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Found 246 results

  1. Hi, I am currently a college student studying to become a Game Developer. I need to interview current game developers for a class I'm taking. if anyone seeing this could answer just the 5 questions that I have provided below as well as your name, current position, and how many years you've been in the game industry. I'd really appreciate any responses. Name: Position: Year in the industry: What was the starting salary? How many hours do you work? What did you learn outside of school that was useful? How did you get your job and how hard was it to find it? how was this job different than you expected it to be? Thank you for your time. -Alex Daughters
  2. I got into a conversation awhile ago with some fellow game artists and the prospect of signing bonuses got brought up. Out of the group, I was the only one who had negotiated any sort of sign on bonus or payment above and beyond base compensation. My goal with this article and possibly others is to inform and motivate other artists to work on this aspect of their “portfolio” and start treating their career as a business. What is a Sign-On Bonus? Quite simply, a sign-on bonus is a sum of money offered to a prospective candidate in order to get them to join. It is quite common in other industries but rarely seen in the games unless it is at the executive level. Unfortunately, conversations centered around artist employment usually stops at base compensation, quite literally leaving money on the table. Why Ask for a Sign-On Bonus? There are many reasons to ask for a sign-on bonus. In my experience, it has been to compensate for some delta between how much I need vs. how much the company is offering. For example, a company has offered a candidate a position paying $50k/year. However, research indicates that the candidate requires $60k/year in order to keep in line with their personal financial requirements and long-term goals. Instead of turning down the offer wholesale, they may ask for a $10k sign on bonus with actionable terms to partially bridge the gap. Whatever the reason may be, the ask needs to be reasonable. Would you like a $100k sign-on bonus? Of course! Should you ask for it? Probably not. A sign-on bonus is a tool to reduce risk, not a tool to help you buy a shiny new sports car. Aspects to Consider Before one goes and asks for a huge sum of money, there are some aspects of sign-on bonus negotiations the candidate needs to keep in mind. - The more experience you have, the more leverage you have to negotiate - You must have confidence in your role as an employee. - You must have done your research. This includes knowing your personal financial goals and how the prospective offer changes, influences or diminishes those goals. To the first point, the more experience one has, the better. If the candidate is a junior employee (roughly defined as less than 3 years of industry experience) or looking for their first job in the industry, it is highly unlikely that a company will entertain a conversation about sign-on bonuses. Getting into the industry is highly competitive and there is likely very little motivation for a company to pay a sign-on bonus for one candidate when there a dozens (or hundreds in some cases) of other candidates that will jump at the first offer. Additionally, the candidate must have confidence in succeeding at the desired role in the company. They have to know that they can handle the day to day responsibilities as well as any extra demands that may come up during production. The company needs to be convinced of their ability to be a team player and, as a result, is willing to put a little extra money down to hire them. In other words, the candidate needs to reduce the company’s risk in hiring them enough that an extra payment or two is negligible. And finally, they must know where they sit financially and where they want to be in the short-, mid-, and long-term. Having this information at hand is essential to the negotiation process. The Role Risk Plays in Employment The interviewing process is a tricky one for all parties involved and it revolves around the idea of risk. Is this candidate low-risk or high-risk? The risk level depends on a number of factors: portfolio quality, experience, soft skills, etc. Were you late for the interview? Your risk to the company just went up. Did you bring additional portfolio materials that were not online? Your risk just went down and you became more hireable. If a candidate has an offer in hand, then the company sees enough potential to get a return on their investment with as little risk as possible. At this point, the company is confident in their ability as an employee (ie. low risk) and they are willing to give them money in return for that ability. Asking for the Sign-On Bonus So what now? The candidate has gone through the interview process, the company has offered them a position and base compensation. Unfortunately, the offer falls below expectations. Here is where the knowledge and research of the position and personal financial goals comes in. The candidate has to know what their thresholds and limits are. If they ask for $60k/year and the company is offering $50k, how do you ask for the bonus? Once again, it comes down to risk. Here is the point to remember: risk is not one-sided. The candidate takes on risk by changing companies as well. The candidate has to leverage the sign-on bonus as a way to reduce risk for both parties. Here is the important part: A sign-on bonus reduces the company’s risk because they are not commiting to an increased salary and bonus payouts can be staggered and have terms attached to them. The sign-on bonus reduces the candidate’s risk because it bridges the gap between the offered compensation and their personal financial requirements. If the sign-on bonus is reasonable and the company has the finances (explained further down below), it is a win-win for both parties and hopefully the beginning a profitable business relationship. A Bit about Finances First off, I am not a business accountant nor have I managed finances for a business. I am sure that it is much more complicated than my example below and there are a lot of considerations to take into account. In my experience, however, I do know that base compensation (ie. salary) will generally fall into a different line item category on the financial books than a bonus payout. When companies determine how many open spots they have, it is usually done by department with inter-departmental salary caps. For a simplified example, an environment department’s total salary cap is $500k/year. They have 9 artists being paid $50k/year, leaving $50k/year remaining for the 10th member of the team. Remember the example I gave earlier asking for $60k/year? The company cannot offer that salary because it breaks the departmental cap. However, since bonuses typically do not affect departmental caps, the company can pull from a different pool of money without increasing their risk by committing to a higher salary. Sweetening the Deal Coming right out of the gate and asking for an upfront payment might be too aggressive of a play (ie. high risk for the company). One way around this is to attach terms to the bonus. What does this mean? Take the situation above. A candidate has an offer for $50k/year but would like a bit more. If through the course of discussing compensation they get the sense that $10k is too high, they can offer to break up the payments based on terms. For example, a counterpoint to the initial base compensation offer could look like this: - $50k/year salary - $5k bonus payout #1 after 30 days of successful employment - $5k bonus payout #2 after 365 days (or any length of time) of successful employment In this example, the candidate is guaranteed $55k/year salary for 2 years. If they factor in a standard 3% cost of living raise, the first 3 years of employment looks like this: - Year 0-1 = $55,000 ($50,000 + $5,000 payout #1) - Year 1-2 = $56,500 (($50,000 x 1.03%) + $5,000 payout #2) - Year 2-3 = $53,045 ($51,500 x 1.03%) Now it might not be the $60k/year they had in mind but it is a great compromise to keep both parties comfortable. If the Company Says Yes Great news! The company said yes! What now? Personally, I always request at least a full 24 hours to crunch the final numbers. In the past, I’ve requested up to a week for full consideration. Even if you know you will say yes, doing due diligence with your finances one last time is always a good practice. Plug the numbers into a spreadsheet, look at your bills and expenses again, and review the whole offer (base compensation, bonus, time off/sick leave, medical/dental/vision, etc.). Discuss the offer with your significant other as well. You will see the offer in a different light when you wake up, so make sure you are not rushing into a situation you will regret. If the Company Say No If the company says no, then you have a difficult decision to make. Request time to review the offer and crunch the numbers. If it is a lateral move (same position, different company) then you have to ask if the switch is worth it. Only due diligence will offer that insight and you have to give yourself enough time to let those insights arrive. You might find yourself accepting the new position due to other non-financial reasons (which could be a whole separate article!). Conclusion/Final Thoughts When it comes to negotiating during the interview process, it is very easy to take what you can get and run. You might fear that in asking for more, you will be disqualifying yourself from the position. Keep in mind that the offer has already been extended to you and a company will not rescind their offer simply because you came back with a counterpoint. Negotiations are expected at this stage and by putting forth a creative compromise, your first impression is that of someone who conducts themselves in a professional manner. Also keep in mind that negotiations do not always go well. There are countless factors that influence whether or not someone gets a sign-on bonus. Sometimes it all comes down to being there at the right time at the right place. Just make sure you do your due diligence and be ready when the opportunity presents itself. Hope this helps!
  3. I have a MongoDB db on a server operated by Kryonet. Obviously I need to be able to query the database from the client for adding, removing, requesting all kind of assets. Now I have written the code to request, add and remove fighters on the Kryonet network I am wondering if there is a better way to do this. I feel it's a bit repetitive, especially when I need to implement this for all other assets the player can own and other players assets when needed. The way I am currently approaching this is the same as my chat/lobby system which works great but I was wondering if anyone could see improvement on my code or a complete different way that is much more scalable perhaps. public class ClientAssets { public static final int FIGHTER_REQUEST = 1; public static final int FIGHTER_RESPONSE = 2; public static final int FIGHTER_ADD = 3; public static final int FIGHTER_REMOVE = 4; public static void Register(EndPoint endPoint) { Kryo kryo = endPoint.getKryo(); kryo.register(FighterRequest.class); kryo.register(FighterResponse.class); kryo.register(FighterAdd.class); kryo.register(FighterRemove.class); } static public abstract class AssetPacket { public int packetId; public AssetPacket() { } } /** * Packet to request all owned fighters */ public static class FighterRequest extends AssetPacket { public ObjectId playerId; public FighterRequest(ObjectId playerId) { packetId = FIGHTER_REQUEST; this.playerId = playerId; } public FighterRequest() { } } /** * Receiving fighter data from server */ public static class FighterResponse extends AssetPacket { public Fighter fighter; public boolean add; // Add or remove public FighterResponse(Fighter fighter, boolean add) { packetId = FIGHTER_RESPONSE; this.fighter = fighter; this.add = add; } public FighterResponse() { } } /** * Adds a fighter to player assets */ public static class FighterAdd extends AssetPacket { public ObjectId fighterTemplateID; public FighterAdd(ObjectId fighterTemplateID) { packetId = FIGHTER_ADD; this.fighterTemplateID = fighterTemplateID; } public FighterAdd() { } } /** * Removes fighter from assets. */ public static class FighterRemove extends AssetPacket { public ObjectId fighterId; public FighterRemove(ObjectId fighterId) { packetId = FIGHTER_REMOVE; this.fighterId = fighterId; } public FighterRemove() { } } } To elaborate a bit more, this code will communicate between client and server. When receiving a request on the server it will lookup the request in the database. The client will store it for displaying the assets. A specific thing I am unsure about is the FighterResponse.add boolean. I need to be able to remove and add fighters, I guess I am better off with a FighterAddResponse and a FighterRemove response so I will send one boolean less each time this packet is send. But this will create even more repetitive code.
  4. A sticky dilemma. I'm part of a team based in USA that produces a virtual world software for remote business purposes. The businesses that use us are our Clients with users from all over the world (and expanding), but primarily in the USA. Our software makes use of customizable human avatars to use in world for each user. We have gotten requests from one of our biggest paying Clients and approval from boss to include religion based avatar clothing options (yamulkes, headscarves, skullcaps and turban head coverings currently, potentially garments too). As our software is used for business, most people want to keep their real world likeness, which may include some of this clothing because it is a part of their identity. Since this is such a sensitive topic on all sides involved and we are in a politically charged climate in the USA, clearly we don't want to offend anyone because they all pay us. In my opinion, even if this request was deemed as a reason for loss on Client's part, it will still be our company providing the service that will be affected primarily. As an emerging company we can't afford to lose users or current/potential Clients over something unrelated to the core mechanics or hardware requirements of the game. How do we put it in the avatar creation menu? Keep it with the other head coverings (so not to upset/offend the religious wear users via segregation) or separate it (to protect from accidental abuse of said garments from ignorant users and offend everybody)? As difficult as it would be for us to do (right now), do we only allow access to certain users? Would that be going too far to request information such as this from users, or for them to have to volunteer it for access? How do we talk about it with the client? When the concern was brought up, they warned us to be careful about using the term "religious wear", so we switched to the more broad "cultural wear", in which they again implied even that term might offend in discussion (because Texas users (very many) would get mad about their cowboy hats not being treated as culturally significant...) and client tactfully avoided telling us what they want us to call it themselves. How do we have a productive conversation though they put out a controversial request and are not willing to speak confidently on it's behalf?
  5. Grassroots Game Jam

    Last weekend was the first ever Game Jam at Marshall University. The Game Design Guild (club) has been planning to have one for months, but we're a new organization, still trying to get our feet on the ground. Lucky for us, and awesome doctor at our University had recently started a Digital Humanities program. She also wanted to hold a game jam, so we teamed up. 2 Game Developers + 2 English Professors = 1 Game Jam Admin Team! I also asked a guy from Dakota State how they run game jams, since he has run far bigger ones than this. He had a lot of good advice We advertised as best we could, and had no clue how many people would show up. It could have been five, it could have been thirty... Fortunately, we got a sweet number: 12 participants. Surprisingly, none were above college age, and many were high school, or even younger. There was an 8-year old in attendance. However, most of them weren't too social. I followed some advice I had received, and mixed the people around with each other while they came up with ideas. I'm not sure if it backfired or not: Everyone amalgamed into one GIANT group. They also decided to use Unity. So it began. Thanks to Piskel, everyone could easily make pixel art. One person found SFX, and a couple guys made music. It's amazing how many web-based tools there are. We showed these to our participants before getting started: https://soundation.com - Make music http://piskelapp.com - Make pixel art http://twinery.org - Make text and HTML adventure games https://ledoux.itch.io/bitsy - Make games where you walk around, talk to people https://freesound.org - Search THOUSANDS of free SFX However, programmers were short. One was experienced, and could only stay for half the project. Another 2 were low experience. In the end, one of them took on a team management role. With 12 people, team management is a full-time role! To pull it all together, I ended up programming about half of the game. We had more art than we could use, and it all came together in 18 hours. The final product is playable in-browser: https://mugameguild.itch.io/60-second-hero Before getting sucked into the main jam team, I also pitched to our admins that the four of us make a simple game. I tapped them for art and writing, and them implemented it in ~3-4 hours with a dialogue system I had already made: https://mugameguild.itch.io/game-jam-admin-2018 One weekend, two games. Monday was a showcase day, so that anyone interested could see the final product. There are five endings depending on what items you collect in the game, and people enjoyed trying to find all five Overall: SUCCESS. (Not how I expected, but it worked) Experience Points: Never underestimate the time overhead when you coordinate multiple people. Working in a team is not like working alone, and it's easy to end up with duplicate work and "idle villagers." ALWAYS have a sign-up or registration, even if it's not required. It takes a LOT of guesswork out of planning. You can never have too much non-perishable food. Or pizza. Instead of reinventing the wheel, talk to people who have done it before. Pizza Be flexible and run your event based on who comes. Having 3-person teams working in Unity when nobody has used Unity makes no sense. ANY GAME JAM: Only try to make a game that you know you can pull off. If you don't know how to do it, you probably can't do it well in a day. Choose your team wisely, LIMIT THAT SCOPE If you have two days, get a working prototype after ONE day. That way, you have a whole day to make it fun. This is just a game. Seriously, take care of yourself, exercise, go to church, etc., no game jam is worth your health. Peace!
  6. I'm getting back into C++ after not playing with it for many years. Being spoiled as a C# programmer I'm finding quite a few things about the Visual Studio environment surprisingly puzzling. I'm used to just being able to add a class to a folder, and I want to structure my code in folders with matching namespace, but whenever I try to add a class to a folder Visual Studio just puts it in the root. I can of course move it but I can't help thinking - if VS is making it so hard for me to do what I want am I doing something wrong? How do you structure your C++ code?
  7. Advice Nim or Rust?

    The Nim's readme say "its a compiled, garbage-collected systems programming language which has an excellent productivity/performance ratio. Nim's design focuses on efficiency, expressiveness, elegance (in the order of priority)." Nim include features like a deterministic soft real-time GC that allows for its max pause time and supports manual memory management. Other features, compile to C (C++, Objective C, or JavaScript), strongly statically typed, powerful meta-programming, compile-time execution, easy to read (Python like syntax), and local type inference. It is multi-paradigm supporting, imperative, minimal object-oriented (encouraging composition over inheritance), functional procedural styles. Some tools like a package manager (nimble), C2nim (C and C++ bindings), and Nimsuggest. Also these a game development framework and are two cons are the bus factor and not release yet. Rust's website say " is a systems programming language that runs blazingly fast, prevents segfaults, and guarantees thread safety." Features include, CFFI, immutability, robust meta-programming, RAII, modern type system, strongly statically typed, compiles to native code, safe rust by default (you can unsafe too), immutability, fine grained control over memory, and modules. It is multi-paradigm supporting, concurrent, functional, imperative, structured, and generic procedural styles. Some tools like Cargo (a package manager), RLS (Rust Language Server), rustfmt (formating), clippy (lints), and rust-bindgen (Automatically generate C or C++ bindings). Coming features are generators/async/await, SIMD, custom allocators, and compiles to WASM. Also verysus resources and strong game dev community. I took two intro programming courses well in school ( JavaScript & Python). Both are memory safe and can do low-level programming and between Nim or Rust which one is more susceptible for game development? Thank you for the advice.
  8. Hi everyone! I'm currently studying at uni and we have an assignment which requires us to seek advice from the game design community! So I would love some opinions or advice on the following topics/questions: What trends and technologies do you think will be arising within the next 3 years and how will that impact the gaming industry? What skills and knowledge are required to enter and maintain a career in games? Can anyone recommend a 'professional activity' for me to engage in, eg a gaming magazine I can subscribe to or a free webinar or workshop I could view? Thanks!
  9. First Game Maker Program?

    To all the game devs out there, what’s a good game design program to start with? Mainly for platformers and/or rpgs. I've heard of quite a few, but I don't know where to start.
  10. I finished my game and I'm trying to make a introduction video, I got some feedback from: So I created a new one here: If you have any suggestions please let me know, thank you. Also I'm thinking about creating another more in depth video that is about 6 minutes, it will explain the space connector mechanics more clearly, which I won't use as the introduction video but will direct people who are interested in the game to it. However, I'm wondering if I should do that or just let the players discover it for themselves in game.
  11. Hey everyone, ive used tools like Intel GPA in the past and I would like to continue doing that. But in my current work environment I cant find a tool that can analyze rendering without a swapchain and calling Present(). In addition to that, the program Im working on uses WPF for UI, which uses a D3D9Ex Device and some tools attach to that device instead. So, are there any tools that allow debugging D3D11 without depending on a swapchain? Thanks for any help!
  12. Hi guys and gals! I'm new to the forum and have Googled for this topic and didn't find any satisfying results (most of them concentrate on fixed update rates). I understand the reason for fixed update speeds (syncing up physics and all of that) but why there is no mention of limiting rendering speed also? My reasoning is that you can save CPU time of you do not render constantly, right? Please correct me if I'm wrong Thanks!
  13. I’m currently working on a game, in which I want players to be able to create their own content and models. Is there a way to allow players to both create models in game and import models into the game from outside sources?
  14. Marketing idea

    Hiiii, so ive been studying marketing in my own time and I have experiments i wanna try do to past recorded strategies of other marketing strategies. Also im on Redbull, Dr Pepper and a 48 hour energy mixture soooooo excuse my preppy nature on my typing and grammer usage. As far as I can see I have a theory (actually I got hundreds of these), so as far as I know a game doesnt necessarily need to be advertised to be sucessful from the content publishers themself. There are other means to counter the forceful advertisment. Yea im not speaking of reviews and playthrews to go up in search ranking and relevancy tho that is a tactic that happens on its own. Sooo whats on my mind today is that online games pretty much baits the players to spend money to look smancy, now what if the fancy panties were to be grabable in game without the need to spend actual money. Then no one would spend anything right? What if i told you there is a way to trick players mentallity using this method in order to get them to spend money. Your probably thinking to yourself "go to sleep Anthony you are drunk"... Im energy high theres a different... If a function were to be available in game for free then by all means players would go the free route, now if the free route was difficult to achieve the player would quit the game and you will have a fanbase on those rage quiters (Dark Souls, and binding of isaac). If the free route was easy to perform yet very time consuming and grindy then thats more hours spent on the game. Now heres the trick, what if the option to purchase instead of grinding was available? Then the players would think, would they spend a full hour trying to fetch the item, which in a working net worth terms 10$... Or would they rather spend 3$ to get the item right away. [deleted by moderator] This weird drink mixture is making me lo key depressed. Alsooo what do you think about this marketing concept...
  15. Advice on Starting a Prototype

    With my design document relatively fleshed out, my mind is turning towards starting a prototype. As they say, the first step is always the hardest. This will be my first self-driven project, and that first step is looking awfully daunting. Does anyone have any advice on where to start? I know this is a very personal choice, but I'm interested to hear how more experienced devs approach that first step in development. For example, do you start small with something like the player movement and controls? Or do you prefer to set the stage a bit first by establishing a bit of the world space?
  16. Hi all, I’ve nearly finished my C# WPF project (using VS2017) and am now thinking about deployment and managing updates. This is my first time doing this, and I wanted to run my current thinking past you to see if you can help, as I don’t think my current solution will fully work. I have drawn a quick mock-up of what’s in my head at the moment (attached). My app needs to be able to update itself, but also to add in new content once I create it (this is in the form of small .zip files, ~100kb each, and due to the volume of these files [currently 3000, hopefully expanded up to 5000 in a years’ time] I have kept these separate from my project, i.e. not as Content). I welcome comments on this decision. Due to keeping the content separate, this kind of broke my initial intention of “simply” using ClickOnce deployment, and letting Windows manage the updating for me, and so I’ve been thinking of how to manage i) initial app deployment, ii) ongoing updating of the app, iii) ongoing addition of new content. I’m currently intending to use my *free* DropBox account to host all the files, I think this is possible. Does anyone know of any better web hosting I could use? If you could refer to my attached diagram, what I’m currently thinking of is: Deploying the initial version of the app using ClickOnce by Publishing to DropBox or wherever (my project A publishing to web host D). Users can then download the Installer from here, and install on their local machines as usual. This initial installation wouldn’t have any content (the 3000 zips) and so these would be pulled down to the local machine by the below step (the initial batch of 3000 zips would only need to be downloaded the first time the app is run, after then it’d just be new content that’d be downloaded): Also, I have as a second Project in my overall Solution a small Updater app, which when run by the users will connect to DropBox and pull down an xml manifest of my project files and the content (I create this manifest myself), and synchronise any files which are newer. This Updater app will be downloaded and installed by the users too. In the diagram, I publish Updater app code C to web host G, downloadable by users. Please see below question: Question: my main app and my updater app are two separate projects under the same Visual Studio Solution. Is it possible for me to build/publish these together so that the two executables are together in the same output (in the same folder)? The reason I have them separate is so that the main project’s executable file and any resource files can be overwritten by any new files pulled down by the Updater app without the Main app being open and locking these files out. The 3000-zip Content on my PC (B in the diagram) I just manually copy over to DropBox (F), and keep these up-to-date when I create new zips. Also, whenever I update my app code, I intend (this is probably the most painful bit) to manually copy the “\bin\release” folder contents from my PC (A) over to web host (E), so that the Updater app on user’s PCs can synchronise the executable and resource files with any newer versions I have created, without the user having to download a new version of the installer, and potentially uninstall/reinstall to go from v1 to v2 of the app. This above bit I think is the least possible, as I have found out that just by moving the \bin\release\ executable and resources from one location to another on my PC, it no longer works if I double-click the .exe file, it only works from the project’s original \bin\release folder . Is this expected? In my naivety I was thinking that once the user had installed v1 of the application "properly" using ClickOnce (and therefore their PC was checked for .Net framework etc) I could then just have my Updater overwrite the .exe and other embedded resource files (like bitmaps) with updates and it’d just work. I guess this would have worked with VS2005, but not with VS2017 hey. So, after writing all that out, and thanks for reading this far, I guess that if it wasn’t for the 3000 zips, I could package all the above as ClickOnce, and let Microsoft manage the updating for me. I don’t fancy adding the 3000 zips to my project as Content [copy if newer] to enable this to happen, but I did fancy having a go at writing the standalone Updater package, which would synchronise the files between DropBox and the user’s PC, based on the xml manifest I create. Any feedback you may have would be greatly appreciated, as this community has proven invaluable to me so far
  17. Advice Question for Non-Musicians

    When seeking a composer for your games, what is it that you will typically look for when hiring someone? What about their music makes you want to employ them? what do you look for in regards to professionality? I'm really curious as i'm seeking to get my foot in the door, but i want to know what i should be doing to impress you and get commissioned! thank you!
  18. I finished this game a while ago, now I'm trying to make an introduction video before I put it on Steam, looking for feedback. I have already got some feedback from other people, and this is what they felt or some of the things I think the video doesn't do a good job: 1. I don't understand the core concept of the game. I think another video that explains the core concept of this game would be better. 2. I feel that the video was too long, it showed way too many features. If you feel the same way, please let me know. If you have any other suggestions/feedback please don't hold back.
  19. Learning Game Programming

    Hello All! I am currently pursuing a degree in video game programming, so far I have completed an intro to programming course and object oriented programming course. Both were taught using C++ as the programming langauge which I know is very popular for game development, but in these classes we do not actually do any game development. I would like to start to build my skills with C++ for game development as that is a common required thing for a job and am looking for ways to do this. Any recommendations such as books to read or youtube videos to watch will be greatly appreciated!
  20. I have a native iOS game (objective c, XCode build) which I am considering to port to other platforms. Core gameplay is based on solely on geographical maps, and custom drawing over maps. It also has Core Data. This part is complete in development. What is not done yet is: monetization, gamification (leaderboards, challenges) and multiplayer functionality. As I think more about it, I am tempted to think if this is the right time to move to a cross platform tool such as Unity. But before dedicating time to port my 5 years side-project effort in Objective C, I really want to know if its worth it. - Does Unity support such plugins / assets that will fulfill all my above requirements? - Unity Personal seems to have only 20 concurrent users - is it too costly scaling if I decide for extending to web and android platforms? - What is the general workflow involved in publishing to iOS, Android, PC, and web platforms while using Unity? I mean to ask about various points of signing stuff, paying fees and getting certified. - How long will it really take to port my entire Objective C project into Unity? I am somewhat familiar with C# but I am finding it hard fidgeting with Unity IDE as lot of things are focused around FPS and 3D while my game is still 2d - not much action involved. I seem bit overwhelmed by the list of features I see there. All in all, I do not want to lose my momentum while still making sure its portable to everywhere. - Any assets I could use (for free to try basis in debug) that are relevant for my game? - Last but not the least, are there any costs that I need to be paying upfront to Unity, for using it (apart from their monthly subscription model)? I don't understand their costing for multiplayer in conjunction with their subscription fees - if someone could kindly elaborate. Thanks in advance for your time reading a newbie
  21. Hi everyone, as summer approaches and the college semester comes close to ending. I want some books or resources you would reccomend to a beginner video game programmer. On a side note, what are the important calculus topics that are applied to programming video games?
  22. I've been working on a small 3D game maker app for a while, but it's now shaping up to be a full fledged (albeit simple) all integrated 3d engine. I think it's promising in the sense that I've built the App I would want to use, and I can see people (mainly beginners) using it for a lot of applications. It has no name yet. I don't plan on making it open source or selling it. I'm just considering setting up a small website with some documentation and a download link. What kind of license would I join with the tool given that: I want people to be able to use it freely I want to be completely free of responsibility I want to prevent people from removing, let's say (hypothetically, not sure how I'd go about this yet), a small banner advertising my software at startup from the application the software would produce The tool was developed in visual studio community 2017, using C# and a single external library, openTK Is there anything else I should think about ? Perhaps when naming it ? EDIT: Also, what about, let's say, a logo, or a design pattern (Artistically speaking) I would use throughout the program and the documentation to make it easily recognizable. How would I go about protecting that ? Thanks guys
  23. Ideas to make more action

    Hi there, Thinking about improving strategy/survival web/app based game with some action in it. Because leveling up the infrastructure, gathering resources, etc, is getting bored. To be more specific it's a survival game, based on astronomy, trying to save planet, etc. So the "fighting" model doesn't fit here, because there are no dragons on the planets :))) Either its a co-op based, so PvP also doesn't fit. Thinking about some puzzles solving at some point of game or turn-based/event-based dissasters handling... Stuck there What do you think ?
  24. Firstly, hello to everyone. So, as the title says, i'm looking for a bit of direction for designing and programming my game idea. What i'm essentially trying to do is create a 2d side scroller along the lines of such titles as Dust: An Elysian Tail, Ori and the Blind Forest, or the Odin Sphere series. I'm currently taking courses on Udemy to learn unity and C#. I chose this route since one of my favorite indie dev studios, Ska Studios, use it making their games. I'm already a decent artist and animator, so I just need something to put the pieces together. I guess i'm looking for an opinion on if this is the best route to take for someone completely new to game development and programming. I've looked into engines like gamemaker, but for what I have in mind (progression systems, inventories, etc) it didn't seem like the way to go. RPGmaker and Unreal also don't seem to be right for what I have in mind. Anyway, thanks for taking the time to help.
  25. Here is the scenario I have pertaining to a combat system I am jotting down on paper. The attacker has 100 soldiers each with 1 attack point and 3 health points. The defender has the same. All the player has to do is press a button and combat is all computed then the player is just shown the results. From my current example, I would have the attacker's soldiers do 100 points of damage to the defender resulting in 33 defenders being killed. The same happens to the attacker's soldiers. This continues until both sides defeat each other at the same time and it ends in a draw. I feel if I introduce a random factor, the battle could get lop-sided and the smaller side could not recover So I thought I would ask the community for their opinions of the very simple combat scenario. The game concept I am designing deals with combat from outside the actual conflict. Sort of like a coach and a sports team. You give orders and watch as your units perform them. The game does start small, with 100 to 200 soldiers (all the same) and could grow to larger numbers as well. I was just wanting to get a system in place for small conflict that could scale into larger ones. Each side has a unit type (soldier) a unit quantity (100). The player give the order, and the computer does the rest. After both players give their orders, the results are computed instantly. Keeping all things equal, Attack power, defensive power, etc. (I need a baseline) What would be the best way to determine damage? Static numbers, or RNG numbers? To use or not use RNG in combat?
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