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Found 131 results

  1. bencinStudios

    Science Game Jam Weekend Project

    Over the weekend of September 8th and 9th, 2018, our team participated in a Game Jam hosted by the Nashville Game Developers and The Adventure Science Center in Nashville, TN. The event kicked off on Saturday morning with introductions and our challenge for the weekend: create a science-based game with an educational spin. Given that The Adventure Science Center had dedicated September as "Make It Month," creating a video game based on the science of water seemed perfectly in sync with that idea. Through a bit of brainstorming and ideation, we came up with our theme: Water. Water is one of the most interesting substances in the universe with a host of properties and uses. We wanted to use our game to teach about the 3 main phases of water - solid, liquid, and gas. The player would be tasked with navigating a 2D puzzle environment using game mechanics to heat or cool their water character to make it through obstacles and finish the puzzle. Following a ton of online research on water, we all got a little bit smarter about how water acts, what it can do, and why it's such a versatile substance! Now, to make that into some interesting and educational gameplay. We knew we wanted the experience to include the player having to change between the various phases of water to complete the level. The challenge became how to do that in an educational, yet fun way. We decided to utilize the idea of a Bunsen burner to heat the water into a gas to be able to float. We would use a freezer to turn the water into an ice cube to be able to break through obstacles. And we'd use the idea of time and friction to turn the gas or ice back into water to navigate grates in the floor. From there, the team began pulling together assets, coding, and building the game level. By the end of Day 1, you could start to see the results of the team's work. For Day 2, our goal was to put out a finished game that would be fully playable start to finish, while also providing some polished visuals and gameplay. One of the aspects added during Day 2 was our water molecule character, Mo L. Cool, who would serve up interesting facts about water or helpful hints to get the player through the puzzle. Seth, our artist, came up with a very cool, unique take on the water molecule, showing the hydrogen atoms as headphones on the "head" of the oxygen atom. Mo L. Cool would live on the game screen and pop up with info every so often throughout the game, triggered by keys the team placed in the level. By mid-Day 2, we had some Adventure Science Center guests come through to see what we were working on at the Game Jam. We decided it would be a perfect time to get some outside opinions on the game and let them play test the current version of the game. With an Xbox controller in hand, the 2 guests gave the game their best shot while providing us some helpful insights into where we could make adjustments and fixes to make the experience even better. By the end of Day 2, we had our completed prototype game, which we dubbed "Mind Over Matter." While we were able to build a complete game level and experience, there are still a few tweaks we'll be making for the final product. We'll be putting it out on our social channels plus this and other gaming sites for folks to download for free to play (very soon). It was great to see at the end of the weekend what all the other developers at the Game Jam had been working on. Each of them showed off their science-themed gaming creations to the group. Some had been working solo on their project, while others also worked in teams. Everyone had amazingly creative ideas and were able to get completed game experiences built over 2 days. We thoroughly enjoyed ourselves and look forward to future game jams! Here's a gameplay video showing our completed prototype from start to finish (that first part is tricky)! ASC Game Jam 9_17_2018 2_14_17 PM-1(4).mp4
  2. Hi I have been googling for the last half an hour to find no result in what I'm looking for. Racing games have the technique called rubber banding. I just want to know what the same kinds of techniques are called for RTS games. I would give more examples but that's the only one I know of. I'm curious as RTS's are my favorite genre and plan on making them in the distant future. Thanks in advance
  3. So im starting to build game for me and my friend to play but if it ends up good then i want it to be easily expandable. My question is ... Where do i learn how to set up a server? how to run code on my server? how do you open your server to the outside world. Not only your home/pc. I want to program my server in java because i'm fairly comfortable with java. I've decided i want a tcp server. Do i need separate server to handle log-ins, registers etc.? I've done a lot of googling and i still can't find any decent tutorials.
  4. Hi, I recently published a book focusing on cloth simulation for computer graphics. Details can be found here: http://www.morganclaypoolpublishers.com/catalog_Orig/product_info.php?cPath=22&products_id=1295 and on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Simulation-Computer-Graphics-Synthesis-Computing/dp/1681734117/ Abstract: I hope you find it interesting! Thanks, Tuur View full story
  5. Hi, I recently published a book focusing on cloth simulation for computer graphics. Details can be found here: http://www.morganclaypoolpublishers.com/catalog_Orig/product_info.php?cPath=22&products_id=1295 and on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Simulation-Computer-Graphics-Synthesis-Computing/dp/1681734117/ Abstract: I hope you find it interesting! Thanks, Tuur
  6. Hi there I'm creating this topic as an introduction to who I am and why I have found my self here. I'm a mature student(26) from England. I have just started My second year at college. So far I have learned a lot about making 2D games from my previous year. This second year is going to be involving more 3D stuff and using engines such as unity and 3DS max. which at the moment I have about an hours experience with. However I'am thoroughly enjoying it, even though I'am only on day 2 of my second year.I just have a few questions that I hope some of you lovely people can help me with. I Love Love Love video games, always have always will. I'm so excited to actually start making some games. How ever career wise I'm unsure as what path I should follow, Artist,animator,programmer ect, they all appeal to me. I've always wanted to set up a business and never new what until about a year ago when I first started studying. So I hope that in the future I will be an indie dev.Think I have rambled on enough now. I will list my questions. 1. What is the best career path to follow? I mean what is the industry lacking? 2.whats the best engine to start off with? so far I have only used construct 2. 3.Is programming as difficult as it sounds? whats the best language to use? 4.How can I get ahead of my fellow students? 5. what is your favorite game and why? I have more but I'll leave it be for now.
  7. Hi, I’d like to show you my current video project “Game Audio Lookout”. It is not a game itself but a series on YouTube about how music and sound design in games work. There is three episodes I produced within the last month and I’m planning to release them on a regular basis! Currently I made 3 episodes so far: Enhancing Gameplay with Music in Celeste - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NYjlfL7dHCQ On the surface, “Celeste” is a brutally hard 2D platforming game about climbing the imaginary Celeste Mountain but it is much more than that. It narrates a compelling story of main character Madeline fighting with her demon doppelgänger. Gameplay-wise, super tricky levels combined with tight controls let you fail and re-try over and over again. But what it makes it even more enjoyable is the wonderful soundtrack composed by Lena Raine we’ll have a look at in this episode of “Game Audio Lookout”. EarthBound - A Quirky Artistic Synergy of Story, Art and Music - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZH4DqgvkE0k In fact, there’s many ways how the three elements writing, artwork and sound can play together. There’s AAA titles with cinematic writing, photorealistic graphics and epic orchestral music on the one hand. Another good example is the “Super Mario Odyssey” world “Steam Gardens” with its funky vibes due to a coherent artistic feel of character design, graphics and audio. But today, we’ll go back to the Super Nintendo era to have a look at one of the strangest games Nintendo ever created: “Earthbound” Deconstructing a Musical Level in Rayman Legends - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3UIhBZuj2HI Rayman Legends has found its way into many “Best Platformer Games of All-Time” lists. Though it closely fails to beat the uncrowned king Super Mario, it found a safe place next the Nintendo mascot. The Rayman series was created by French game designer Michel Ancel and started in 1995 with the 2D jump’n’run Rayman. It was followed by two 3D platforming games: Rayman 2 and Rayman 3. But the series went back to 2D sidescrolling with Rayman Origins in 2011. Origins was also the first Rayman game using the UbiArt Framwork which also was adopted by the 2013 release “Rayman Legends”. In this episode we’ll deconstruct one of the incredible musical stages in Rayman Legends. Playlist link to all episodes so far: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NYjlfL7dHCQ&list=PLBhIWrMLhhmowCQyCRaDEMWDH-l5lunnL Link to my channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCm4XW_MrNfZrjQkj9iuxK9A
  8. Free until Tuesday, our 1st children's app for iOS, Abigail's Tales: First Day Butterflies.
  9. Piano Extreme is a great application to learning piano. Now you can play the piano anytime, anywhere, simply by connecting a computer keyboard to your smartphone via the USB OTG cable. In addition, the application also has a database of more than 650,000 songs, so you can easily play a song quickly. You can even play a song on your phone or directly connect to the Organ to practice. ★★★ Key Features ★★★ ✔ Full piano keyboard with 88 keys ✔ Supports a wide variety of keyboard instruments (Piano, Grand Piano, Pipe Organ, Harpsichord, Accordion, Electric Guitar, Harp, Cello Pizzicato, Guzheng, Nylon Guitar, Plucked String, Music Box, Sitar, Xylophone, Harp, Vibes, Clarinet, Ukulele, Brass, Thai Bells, Tabbla, Dizi, Banjo, Flute, Saxophone, Cellto, Hamonica, Trumpet, Violin, Panpipe, Maracas, Tuba, Dulcimer, Kalimba,...) ✔ Multi play modes help you practice more easily: Piano Tiles, Piano Keyboard, USB Keyboard, Sheet number & sheet notes ✔ Dual piano keyboard with full feature make playing music easier ✔ Support Sheet number & sheet notes with auto scroll ✔ Recording your song ✔ Connect and play on the computer keyboard ✔ Support the keyboard types on Everyone Piano✔ There are more than 650,000+ songs for you to practice Video: https://youtu.be/-9r36UOE7-k Download: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=eop.everyone.piano.usb.keyboard&hl=en-us For any questions, please visit our Fanpage: https://www.facebook.com/PianoExtreme
  10. Dear GameDevs, I am plan on creating a video game. However, before I start creating the game, I would like to interview a game developer to understand a bit about the whole process of creating a game. The interview will be conducted via Skype video call or Skype Chat (I can also do discord) and will be very short (5-10 minutes). I want to interview any game developer (beginner or experienced). Regards, Shreyas Edit 1: Grammer
  11. So you're a filmmaker entering post-production on your film, a game developer working on music and audio triggers or perhaps a YouTuber wanting to enhance your videos. You need SFX and a music soundtrack but you might not have the budget to hire a professional composer or audio engineer. The question is: Can you still have a great commercial soundtrack and great SFX for your project utilizing only free resources? Definitely. Quick story about why I am writing this article: My career is in electronic music production, but I also love game design and have always wanted to create my own video game, so 2 years ago I decided to produce my first interactive horror visual novel. I was designing everything in-house: music, SFX, graphics, writing, everything. Many of you reading this are probably quite similar to me and are doing most of the work for your project yourself. I could handle the music, the writing, and the code, but there was no avoiding the obvious fact that I was terrible at drawing and I did not have the field-recording equipment necessary to record my own sound effects. I also did not have the budget to hire an audio engineer or an artist to provide me with SFX and the artwork needed for the game, so I had a dilemma. How do I immerse the player in my story without quality sound effects, artwork, and no budget to pay for them? Well, I did what I always do when I have a problem that seems impossible to overcome: I asked the internet. I spent days researching online and long story short I found dozens of websites providing free commercially-usable resources for my project. And imagine my surprise when a few of these free resources...didn't suck! Not only did I end up finishing my game without spending a penny, but I could still sell it! So I got to thinking, what about filmmakers, game developers, and YouTubers who already have great video and artwork but need great music and SFX? Are there equally-powerful free music libraries out there to search and download from? I did my research and once again found some incredible resources that I am going to share with you now! And not just that, but I'm going to help you incorporate and edit these free resources so they don't sound like you just downloaded them off random websites online. Here's what we are going to cover: Where to obtain free, commercially usable music & SFX for your project without sacrificing the quality of your end-product How to edit music and SFX you downloaded from widely different sources to create a unified soundtrack that works with your project How to create loops, fade-ins, fade-outs and layer audio to immerse the audience Licensing, what it means and what restrictions you have when using these resources (not many, I promise) How to change the format of your audio to work with your software Where to find volunteers or paid professionals if you can't find what you need So without boring you to death, let's get started with the best 9 websites to download free, commercially-usable music & SFX! TOP 5 FREE COMMERCIALLY USABLE MUSIC LIBRARIES: (For SFX, Keep Scrolling) JordanWinslow.me - My Personal Library of Hundreds of Electronic & Orchestral Soundtracks Arranged by Category for Free Download - License: Free Commercial Use With Attribution (See Terms of Service on Website) As I said before, I have been producing electronic music for over 14 years now, 5 years of which it has been my primary source of income. So I wanted to put together my own free resource for others to benefit from! These are some of my absolute best soundtracks, many of which are loopable. And I spent many days organizing them by category and mood to make it easier for you to find what you're looking for! And the best thing is, all of the tracks can be listened to without even leaving the page and can be easily downloaded in 1 click! Icons8 - Incredibly Well-Sorted, Professional Library of Hundreds of Songs from Various Artists - License: “Free for a Link” (See Website) Don’t be fooled by this company’s origin: They started off as graphic designers who made icons, thus Icons8. But they have evolved and got their hands on a rather large music library of various artists who have been curated by their team. Naturally, when a library is curated, it is subjective and therefore might not be to your tastes if you disagree with how they select their tracks for inclusion on their website, but it can’t hurt to take a look at their gallery since it is so incredibly well-sorted! Incompetech - A Classic Library of a Few Hundred Songs Ranging from Classic Rock to Jazz - License: Primarily Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 Incompetech has been around for quite some time and is recommended by many other bloggers because it provides a convenient category system. Unfortunately, the tracks are not organized by mood or tonal characteristics other than genre, so you will find tracks with the instruments you are looking for, but it may take some digging to find the appropriate mood you are looking for. dig cc mixter - A Massive Library of Non-Categorized Music Submitted by Various Artists - License: Primarily Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 Unfortunately dig cc mixter, though a MASSIVE resource with tons of great tracks, is not a great place to find music in the specific genre you are looking for as there are no categories and no search functions to speak of. If you are willing to spend the time looking through thousands of tracks though, you will find a few hidden gems on here that will fit perfectly in your project! Josh Woodward - 200+ Primarily Acoustic & Electric Guitar Driven Songs - License: Commercial Use With Attribution (See Website for Terms) The best part about Josh Woodward’s free commercially usable library is that he has tagged each and every song with different moods, themes, and styles to make it very easy for Filmmakers, Game Developers & Artists to search through tracks to find songs in the mood they are looking for! Honorable Mention: Partners in Rhyme - A Little Over 100 Free Unsorted Music Loops - License: Free for a “Thanks” or With Attribution (Vague, See Terms on Website) This library is more of a last resort as the tracks are unsorted and not as high quality as others on this list, however free is free and these tracks would be suitable for app developers or creators who are looking for this type of sound. TOP 3 FREE COMMERCIALLY USABLE SFX LIBRARIES: ZapSplat - 27,000+ Searchable Sound Effects Recorded by Professionals - License: Free Commercial Use With Attribution ZapSplat is by far my favorite free SFX resource. When I first discovered their website it had far fewer audio files and a much less appealing logo design. It appears they are dedicated to growth because they have completely redesigned their branding and added thousands of audio clips to their website! I personally used this resource in the development of my Horror Visual Novel titled “The Watchers.” Soundeffects+ - Over 5000 Free Sound Effects Sorted by 16 Categories - License: Free Commercial Use With Attribution (See Website for More Details) Soundeffects+ offers a large library sorted by the categories visible in the screenshot above. See something you’re looking for? Click the link and go check it out. Otherwise, keep scrolling! Videvo - 400 Free Sound Effects Sorted by Over 20 Categories - License: Complicated, each sound effect has it’s own license and it varies. Check each sound page for the license. Videvo is primarily a stock video provider with many free video clips, but they are also breaking into sound as well and have an expanding library of 440 clips which isn’t much but they are very well sorted so it should be easy to find something unique for your project. Make sure you check their licensing page as their licensing is quite complex compared to other websites. In the above 9 websites, you should be able to obtain all of the sound effects and music for your project as long as you are willing to put in the time filtering and searching through these libraries to find what you are looking for. It may seem like a daunting task, but I have done it personally myself in my game development and have had great success! My suggestion to you is download anything that sounds interesting to you at the time, even if you are unsure if you can use it in your project or not, and copy-paste the license information into a .txt file so you don’t forget to give proper attribution. Part 2: How to Choose the Right Music & SFX for Each Scene, and How to Edit Audio to Achieve Your Goals Once you have a selection of songs or SFX for your project it's time to edit. Since most of you will be using many different types of software I am only going to cover how to edit music in 3rd party FREE software, namely Audacity. Don't knock it, Audacity is very powerful software and unless you're considering a career in audio engineering, music production, sound design or mixing, this is probably the only tool you'll ever need. If you want more professional audio editing tools I highly suggest iZotope's RX6 software as it allows you to do incredible things such as take backgrounds out of one scene and move them into another, repair poor recordings and dubbing, and more. How to loop music that wasn't originally recorded as a loop: To achieve this the easiest method is to create a soft fade-in and fade-out on the track. You can experiment with different values but 1-2 seconds on each end usually suffices unless the music is louder or more complex, then you can try up to 4 seconds on each end or even more for atmospheric loops. Here is an easy to follow video tutorial on fade-ins, fade-outs and looping audio: https://youtu.be/ryLpfVecUDs How to make everything sound cohesive, as if everything was designed specifically for your project: Keep in mind, layering audio is an incredibly easy, yet very powerful tool at your disposal. You can loop one audio track while another one continues to play underneath it to keep the player from noticing the loop. You can even create elaborate scenes with chattering people, blowing wind, ambient tones, and musical accompaniment. All of these types of atmospheres can be downloaded at the above free resources! It is important to consider the stylistic and tonal changes of the music you downloaded when switching from one song to another. Don't just go from a percussive action track straight into a somber atmospheric melody. Transitioning is key: utilize fade-ins and fade-outs during most, if not all of your audio changes so the experience draws the audience further into your story rather than taking their focus off the screen and into the audio. Oh yeah, and... Epic Music Does Not Make a Boring Scene More Epic! I think there is a huge problem in the video game industry specifically (filmmakers don't scoff, it's a problem in your industry too, but perhaps less pronounced) where game developers think if they make the music louder and louder and more and more epic it will somehow make the game more fun or the experience more immersive. Well, it doesn't. Many times have I been playing through a game or watching a film where the audio is 10X more dramatic than what is happening on screen and it makes me just want to mute it or turn it down. This is not the experience you want to give your audience, trust me. Consider the emotion of every scene before you place any music and ensure that listening to the music by itself gives you the feeling you want the player to have, but don't expect the music and sound effects to do the work for you on making the scene enjoyable and immersive! Once you have a rough draft of your soundtrack & SFX library, go back to Step 1 and make SURE you didn’t miss any audio that may be in other categories you didn’t listen to that might fit the scenes you’re working on. Part 3: Obtain the Appropriate License to Use the Music & SFX and Ensure You Have Given Proper Attribution Whenever you’re working with royalty free music & SFX you always have to keep in mind that just because the music is free doesn’t mean you don’t have to cite the author. For example, if you’re using my personal Royalty Free Music Catalog I linked to earlier then this part is very simple: If you will not make money from your project directly or indirectly (this includes advertisements and YouTube monetization) then all you have to do is put “Music Downloaded From https://JordanWinslow.Me/RoyaltyFreeMusic” in your credits, description or somewhere easily visible in your project. If you will make money from your project directly or indirectly, simply fill out the Commercial License Request Form found on the website and enter in the title of your project and your project’s information for EACH project you will require music for. All of the sites I linked above have very similar licensing agreements, so just read up on the individual website before you download, and ensure you create a .txt document with all the links you need so you don’t forget! The best part about all of the above libraries is that almost every song and SFX clip you download can be legally edited, looped, layered, remixed and changed any way you see fit! The only restriction is you cannot sell or distribute your edited or remixed audio clips as standalone clips if they were your own because technically the author still retains copyright ownership over the files. But that does not mean you can't sell your film or video game with the edited audio! If you are confused, double-check the licensing page on each website to be sure. And that’s how you spend time instead of money to create a custom soundtrack for your film, video game or YouTube video! What to Do if you Still Haven’t Found What You’re Looking For, or the Audio You Downloaded isn’t the Correct Format If the audio you downloaded isn’t in the correct format for your software, you can use the free open source tool Audacity to convert it by using the "Export" menu to change the format of your audio or use this free online audio converter. Keep in mind that certain audio formats like .mp3 have restrictions on where they can be used. I recommend .ogg since it is an open source audio format with great quality and compression. Now if for some reason you don’t find the music or SFX you need in those libraries of thousands of songs and SFX, it’s probably time to consider looking for a volunteer composer or simply hiring a professional. You can find low-cost audio engineers and composers on websites like Fiverr and Upwork, but keep in mind that quality products do not often come with low price tags, be wary of anything that seems "too good to be true" because it probably is. And be sure to listen to their portfolio thoroughly before making a decision! I know it’s not easy to make a career out of your passions when you’re on a limited budget, believe me, just read My Story if you want to know how I spent 6 years in poverty before becoming a successful electronic music producer & composer. But I guarantee if you put the time into finding music and SFX in the above libraries, or looking for a great volunteer, you can get your project done at no cost other than the hardware and software you purchased! If you have any questions, feel free to reach out to me any time! See you later, creators! Electronic Music Producer, Composer & Audio Engineer https://JordanWinslow.Me
  12. Hello future and present game designers! I've researched into this topic and even had an interview with a well-known composer about whether I should attend a music school. Acquiring the knowledge, contacts, and confidence in music makes attending one seem like a good choice. Also, would my school of choice matter in this decision? In my case, the University of Southern California is the more accredited school for video game designers, but the University of Irvine is closer to home (where I won't have to move away). Any advice is appreciated. Thanks.
  13. Hi! How do you calculate tournament timings in online games? For example, if it's morning here (everyone is awake) and if it's night on the other side of the planet (everyone is asleep), then how do you let players all around the world play the tournament? Is it that players have to select their country before starting a game and accordingly the tournament is created for each nation depending on their time zone? Can you give me some examples of games using different methods, if any? I hope you understand what I'm trying to ask here? Even I'm not sure if I asked the right question? Thanks!
  14. Hello once again to this entry to our devblog. This one will show the basics how we reworked the compound clouds to look - let's be honest - a lot better than they did before. The last version consisted of one class CompoundCloud which was represented by a procedural mesh component. That one started out as a simple cube and then offset the positions of the vertices by a randomly chosen amount between two previously chosen values. That looked... functional at best. And interaction with the player was pretty much not practical and computationally expensive. So the next idea we came up with was to make a cloud of sphere meshes and just have the player collect every one of those. This resulted in a new hierarchy. At the top there's still the CompoundCloud but it now has an array of Compound_ParticleComponents for its representation. Each one of those has a sphere mesh to handle collision and a particle system to look pretty. A short demo of the new system can be found here. We should probably start with the particle system. Not many steps requiered here. 1. Create a new particle system 2. Click on "Required" and in the first section ("Emitter") set a material (will be shown later) and the Screen Alignment to "PSA Rectangle" (this might not make a difference to the standard but it's set to that for our system). Then scroll down and set a cutout testure in the section "Particle Cutout". We used our heart icon you might have seen in one of our update videos. (we also changed the background color to something light so you can actually see what is happening) 3. Click an Spawn. There's a little more to do here. First of all set the rate in the "Spawn" section to "Distribution Float Uniform". Same for the rate scale. Play around with the values a bit or just take what we got there. Next set the particle burst method to interplated. The burst scale distribution should be "Distribution Float Particle Parameter". Once again play around with the values until you have something you like. 4. Go into "Lifetime" and set Min to 2 and Max to 1.1 (Again, once you're done with this tutorial just play around with this values) 5. Go to "Initial Velocity" and reduce the Min and Max values. We recommend between 2 for all Max and -2 for all Min. This will keep your particles closer together and not have them shoot in one direction. 6. Next up add a seeded initial location and set its bounds to something you like. 7. And the final step is to add a seeded sphere. You should now have something roughly looking like this. The Material: (absolutly nothing special) Now for the interesing part: The code. This is perfectly doable in blueprints, too but since we're mostly working in C++ I'll show how we solved it in code. I'm also only gonna show the constructors of the CompoundCloud class and the Compound_ParticleComponent class since this tutorial mostly deals with the look of the clouds. If you're interested in how any other part works just let me know and maybe I'll make a short explanation for that in the future. The code then: uint8 particleCount = StaticMaths::RR(CLOUD_PARTICLE_MIN, CLOUD_PARTICLE_MAX); We get a random value for the number particle systems we want to use. In our case this is our own function that simply determines a number between two other numbers. std::string center = "CenterSystem"; UCompound_ParticleComponent_Cell* temp = CreateDefaultSubobject<UCompound_ParticleComponent_Cell>(FName(center.c_str())); particles.Add(temp); RootComponent = temp; Then we set up the center component. All the other systems will circle around this one. This also functions as the rootComponent for the actor. The UCompound_ParticleComponent_Cell is the second class and we will deal with it later. for (uint8 i = 0; i < 100; i++) { for (int j = 0; j < pow(i, 2); j++) { //define the name for the current particle system //ParticleSystem_<circleNum>_<Num>_<randomSeed> std::string name = "ParticleSystem_"; name.append({ static_cast<char>((i + 1)) }); name.append({ "_" }); name.append({ static_cast<char>(j + 1) }); name.append({ "_" }); name.append({ static_cast<char>(j + i) }); //create the particle system with the newly defined name UCompound_ParticleComponent_Cell* temp = CreateDefaultSubobject<UCompound_ParticleComponent_Cell>(name.c_str()); particles.Add(temp); temp->SetupAttachment(RootComponent); //set up random location within a circle double a = (((double)rand() / (RAND_MAX)) + 1) * 2 * PI; double r = (CLOUD_RADIUS_STEPS * (i + 1)) * sqrt(((double)rand() / (RAND_MAX)) + 1); double x = r * cos(a); double y = r * sin(a); FVector location = FVector(x, y, 0); temp->SetRelativeLocation(location); //finally: check if number of elements in array is particle count //if so, stop this loop if (particleCount - 1 == particles.Num()) { break; i = 100; j = pow(i, 2); } } if (particleCount - 1 == particles.Num()) { break; i = 100; } } This part is where the magic happens. Basically we want to have somewhat circular shapes around the center system. So the outer for-loop with i counts the circles. The 100 is a dummy value since there will never be that many circles and it would be a waste of resources to actually calculate the true number of circles. We only need to know the number of particleComponents which is our particleCount. The inner loop with j counts from 0 to i to the power of 2. So on every circle there are i*i particleComponents. Next up is a bit of naming. Not really relevant. Then we create another particleComponent and add it to the actor and the array. What comes next might be interesting for some: this formular basically determines a random position on a circle. So we take (i + 1) times our pre-defined cloud radius steps to get the radius of our current circle and we have all the data we need. Everything else can be determined from that and a random number. Whe then set that location for the particleComponent. At the end of the inner loop we check if we already have all the particles we need. If so set i and j to their max values so the loops stop. This is why we didn't need to calculate how many circles there will be when we start the loops. Don't worry, the particleComponent involves less maths. //instantiate mesh component and particle system component particleSystem = CreateDefaultSubobject<UParticleSystemComponent>(TEXT("ParticleSystem")); mesh = CreateDefaultSubobject<UStaticMeshComponent>(TEXT("Mesh")); particleSystem->SetupAttachment(this); mesh->SetupAttachment(this); //Collision binding mesh->bGenerateOverlapEvents = true; mesh->OnComponentBeginOverlap.AddDynamic(this, &UCompound_ParticleComponent_Cell::BeginOverlap); mesh->OnComponentEndOverlap.AddDynamic(this, &UCompound_ParticleComponent_Cell::EndOverlap); We create default subobject for the mesh and the particles system and then bind the collision functions. Easy as that. //get the mesh and set it auto meshAsset = ConstructorHelpers::FObjectFinder<UStaticMesh>(TEXT("StaticMesh'/Game/Meshes/ball.ball'")); if (meshAsset.Object != nullptr) { mesh->SetStaticMesh(meshAsset.Object); mesh->SetVisibility(false); mesh->RelativeScale3D = FVector(5.f); } else { Logging::Log("Could not find Asset 'ball' at path in Compound_ParticleComponent_Cell"); } Then we load the mesh and set it. We also scales up the sphere mesh since it turned out to be way too small and the player would miss it a lot of the time. (That Logging::Log there doesn't really concern you. It's a function we wrote that simple writes a message into a file and onto the screen. Helpful for debugging. I left it in there for this tutorial because I think you should always have something in your code tell you when something goes wrong.) //get the needed particle system and set it in the component try { //static ConstructorHelpers::FObjectFinder<UParticleSystem> psAsset(TEXT("ParticleSystem'/Game/ParticleSystems/PS_CompoundCloud_SingleCelled.PS_CompoundCloud_SingleCelled'")); auto psAsset = ConstructorHelpers::FObjectFinderOptional<UParticleSystem>(TEXT("ParticleSystem'/Game/ParticleSystems/PS_CompoundCloud.PS_CompoundCloud'")); if (psAsset.Succeeded()) { particleSystemType = psAsset.Get(); particleSystem->SetTemplate(particleSystemType); } else { Logging::Log("Could not find Asset 'PS_CompoundCloud_SingleCelled' at path in Compound_ParticleComponent_Cell"); } //particleSystem->Template = particleSystemType; } catch (int e) { Logging::Log("Could not find Asset 'PS_CompoundCloud_SingleCelled' at path in Compound_ParticleComponent_Cell\nCause: FObjectFinder Access Violation"); Logging::Log(e); } We had some trouble loading particleSystems this way so I left in both ways to do it and the try-catch block in case one of you might have a similar problem. So that's basically it. Bye and keep on evolving.
  15. Wojtek Mos

    Game Industry Conference

    until
    With more than 3.200 attendees, over 500 visiting companies, 121 talks and plenty of B2B opportunities, Game Industry Conference is the biggest game dev event in Central and Eastern Europe. Set to run for three days plus the side events day, the conference brings together the industry experts, professionals and important figures, providing them with an environment where they can make connections, exchange knowledge and present their ideas. Game Industry Conference takes place alongside the Poznan Game Arena, one of the most important and largest game expos in Europe. Over 71.000 visitors enjoy the show by testing games and hardware from more than 130 expositors. The two events form a significant gateway into the Central and Eastern Europe video game industry as well as the best place to meet most of the people from the Polish game industry, which, with more than 400 studios and 5.000 people working in games development, is one of the most dynamic and fastest-growing industries in the region.
  16. Georgia Game Developers Association announced CIMFest 2018 for July 14! This weekend, on July 14th, the Georgia Game Developers Association is holding their third annual Columbus Interactive Media Festival (CIMFest). This event is a yearly programmed event that brings together a variety game industry talents throughout the heart of Georgia and looking to support the growing network of southern game developers and students throughout the region. CIMFest is a single day event hosted by Columbus State University, held at the Student Davidson Center. Check-in will start around 9AM EST and will conclude around 6PM EST. CIMFest will be featuring guest speakers like Chris Patterson, owner of Bricks and Minifigs in Columbus; Jesse James Allen, editorial director at Falcon’s Creative Group, a theme park and interactive design studio in Orlando; and Joe Cassavaugh, the CEO, designer and engineer of Puzzles by Joe. “We have seen a significant interest in both digital entertainment and video game development from the Columbus area. CIMFest is the perfect opportunity for students and professional developers alike to increase their skills and reach. Anyone interested in game development would benefit from going,” said Andrew Greenberg, Executive Director of the Georgia Game Developers Association. This event is open to the public but offers lower rates for GGDA members, Students (School ID required), and CSU Alumni. All attendees will receive full access to all programming associated with this event. Registration is available here for this event, payment will be acquired at the door upon arrival. More information on scheduled speakers and sessions can be found at the official site for the Georgia Game Developers Association.
  17. Georgia Game Developers Association announced CIMFest 2018 for July 14! This weekend, on July 14th, the Georgia Game Developers Association is holding their third annual Columbus Interactive Media Festival (CIMFest). This event is a yearly programmed event that brings together a variety game industry talents throughout the heart of Georgia and looking to support the growing network of southern game developers and students throughout the region. CIMFest is a single day event hosted by Columbus State University, held at the Student Davidson Center. Check-in will start around 9AM EST and will conclude around 6PM EST. CIMFest will be featuring guest speakers like Chris Patterson, owner of Bricks and Minifigs in Columbus; Jesse James Allen, editorial director at Falcon’s Creative Group, a theme park and interactive design studio in Orlando; and Joe Cassavaugh, the CEO, designer and engineer of Puzzles by Joe. “We have seen a significant interest in both digital entertainment and video game development from the Columbus area. CIMFest is the perfect opportunity for students and professional developers alike to increase their skills and reach. Anyone interested in game development would benefit from going,” said Andrew Greenberg, Executive Director of the Georgia Game Developers Association. This event is open to the public but offers lower rates for GGDA members, Students (School ID required), and CSU Alumni. All attendees will receive full access to all programming associated with this event. Registration is available here for this event, payment will be acquired at the door upon arrival. More information on scheduled speakers and sessions can be found at the official site for the Georgia Game Developers Association. View full story
  18. Some thoughts about ECS Part 1: Unity ECS - briefly about ecs Part 2: Unity ECS - project design Part 3: Unity ECS - operations on Entities Part 4: Unity ECS - ECS and Jobs The rule of thumb explanation How does ComponentSystem often look like: public class SomeSystem : ComponentSystem { private struct Group { public readonly int Length; public EntityArray Entities; public ComponentDataArray<SomeComponent> SomeComponents; } [Inject] private Group m_group; // Inject the group entities with given components protected override void OnUpdate() { float dt = Time.deltaTime; // Nice cached deltaTime, we're on main thread, so we can use Unity's API for (int i = 0; i < m_group.Length; i++) { // some operates on data } } // System was enabled (ComponentSystemBase.Enabled = true) protected override void OnStartRunning() { // probably some more caches for optimization, preparation for Updates } // System was disabled (ComponentSystemBase.Enabled = false) protected override void OnStopRunning() { // probably some clean up } } Let's take a look at this first: struct Group { public readonly int Length; public EntityArray Entities; public ComponentDataArray<Foo> Foos; public ComponentDataArray<Bar> Bars; } What is group? Group is filter of all Entities in active world that have Foo and Bar component It's like array of matching entities with references to all specific given components. So, group is like EntityArray but with references to components, EntityArray itself is just array of Entities (and entity is just an index). Group is constructed with a set of required components, subtractive components. It's also synced. Why do we have Length field? Isn't Foos.Length the same? Yes, you are rigth! They're the same. Length is length of EntityArray, so also Length of Foos and Bars, because each entity has Foo and Bar component It's more obvious in this case: for(int i; i < m_group.Length; i++) { // Using m_group.Foos.Length or m_group.Bar.Length would be a bit confusing in this case // because we iterate over all entities and can get access to ANY of their components } To summarize - every array in injected group would have same Length, because it's length of Entities and each entity has every given component. Separation of Length field is just for convenience. How to manage indexing? The injection magic. for(int i; i < m_group.Length; i++) // iterate over all entities from group { // It's safe to iterate like that, because every array in group has the same length // and indexing is also injected(synced) in that way to use it exactly like this: var actualEntity = m_group.Entities[i]; // Actual iterating Entity var actualFoo = m_group.Foos[i]; // Foo component "attached" to actualEntity var actualBar = m_group.Bards[i]; // Bar component "attached" to actualEntity } How do I manage lifetime of systems? Well, you don't really need to! Unity takes care about that. Systems track injected groups and will be disabled if there are no matching Entities and will be enabled if there appears one as well. But if you really want to, take a look upwards, see OnStartRunning and OnStopRunning ? I mentioned ComponentSystemBase.Enabled = true which is probably what are you looking for. It's property that allows you to active/disable system manually. Systems don't update in order I want Convenience attributes for rescue! Since all systems are updated on the main thread, you need to think about order of updates, there are some attributes to help you with it: [UpdateAfter(typeof(OtherSystem))], [UpdateBefore(typeof(OtherSystem))], [UpdateInGroup(typeof(UpdateGroup))] where UpdateGroup is empty class. You can even control update before/after Unity's phases by typeof(UnityEngine.Experimental.PlayerLoop.FixedUpdate) or other phases in same namespace. How can I get access to system I want? You can just inject it just like [Inject] private YourSystem yourSystem; easy as that. You can also use World.Active.GetExistingManager<YourSystem>() or if you're not sure if it exists but it should, use World.Active.GetOrCreateManager<YourSystem>() Why to use EntityArray in system? What can I do with this index? Since systems most often operates on components, not directly on entities, it raises question "Why do I even need this index". Saying "it's just and index" doesn't mean that is not usable at all. It's very important integer. If you haven't tried Unity's ECS implementation, you probably don't know where is it needed. It's needed among others for functionality from EntityManager that holds EntityData and controls adding/removing (and much more) components from a given entity. But actually you don't want to add/remove components via EntityManager. You'd rather do it after update to not break the group (you'll get error about accessing deallocated nativearray), so you want to use PostUpdateCommands (EntityCommandBuffer). More about that in one of futures part of article. World vs EntityManager EntityManager is not weird, magic class, it's ScriptBehaviourManager and "merges" entities and their components. In ECS we have a lot of managers. ComponentSystem is also ScriptBehaviourManager ! World holds all managers in one piece. We could colloquially say it manages the managers. I know what's your question - yes, we can create multiple worlds, sounds interesting, isn't it? Maybe we'll take a look at this in future. ComponentData and SharedComponentData. What's the difference? The difference is trivial, ComponentData is just a component, SharedComponentData is as it says, component shared between different Entities. Very good explanation you can read in docs: So, with same IComponentData (eg. Position) changes from Entity0 won't change Position from Entity1, ut with same SharedComponent (eg. Renderer) if you change material from Entity0, it'll change also material from Entity1. However you don't really want to change SharedComponents a lot, actually very rarely. More details THERE. Well, there is one more difference - ComponentData have to be blittable. Oryginally published at: https://connect.unity.com/p/part-1-unity-ecs-briefly-about-ecs Go further: Part 2: Unity ECS - project design Give me some feedback in comment section, don't worry I won't hate you if you show me some "anomaly" in my article. If you enjoy my article - like it and follow me. It'll motivate me to write more articles. See you.
  19. Armaan Gupta

    Lets build cool things!

    Hi there, My name is Armaan and our game studio my company started, The Creative Games, is looking for talented people to join. Art, development, code, audio, design... whatever you do, we would love to have you. As of now were working to get more people to really get a diverse set of inputs. Were not focused on a "type" of games, really just whatever we as a team want to make. If you want to be a part of a team working on building cool things, email me at armaangupta01@gmail.com or text me on my Discord (Guppy#7625). Can't wait to have you join!
  20. The Big GameDev AMA Series Who and what would you ask if you had the chance to ask renowned game developers and producers? Write it in a reply. Now you can ask the man who introduced Tetris to the western world or the man who launched Tomb Raider in ’96 or the man who designed Disney’s Aladdin and worked on the mobile versions of Plants vs. Zombies, or the man who designed Total Annihilation, Dungeon Siege and Supreme Commander. Or the man who got SEGA to spend millions on advertising one of their games, or a producer who has successfully shipped to market over 70 titles. Check https://moleman4.com/ama/ for details.
  21. I've checked this video: Surface Tension: Liquid Effects in The Last of Us. But after watching the video, I have difficulty imagine the way to create these blood effect. So he said the blood has 2 parts: Animation & Shading So here I imagine (I'm not an expert so the chance I imagine wrong is very high) The animation part, you can use Adobe After Effect & Photoshop to create, I think the final result is a particle effect: 1. Get a green screen blood effect video --> BloodFx.mp4 2. [BloodFx.mp4] --> [Adobe Photoshop] --> Images files. Then use Photoshop and some other program to tailor the images files, check the video in the spoiler below (I put it in the spoiler in case the image of the video too large for this page) About the shading part. I vaguely imagine like this: 1. Write shading script (HLSL) 2. Use a sculpt software to sculpt the blood and use XNormal to generate the Normals. But how can this work with the particle effect from the first part? What is this blood, it's 2d sprite particle effect or it's liquid entity (like water, the sea or the whisky you can see in Micheal's glass in GTA V). What software require to make this blood effect? Thanks for reading.
  22. Corbbin Goldsmith

    Marketing I'm writing about games!

    Hi, everyone, For the last month, I've been building out my news site for developers of all sorts, and I cover games, apps, web apps, SaaS, you name it! If you want to have an article written about your game, contact me so I can get started! Requirements: A "playable" game A good idea behind it Um, that's about it. Just send me a message through my site. Articles I've written: https://www.theinspectorpress.com/news/dreamscape-168-z-run https://www.theinspectorpress.com/news/unlok-wayward
  23. Timmmmmmmmmm.. T

    Double Fine Quest

    MY QUEST: I found out about Double Fine through your a podcast in 2012. Fast forward six years, I’m a student game developer giving it all I have for a job there. So, I checked their “Action Jobs” page to see what I could find. Under "We are always recruiting everybody, all the time" there is a short story about what happens when you get a job there. http://www.doublefine.com/jobs Also featured on this fabulous brochure. Last summer, I decided I wanted a job there, but they must have interns banging on their windows, so how could I stand out? I decided to make a game that would have several sections to demonstrate my ability and show that I would work hard. Last Fall, I learned Unity through my University. Every single project I made was either a part of my Double Fine game, or specifically designed so that I could reuse code for my Double Fine game. Around December I realized it would be awesome to go to GDC. The main reason being that I could speak to people from Double Fine and make an impression. It was too late to sign up as a GDC volunteer, passes were over $1k, but someone told me about the Unity Student Scholarship. I didn't have a proper portfolio, but I uploaded my work from my Unity class and any other Unity projects I had. Even without a portfolio, I tried to make it look good. I spent so long on the application process that I was late to a New Years Eve party. The new year came, and my game that would get me into Double Fine, codenamed "Project Sourdough," was not on schedule. It would never be completed on time, although parts of it were a complete mess. Since Sourdough didn't have time to rise properly, I needed to make a more concise experience very rapidly. I reused as much code as I could to make "Project Unleavened," a game that follows the story on Double Fine's “Action Jobs” page. Time passed. I really wanted to go to GDC. One night, I prayed that I would go, even though it was unlikely. I also prayed that if I didn't go, they would at least tell me soon, so I could stop thinking about it. The very next moment, I pulled out my phone to call someone, and an e-mail popped up on the lock screen from Unity folks. "Thank you for submitting... We received a lot of high quality applications ... Unfortunately, you were not chosen as a recipient ... But we were impressed with your application" and they gave me a limited access pass. I was completely in awe. SO I WAS GOING TO GDC! The next thing I needed was a way to give them the game. I designed a one-sided business card reminiscent of an atari cartridge, and had it printed onto two USB Business cards from VistaPrint. I had a lot of work to do on Unleavened. I put in some crazy hours in the weeks leading up to GDC, and had to either solve or work around countless issues. Unfortunately, due to a quirk in my dialogue system, I could only build for Windows at the time. Fortunately, I did get some help from my friends. I found out one of them is a QA guru. Another one could make great drawings, and it was amazing seeing him bring a piece of the game to life. But their time was limited by their own schoolwork, so I did all the coding and most of the art myself. That said, I can’t understate the importance of my friends and family during development. The final week of crunch on Monday, my phone died. It got hot, the battery drained quickly, and then it would not boot up. I've had it for years, so it was at end-of-life, but the week before flying across the country was a bad time to bite the dust. If nothing else, Verizon knows how to sell phones. I got my hands on a Pixel 2 before the week was out. Crisis averted, but it took the entire day to resolve that one. Tuesday, I referenced DF’s Jobs page. It had changed. I had been planning to apply for an internship, but there was a brand new note. “Alas, we are unable to offer internships pretty much ever, sorry!” That could be the end of the story. But it’s not. If I couldn't be an intern, I’d apply for a full position as a Gameplay Programmer. I programmed, built, tested, rinsed, repeated until it was error-free. After all that testing I copied those files onto the two business cards. I took a few hours off Sunday night before GDC to hang out with friends. Unfortunately, I needed more than two business cards for GDC, so I got back to work around eleven to design some normal ones. I lied down for a moment and fell asleep for three hours, woke up at 5 AM and then sent my design to the local Minuteman Press. The next morning, there was no next morning, I woke up at noon. I ran about a mile to the printer to get those business cards, and began to pack ASAP. (Disclaimer: That's not San Francisco ) I had a friend who was on-time to bring me to the airport, but I was too far behind packing, and missed the flight Monday. They rescheduled me for free since the next flights had open seats. I was stuck at the airport for hours, exhausted, but Tuesday afternoon I finally made it to San Francisco. Double Fine runs a booth called "Day of the Devs" which showcases a few selected indie games. I hung out there for hours trying to find one of them. I met plenty of good people, but I missed their main producer (Greg Rice) by literally a minute. Wednesday night was an awards ceremony, and the Tim Schafer got a big one. I waited twenty minutes after the show until the people from that company started walking out, and caught up to Greg Rice when he separated from the rest of them. "Mister Rice, can I talk to you for a minute?" "I'm really really late, I can't talk now." "Can you at least take this?" And I handed him one of the USB Business cards with my resume and the game on it. He ran away screaming. Well, not really, he just walked away quickly. THE HUNT CONTINUED, Thursday, I finally got lucky at Double Fine's booth. While scanning badges, I saw some tiny print. It said "Double Fine Productions." Whoah. I looked up, and saw he was wearing a shiny Double Fine pin. It was beautiful. I looked at his face, and he was talking to someone else. I awkwardly stood by until he was free, and then told him my story before relinquishing the second USB Business card. Package 2 delivered! Delivered to a Communications Manager, no less! Friday I walked out of a building and saw some people in Double Fine branded clothes ==> I orbited around in front of them, and introduced myself to two more DF people (programmers). They really liked the idea of my game, so I gave them my card and told then where to find it online. Saturday I applied to Double Fine thru their web site, the normal way, except that I included a link to the game. Monday, the Communications Manager sent me an e-mail that the game didn't work. I know exactly the issue and exactly why. I sent both the fix and a working version. Which brings us to today. Here is the game I made: https://sonictimm.itch.io/action-resume Playtime is usually less than ten minutes. I did modify my dialogue system for web, so you can play it in your browser. Experience Points: (AKA fancier way to say TL;DR) I'd love to say that you can work hard for your dream job, but at this point I have no idea if I'll get the job. What if I don't get the job. I poured my life into a project for a [possibly] failed endeavor. I still gained: -A portfolio. -A trip to GDC -Lots of contacts from said trip -Some free time in San Francisco -TONS of Unity Experience -Practice writing. I love writing, but it's hard to sit down and do it. -Practice Art-ing. I love UI, but spritework is not my calling. -A chance to collab with some friends -A game that may or may not be fun, I'll let you guys decide -This crazy story. Honestly, the University feels mundane after all this... This list is getting crazy long.. But seriously, if your project fails, you'll probably learn more than if it succeeds. That said, don't ever strive for failure. Study Failure. Look at why things don't work, learn from other people's mistakes. Everyone learns from success, myself included. (I'm not the first person to try and get into a company by making a game...) Anyway, I'd love to get your feedback. If you can spare ten minutes, I'd love to hear what you think of my game. Also, if you have any tips for getting noticed by a game company / making yourself more employable, I'd love to hear those as well. Cheers!
  24. My bestselling and highly recommended Unity book has been fully revised! Unity in Action, Second Edition teaches you to write and deploy games with the Unity game development platform. You'll master the Unity toolset from the ground up, adding the skills you need to go from application coder to game developer.Foreword by Jesse Schell, author of The Art of Game DesignDon't take my word for it being good, look at the sky-high ratings on GoodReads.You can order the ebook directly from the publisher's site, or order the book on Amazon to get both the physical book and a coupon to download the ebook!
  25. Hi, I am currently a college student studying to become a Game Developer. I need to interview current game developers for a class I'm taking. if anyone seeing this could answer just the 5 questions that I have provided below as well as your name, current position, and how many years you've been in the game industry. I'd really appreciate any responses. Name: Position: Year in the industry: What was the starting salary? How many hours do you work? What did you learn outside of school that was useful? How did you get your job and how hard was it to find it? how was this job different than you expected it to be? Thank you for your time. -Alex Daughters
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