorial for doing Hex Maps in Unity is by far the best. It goes from the simplest of hex grids all the way to creating worlds with mountains, roads, and rivers. I cannot express how helpful it has been, though it is not a perfect fit for my needs. For one thing, there are no hexes in the design document of my game. It seems that the whole project could be simplified by using squares instead of hexes, but either way I'd want to try to minimize the appearance of the grid. It occurs to me that I might create a height map within each square to allow for detailed hills and valleys as opposed to the rigidly defined plateaus of the tutorial's hex map. Even so, it's hard to disguise the grid nature of the world, and it's hard to give a place distinctive look when it is confined to a rigid grid. I love the idea of spline-based roads and rivers, but unfortunately it seems difficult to combine them into a height map terrain. It seems that 3D spline roads work best when they are somehow floating in space, akin to the F-Zero games. Here is a Youtube tutorial going into detail on how to create such floating spline roads: Unite 2015 - A coder's guide to spline-based procedural geometry. Here is an article I found discussing the combination of vector-based features with height map terrain: Real-time rendering and editing of vector-based terrains. The title is fascinating because it suggests that the article would be excellent for my needs. Another such evocative title is: Automating the Construction of Large-Scale Virtual Worlds. Unfortunately I don't have the full text of that one. Looking deeper into this, it seems that putting spline roads onto height map terrain is actually one of the great problems for the ages. All the solutions I can find are quite elaborate, and this is intended to be a simple game, not a display of technical wizardry. The difficulty of using spline roads on height map terrain suggests the possibility of using spline roads without height maps. Nothing in the design document particularly requires hills, though it's hard to imagine how places in the game world can have distinctive looks if the whole world is perfectly horizontal. I have also considered doing an entirely voxel-based world akin to Minecraft. It might use Marching Cubes to smooth off the corners. That would be an entirely different can of worms. There are so many options available and all of them seem either difficult or low-quality. On top of all the rest, in order to have a large world I have to consider how to divide the world into chunks. It would be wonderful if someone who knows how to make games would point me in the right direction. This is not my first 3D game, but I have never attempted anything on this scale before. I'm prepared to put effort into this game, but I don't want to waste effort doing it the hard way when all my requirements are so modest. Up to now I've been using Unity for my attempts, so Unity-based recommendations are especially welcome.
  22. I wanted to get some advice on what everyone thinks of this debugger, I've been getting some strange results from testing my code and I wanted to see if anyone else had an issues. For instance, I added three "ClearRenderTargetView" calls and three "Draw full screen quad" calls and my reported fps became a fifth of what it usually was. Thank you.
  23. Game Concept Critique

    I aspire to develop games one day, and often write down ideas for game concepts I have. These aren't full design documents, and I'm not even sure they're full concept documents, if that's even a thing, but they've gotten more detailed overtime. This is the most recent one I wrote. I want critique on the document and the concept itself. I'm honestly not sure what the document should look like. For the game, I basically want to know if it sounds interesting/fun. Thanks. https://docs.google.com/document/d/1Ifjy7B1ylUPljtYrjwnLRWg9JaLrlBDHVC9H74fIFTc/edit?usp=sharing
  24. Hello, I'm trying to get familiar with making interactive music via middlewares, but I'm not in projects that use this tools currently. So, I was wondering if someone can recommend me a way to practice things like layering, combining loops, transitions in a middleware without the need to be in a project that use middlewares. I would like to train this before I get to a project that actually use this technology, as an anticipation. Because maybe then I will be overworked if I have to learn everything having a deadline. Thanks ^^, Albert.
  25. Which is the best beginner game engine to try for the very first time? and why