Jump to content
  • Advertisement

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Gameplay'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Categories

  • Audio
    • Music and Sound FX
  • Business
    • Business and Law
    • Career Development
    • Production and Management
  • Game Design
    • Game Design and Theory
    • Writing for Games
    • UX for Games
  • Industry
    • Interviews
    • Event Coverage
  • Programming
    • Artificial Intelligence
    • General and Gameplay Programming
    • Graphics and GPU Programming
    • Engines and Middleware
    • Math and Physics
    • Networking and Multiplayer
  • Visual Arts
  • Archive

Categories

  • Audio
  • Visual Arts
  • Programming
  • Writing

Categories

  • Game Dev Loadout
  • Game Dev Unchained

Categories

  • Game Developers Conference
    • GDC 2017
    • GDC 2018
  • Power-Up Digital Games Conference
    • PDGC I: Words of Wisdom
    • PDGC II: The Devs Strike Back
    • PDGC III: Syntax Error

Forums

  • Audio
    • Music and Sound FX
  • Business
    • Games Career Development
    • Production and Management
    • Games Business and Law
  • Game Design
    • Game Design and Theory
    • Writing for Games
  • Programming
    • Artificial Intelligence
    • Engines and Middleware
    • General and Gameplay Programming
    • Graphics and GPU Programming
    • Math and Physics
    • Networking and Multiplayer
  • Visual Arts
    • 2D and 3D Art
    • Critique and Feedback
  • Community
    • GameDev Challenges
    • GDNet+ Member Forum
    • GDNet Lounge
    • GDNet Comments, Suggestions, and Ideas
    • Coding Horrors
    • Your Announcements
    • Hobby Project Classifieds
    • Indie Showcase
    • Article Writing
  • Affiliates
    • NeHe Productions
    • AngelCode
  • Topical
    • Virtual and Augmented Reality
    • News
  • Workshops
    • C# Workshop
    • CPP Workshop
    • Freehand Drawing Workshop
    • Hands-On Interactive Game Development
    • SICP Workshop
    • XNA 4.0 Workshop
  • Archive
    • Topical
    • Affiliates
    • Contests
    • Technical
  • GameDev Challenges's Topics
  • For Beginners's Forum

Calendars

  • Community Calendar
  • Games Industry Events
  • Game Jams
  • GameDev Challenges's Schedule

Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.

Product Groups

  • Advertisements
  • GameDev Gear

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


About Me


Website


Role


Twitter


Github


Twitch


Steam

Found 450 results

  1. Hello all I want to use the right analog stick of my gamepad for throwing a rect based on the angle and intensity I flicked the analog stick. So if I flick the analog stick a little to the right, the less force is applied to the rect's rigidbody velocity property. I should be able to move the character left and right and also toss this rect at the same time. A good example of this gameplay mechanic would be Skate (xbox360). Granted, Skate is a lot more complex and 3D, and I just want to toss a rect. So far, I've kind of figured it out, but incredibly dissatisfied with the results. I'm able to to get the direction of my flick, but it's so sensitive, sometimes I repeatedly toss the rect completely upwards. I also don't feel so much control over strength I toss the rect. Long story short, I don't feel as much control over my flick functionality The functionality is only one script, If any of you have suggestions on improving this functionality it would be greatly appreciated. I'll share the code below, you can also download this little project. Its made for playing with a gamepad though. thanks in advance! using System.Collections; using System.Collections.Generic; using UnityEngine; public class Player : MonoBehaviour { [SerializeField] private GameObject boxObject; private Rigidbody2D rigidbody; private Vector2 leftInput; private Vector2 rightInput; private float timeFlicking = 0.0f; // Flags private bool flicking = false; private void Start() { rigidbody = GetComponent<Rigidbody2D>(); } private void Update() { // Will use later if (flicking) timeFlicking += Time.deltaTime; leftInput = new Vector2(Input.GetAxis("Horizontal"), Input.GetAxis("Vertical")); rightInput = new Vector2(Input.GetAxis("Right Horizontal"), Input.GetAxis("Right Vertical")); float rightInputMagnitude = rightInput.magnitude; // No Analog Stick movement and make sure we're not flicking already if (rightInput != Vector2.zero && !flicking) { Debug.Log("Flicking!"); CreateBox(); flicking = true; } if (rightInput == Vector2.zero) { if (flicking) { flicking = false; } } Vector2 newVelocity = leftInput * new Vector2(10, 10); newVelocity.y = 0; rigidbody.velocity = newVelocity; } private void CreateBox () { GameObject box = Instantiate(boxObject, transform.position, Quaternion.identity); Rigidbody2D rb = box.GetComponent<Rigidbody2D>(); Vector2 dir = rightInput.normalized; box.transform.position = (Vector2) box.transform.position + dir; // I should scale this new velocity vector with the magnitude of my rightInput vector? rb.velocity = rightInput * new Vector2(40, 40); } } Project (6mbs): https://files.fm/u/ru8p9rgs
  2. Hello everyone, I am starting today a new blog called Mobile Indie Spotlight where I will be interviewing mobile indie developers from around the world in an effort to make their stories heard and share their knowledge and experience with others. In these interviews we will be discussing around product and game design, gamification techniques, a/b testing, monetization strategies, localization, app store optimization, social mechanisms, user acquisition and other useful techniques that can help mobile app publishers design and ship better mobile apps on different app stores. Below you can find the first interview with Jacky Chou and his app Pluck it! Any feedback or suggestions are more than welcome! https://medium.com/@vourkosa/mobile-indie-spotlight-episode-1-pluck-it-a50faa281033
  3. Hi everybody, Xilvan Design are building 3D games since 2004 in Blitz3D, our kindly official gaming related pages. (please click on each links, download games & bookmark the pages): Soul of Sphere Platinum v4.37. Age of Dreams:Abyss of Atlantis v1.5. Lights of Dreams IV: Far Above the Clouds v9.27. Candy World II: Another Golden Bones v9.47. Candy Racing Cup: The Lillians Rallies v3.01. Candy World Adventures IV: The Mirages of Starfield v7.57. Candy to the Rescue IV: The Scepter of Thunders v7.17. Candy in Space III: A Dog to the Space v5.47. Candy's Space Adventures: The Messages from the Lillians v17.47. Candy's Space Mysteries II: New Mission on the earth-likes Planets v7.47. New Xilvan Design Websites. Xilvan Design's Youtube Channel. Friendly, Alexandre L., Xilvan Design.
  4. HI everyone We are looking for a game designer to assist with creating a game. It is a 3D first/third person battle simulator. Its set in the Viking age in Norway and we want to create a brutal but fun game with focus game mechanics. We would like to have a stamina system that is linked to a weapon and armour weight system. This system will require management from the player if they hope to survive. I have a rough GDD but I need a game designer to re write it and make it better. This project is intended to be commerical so if all goes well, you will recieve a share. You will also be doing other game design jobs throught the project. We have a handful of other devs that will be working on this, 3d artists, a programmer and concept. If you are reading this and your not a game designer but want to be involved please message me as we are still looking for other devs and artists but we cant start until the gdd is complete. thank you
  5. Hi there, So i'm an inexperienced student learning games dev at college and im studying c#, in my spare time im trying to work on a text adventure game with a narrative. My issue is that i dont know how to make the decisions, well not simply anyhow. I could write out 50 variables for each decision to read from the player but that would become very tedious and too messy to even comprehend when im adding content. I was thinking of adding functions to hold each decision or area but im at a lack of knowledge on how to jump to a function or if it's even a good solution. I know i could use an array and each decision be a number but that just doesn't seem like a good solution to me either. Any advice would be appreciated and this whole topic might sound dumb to a professional so be understanding please haha. Thanks, Luke
  6. Tanzan

    Feedback on UX

    Hello fellow-developers, I released my first game on google play store for android and i'm just curious what more experienced developers/publishers think of the general user-experience. i.e. should i work on version 2.0. or move on ? Thx in advance to you all! https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.gamlex.android.games.typomania Regards, Tanzan. p.s. To don't let it look like a covered advertising i didn't put the name in the title...
  7. Ed Welch

    Improving Interrupts

    Most squad based games have an interrupt feature that works as follows: During your turn you can arrange it that some of your soldiers don't use up all their action points - leaving enough APs for a "reflex shot" and facing them in the direction of the expected enemy assault. Then during the enemy's turn, if an enemy soldier moves within the range of you soldier it may, or may not trigger an "interrupt". If the interrupt triggers, then the enemy's turn is interrupted and it becomes your turn temporally, you can shoot at the enemy, or do any other action until your APs run out, then the enemy's turn continues. The problem with this is that the interrupt only triggers, based on a random throw of the die (that is for the case of the original X-Com game and Jagged Alliance 2). When you position your soldier for the interrupt, you are putting him in a vulnerable position and if the interrupt doesn't happen (because the random die throw), then your soldier is almost certainly going to get pummelled. For that reason when I was playing X-Com, I almost never tried to get interrupts, because I didn't like the idea of my soldier randomly getting shot to pieces based on a die throw that was completely unpredictable. So, for Merc Tactics I have being working on ways of "solving" this problem. This is how it works: There is no die throw, instead there is a "counter" which starts at number depending on the soldiers interrupt skill. During the enemies turn each time an enemy moves within the soldiers arc of fire the counter goes down by one. When the counter reaches "0" the interrupt is triggered. In the screen shot below, for example, you see an arc of fire drawn on the ground with the number "3". 3 is the number of times that the enemy can move within that arc before the interrupt is triggered. Now the interrupt is triggered: Once the soldier shoots or moves the counter goes back to the original setting, otherwise it holds it's value. So, if the counter didn't hit zero in the first turn, you could keep the soldier where he is and try to get the interrupt in the second turn. This scheme removes the random element and provides feedback to the player, so they always know the likelihood of an interrupt occurring.
  8. Ordnas

    Rocky Knight

    Rocky Knight https://ordnas.itch.io/rocky-knight Rocky Knight is a Beat 'em up prototype game developed by Alessandro "Ordnas" Capriolo. Featuring the beautiful 3D fantasy assets from Synty Studios, and the music scored by Aaron Krogh, Rocky Knight builds upon a classic gameplay with a fresh story and dangerous boss fights inspired by the arcade-style from the 90' like Double Dragon, Knights of the Round and Final Fight. If you liked this game follow me on Twitter: https://twitter.com/CaprioloOrdnas
  9. Brizzler

    Boof Master Reviews

    Hey Everyone, I'm new here and I'm looking to get some feedback on my new game. It's kind of addictive, so I'm thinking about adding some network based features. If you're up for it, please let me know what you think Here is the link: Boof Master For UWP Here's a quick video:
  10. My idea for a moblie strategy game starts out like this.A world in turmoil.Where war is all.The world will be a medieval style.A huge map with lots of citys, towns, forest,hills,mines ,and landmarks,that players and factions can control. The gameplay or battleing handle like this.Each player controls a unit that can freely move around on the map.They can attack enemy faction players.The attacks deals a kill and wound damage.The wound damage can be heal with a freindly healer,while the kill is permant.The thought behind this kill and wound damage is that the battles will be fair,so as each side will suffer lose.While the wound damage will help prolong a good fight.There can also be unit or a camp on the map that will reinforce your units once your out of combat with new troops to replace the kill ones. The objective of the games is too help your factions grow which will consist of thousands of players.Will your doing that you be lvling up your units and commander skills. For the server there will only be one server to keep in a flux of new players.To help new players keep up with the older players ,the freindly faction players can loan there exp troop unit which will be one of many unit types,so they can be on par against other players unit lvl.
  11. This update is huge. Lots added which is why it took over 2 weeks. It’s very epic and I’m extremely proud of myself with this update. I hope you all find it fun!!! Here are the changes Change log Version 1.6 Game Mode Update: 2 New Ways To Play the Game! 2 Brand New Game Modes!! Completely change the way you play the game. Offers much more replay-ability and different ways to enjoy the game. All Game Modes can be permanently unlocked for 100 coins in the Store (Pharmacy). “Roll and Throw” Game-mode Play the original game but using Chemo Balloons as your main weapon. Instead of the Baseball Bat you will have Water Balloons filled with Chemo Medicine. Offers a completely different play style as you can attack from a distance with this “throwing” mechanic. All new animations for character and chemo balloon along with new sounds! Germs and Boss’s have adjusted health in this mode, this is for difficulty balancing. Everything is exactly the same except for the way you attack. “Coin Rush” Game-mode: In this mode you can not attack. The only power up you can use is the “Beanie” the ability to roll. Sarah is in a rush so you are now running and roll faster. There will be no enemies in this mode. There will be a 60 Second time at the start of the game. You will move room to room, all chosen randomly, trying to collect as many coins as you can before the timer reaches 0. Sound Easy? Well it won’t be as you will have to dodge all the room hazards in each room. Spikes, Mucus, Crates, Fireballs, and holes in the floor are all there to stop you. Also the coins disappear if you do not pick them up quick enough. All Coins will be placed randomly and have random timers on them when they disappear. They will give a blinking animation to alert they are going to disappear. Find Timer Pickups that will add seconds to your timer! Can you Top the leaderboards for this game mode? That’s right an all new leaderboard!! Brand New Music Track for this game mode. Music by Luis! You can now play Endless Mode with either weapon!! When you select Endless Mode it will ask you if you want to use the Bat or Chemo Balloon!! New Save Game Reminder Pop Up feature. If you click on Story Mode or Roll and Throw mode and an auto save is found it will alert you to either start new game or load your save game. Starting new game will overwrite the auto save data. New Section In SOSopedia for explanation and description on the New Game Modes! Credits screen updated and Added More Stats to the stats page Text in Store (pharmacy) updated for unlocking all Game Modes. New select cursor when using a controller. It is now animated and in color! Also updated for all added buttons and screens. Made the Coin, full heart, and half a heart pickups slightly larger. Made large hole look more like a hole and allows you to see the edge clearly. Now watch out and don’t fall in! Dryers no longer have a delay before they start shooting fireballs when you enter a room. They will start firing now right away. Fixed a crucial bug that could have prevented the defeat of chapter 2 boss, Chronic. Fixed another crucial bug that could possibly cause the screen to stay white after beating Chronic in Endless mode. Bug Fixes and Optimizations Done! View the full article
  12. Have you played physics puzzles , which are very addictive and you just can't take your mind off that stage you’re stuck on, well here's another of those logic puzzles ; totally free . Bounce N Bang Play Store Trailer: Using cannon, shoot your enemy or bounce cannon-ball through walls guiding it towards their building.Rotate cannon , place moving walls , making the best angle ; just so when you open fire , ball hits the target. Key features:➤ Currently 30 levels (more coming soon)➤ Innovative game play (logical thinking , openfire / shooting cannonball, bounce off borders)➤ Fun animation (especially of explosion)➤ Simple and addictive (solve the puzzle, which gets difficult)Not always that easy, when you openfire , line of shot should hit the end point after limited reflection.How•Use touch or buttons to rotate cannon.• Aiming at enemy directly or bounce off walls guiding it towards them. • Rotate and place moving walls at suitable points ; so when you openfire, BANG ! Cannonball hits the target. Little story if interested : Zormen kingdom has forcefully taken over a village and jailed its inhabitants; few of them have managed to escape prison .They are now trying to get back their occupied land and people. You are a savior who is helping villagers . Provided with cannon you need to destroy enemy's castle. Further story inside game. Screenshots:
  13. Feedback on earlier versions showed that new players often had a hard time beating the bot at first. To fix this, I introduced easier levels of difficulty. These support a gradual progression to more challenging opponents. When playing with a bot, you can now pick a difficulty level before starting the game. To make this as simple as possible, the game automatically recommends a bot based on the results of previous games. After finishing a game, the difficulty level is displayed again to put the result into context. This release also fixes an issue discovered by Hugo in December: The game now displays traces of defeated units for a while, to clarify where those units went, even when you were focused on another part of the map at the time the unit was defeated. The October release of DRTS is now live, you can play the game at https://play.drtsgame.com Many thanks to all the people who helped to test and make this a solid release!
  14. Hello Everyone, I am a one man team looking for the perfect technical collaborator to partner with on the making of an independent story driven game. I have a background in film making and a few years of experience in the industry as freelance Cinematic Artist, and besides my cinematic skills i developed soft skills in modeling, lighting, blocking out levels and staging animations, audio design and narrative writing. I can also script in c# myself, which, along with the soft skills listed above, helps me to quickly prototype new game-play ideas independently. My counterpart must be technical, possibly but not necessarily with an artistic mind too, and can take care of everything that is related to the engineering part of a game, from basic artist friendly features scripting to structure solid, stable and modular code that will support the core of the game. Knowledge of C# and Unity is required and professional experience of 3\5 years in a relevant position is preferred. I dedicate a lot of hours in game development, whether I am working full-time on something else during the day (as Cinematic Artist) or whether I am unemployed. The ideal “partner” then is someone that can put together enough hours during the week and weekends too. I know how to balance life, work and personal work, so I am expecting you to be able and willing to do the same with passion, dedication and sometimes spirit of sacrifice. I am based in Central Europe, so ideally no more than 2 hours difference in our time zone is preferred, for productivity reasons. Should you be a good match with the description above and in case you are interested in knowing more about me, my past projects and the present one and how i am planning to complete it, please get in touch. Cheers
  15. Hey All, So Roll and Throw Game Mode is complete and Coin Rush is almost complete as well. Couple things I’m adding to it. I think I may include 1 more Game Mode before I release this update so most likely looking at another week before release. After that I will concentrate on chapter 3 and conclude the story. Here is a sneak peak at Coin Rush Mode. This is not final product. View the full article
  16. PaulSim

    7 UX Lessons From The Trenches

    This article will be a run-down of several UX / UI-flow lessons we learned by carefully observing a couple of hundred people playtest an early build of our game Steamhounds at live events recently. For context, Steamhounds is a turn-based game, mixing JRPG and tactical/grid-based combat. Players can battle against the AI, but we encouraged them to compete against their friends (sitting side-by-side in front of a pair of monitors) whenever possible. Now, our game’s basic layout and presentation of information were not terrible going into this whole experiment. Experienced gamers and players familiar with the genre generally had no problem getting up to speed without any back-seat driving on our part. But at these live events, there are people who may have never even touched a similar game before, and these players can reveal a lot about the hidden quirks and assumptions in your design. Anyway, without further ado, on to our observations: Problem #1: People Don’t Read Text I think most devs are aware of this one. A surprisingly large proportion of players will skip through any text you put in front of them. We observed that the vast majority (>80%) of players would click straight through the instruction screen we added at the start of the demo, which explains the basic flow of the game: We’re guilty of this too – honestly, who bothers to read the manual when you buy a new gadget? The expectation is that if something is user-friendly, then you can learn how to use it more or less entirely by intuition and experimentation. We anticipated this, but a bigger issue is that once in-game, many players also skipped over our on-screen prompts. This impacted player experience most seriously when they didn’t notice instructions which tell them what they need to do next: The Solution We know that on-screen text is generally the last thing players are inclined to turn to when they are stuck. So, let’s make it impossible to miss: We use movement to draw attention to the prompt as it appears, and then keep it animating until the player follows the instruction. The text was simply too hard to notice before. By forcing the player to pay attention to it, we practically eliminated instances of players asking “so, what do I need to do now?”. We could probably improve this further, by having the animation and positioning of the text draw the player’s attention in the direction of the tiles which they need to click in order to select a position. Problem #2: Interactable Stuff Needs To Be Clear Let’s get the obvious part out of the way: buttons should look like buttons, and it should be clear to the player what choices are available to them at any given moment. In Steamhounds, the player needs to select an action from a menu on their turn (some kind of ability like “ranged attack” or “defensive stance”). When this happens, a menu pops up: This works great – there’s a distinctive sound cue, and an eye-catching spinning animation as the menu expands to fill most of the screen. Nobody has any trouble realising that they need to click one of these buttons. The issue is that after selecting an action, the menu disappears and the player needs to select a position on the battlefield in order to target their ability. We observed that some players would get stuck here, searching around the screen with their mouse, looking for something which could be interacted with: The Solution Although we highlight the clickable tiles, this is somewhat subtle. It’s made worse by the fact that players often look briefly towards their opponent after selecting an action, not noticing the tile highlights appearing. So, here’s our fix: If the player doesn’t hover over a valid tile for a while, we make them flash. This simple change had the intended effect – at the next playtesting event, we rarely had to prompt a playtester to let them know that they needed to click on a tile to continue. We’re once again applying the well-known principle that movement/animation can be used to draw attention. Once the flashing draws them in they inevitably hover the mouse over one of the tiles, and the subsequent highlighting makes their purpose clear. Problem #3: Calls-To-Action Should Be Immediate/Contextual Indies often talk about the idea of a “call to action” when marketing their games – you want people to “sign up for the mailing list!”, “wishlist the game!” or “leave a review on Steam!”. But there are also moments in-game when you want the player to make a choice or perform a particular action. So why not apply some of the same principles, making the next click or decision the player needs to make as clear as possible? Before a battle in Steamhounds starts, players need to set the starting positions and stances (“formation”) for their team. The flow for setting up the formation is not immediately obvious to all players. This is what the screen used to look like: While this tells players everything they need to know in order to set the formation, there are a couple of issues – (a) players don’t read text, and (b) the instructions are presented in a single block, which doesn’t really feel like a clear call to action. Not great. The Solution Since we already implemented fancy attention-grabbing animated text, why not use it to break up this intimidating block of instructions? Now, we guide the player through the process step-by-step, first to “click a character to set their stance”, then to “select stance”, “select position”, and so on. Use contextual prompts which tell players what they need to do right now. This way, they are guided step-by-step through the whole process, and not put off by long sequences of instructions. Problem #4: Terse/Technical Language Needs To Be Used In Moderation As students of game design, we’re all comfortable with the kind of hyper-specific language used to convey game rules. You know – the keyword-laden stuff you find on a Magic the Gathering card or in a board game rulebook – “targets one creature”, “discard 3 cards”, “hits all adjacent characters”. If you’re used to this language, these instructions are perfectly clear and unambiguous. But I’m sure you’ve had experiences playing games with more casual players, who sometimes interpret these rules in ways which your designer-brain tells you were clearly unintended. In Steamhounds, most of this rules-heavy text is found in the tooltips which appear when you’re selecting one of your character’s abilities to execute. Our first instinct was to keep these descriptions as short and direct as possible – after all, we don’t want giant multi-line blocks of text in these tooltips – so we tried to keep them down to one, or at most two, brief sentences: Seems fine, right? But we noticed that this ability was being underutilized by players. The Solution We think the main reason behind the unpopularity of the Focus ability was this: players who didn’t carefully read the rules presented to them previously didn’t have the context needed to understand its significance or benefit. Lots of players will skip through the rules introduction, and hovering over this button will be the first time they encounter anything relating to the “Focus” mechanic. So, we made this change: It’s a bit more wordy, sure. But we noticed an increased rate of people using this ability. The new text both “sells” the ability to the player, and provides additional context so that they can understand its significance, even when viewing this tooltip in isolation. The general principle we’ve learned from this is to describe things in ways which sound cool or attractive and try to make the basic mechanical effects clear without assuming players have internalized information presented elsewhere. Problem #5: People Have Preconceptions About Certain Words We made some interesting observations about how the language we used caused certain players to interpret rules text in unexpected ways. It seems like this is the result of the ingrained associations they have with particular words. What’s the problem here? The word “target” has a connotation of aggression. “Target” is often used in rules text as a neutral term for anything targeted by an ability. Experienced players are very used to this, and understand that the ability pictured above is clearly a buff which you would use on your own characters. But the association between the word “target” and an offensive action was so strong for some players that they would understand this to be an ability which you would use on an enemy, causing the next attack against them to deal additional damage. The Solution It seems like we may need to move away from using such technical language. Here’s our fix: As a designer this is a bit painful – it feels a bit unnecessarily verbose. However, we observed that this new text basically eliminated confusion about how this ability worked, and players stopped trying to target it against their enemies. Devs should consider their desired tone and target audience, and find a balance which works for them. Overly long rules text is surely a problem, but being slightly redundant is an opportunity to reinforce your game’s tone and character. The lesson here: observe playtesters to see if your choice of language has any unexpected implications. Even among English speakers, this can absolutely vary by culture. Problem #6: People Have Associations With Certain Colours This is similar to the previous subject about the connotations of words. Colours are also associated with certain feelings or concepts. We were already attempting to make use of this, by highlighting tiles to show the effects of abilities. Red for aggression, green for support/protection, etc. For the most part, this works fine. But there was one association which we didn’t anticipate, which tripped up a couple of players. They associated red not with aggression, but with something being invalid. So when they hovered over a target to attack them, they were confused because they thought the game was telling them that they couldn’t target that character (in reality, the game just doesn’t show a tile at all if it is not a valid target). The Solution We needed to try and avoid “overlapping”, conflicting associations. The fix: We just shifted the red highlight toward a slightly orange hue. It remains to be seen whether this has really solved the problem (which only affected a couple of players to begin with). But anecdotally, we haven’t had anyone else getting tripped up in the same way. So, once again, double check that your presentation doesn’t interact in an undesirable way with existing associations in the minds of your players. Problem #7: Extra Clicks Are Evil This is one we were absolutely aware of, and had already designed and tweaked the UI flow to remove unnecessary clicks. The problem came with a last-minute addition we made to the build of the game used specifically for live demos. At the end of a battle, a fanfare plays and a big “Victory” or “Defeat” message appears on-screen: Then, the user can click anywhere to exit the battle and return to the main menu. We modified the demo build to display a mailing list signup prompt after the user leaves the battle. This seemed like a great idea – but there was one fatal flaw. The moment the “victory”/”defeat” message appears on-screen is precisely when the players share a good-natured handshake (or start trash-talking each other) and get up from their seats. The battle is over, resolved, and there’s no reason for them to hang around. So, they would leave without ever seeing the mailing list prompt. The Solution Have the game automatically display the newsletter signup screen after a couple of seconds. Honestly, we should have caught this one beforehand – blame it on the last-minute addition of the feature. But the simple change of removing the unnecessary click increased our newsletter signup rate to 3x what it was previously. Ditch those unnecessary clicks! Summary Use movement/animation to draw attention to text prompts Make interactable UI elements clear Think of prompts as calls-to-action. Make them immediate and contextual Be careful about overly technical language, and try to provide context to help players understand the decisions they are making Check for unexpected mental associations of colours, words etc. Smooth out the UI flow by removing unnecessary clicks Hopefully, some of the points outlined here will be directly applicable to your own game somehow. But mostly, we hope that we can convince you of the value of the general approach – observe new players, work out where they are getting stuck or confused, and then extract general principles and try to apply them across the board. We added metric-gathering code into our demo build to record data about battle results, how often each character and ability was selected, and various UI timing information. This was certainly helpful and allowed us to be somewhat scientific in measuring the effects of the changes we made. But probably the majority of the insights here came about the old-fashioned way – watching over players’ shoulders, filling pages with scribbled notes. None of us here are UX experts (and so the unofficial alternate title for this article is “7 UX Screw-Ups We Should Probably Have Avoided”). Like most teams without a dedicated UI/UX person, we try to follow common sense and stay up to date on some simple best practices. But with your head so deeply inside your own project, it’s impossible to view all of the rough edges objectively. The fresh eyes of a new playtester are incredibly valuable – make as much use of them as you can! [Wayback Machine Archive]
  17. Hi, my name is Olivier Girardot, I am a music composer and a sound designer. Here is a sound atmosphere I made for a video game project: a Medieval City Atmosphere by Night: You can find this sound and loads more at: http://www.ogsoundfx.com
  18. Hey All, Update is coming along nicely. This is going to be a huge update, I know I say that every update but this truly is epic. Will have the whole change log next update but wanted to share a nice gameplay clip of “Roll and Throw” as well as showing off the new game save found confirmation box. I’m working on “Coin Rush” mode right now. View the full article
  19. Hey All, Just wanted to share a juicy update of what I am currently working on. 1 of the new game modes for 1.6 is called “Roll and Throw”. In this game mode you play the game with Chemo Balloons as your weapon in place of the Bat. Still a WIP but wanted to show you what it will be like. I’m very excited and this will change how you play. Let me know your thoughts. View the full article
  20. Check out my last video where I show you how I create some scary background atmospheres !
  21. There are two Entities in the game and we controlling one of them. The other entity moves in a particular direction throughout the game and I want to make the AI like the enemy shoots at my player after some duration of time. I am using Directx 10 SDK for this. I think I would need to calculate the distance between the two entities and shoot it towards the player. I would need to calculate the distance between the two vectors and direction of A towards B. How to calculate the direction between the two?
  22. I finally got a chance to play Twilight Imperium 4th edition so I figured I'd do a write up. We had 5 players and it was a blast. For race selection, we used this website about a week before the game http://www.mygurps.com/TwilightImperium.html and selected 3 choices per player. Here's what it rolled up for us (underlined is what we chose): Yellow (Eck (me) ) may choose from The Clan of Saar, The Naalu Collective, or The Nekro Virus. Green (Devin) may choose from The Barony of Letnev, The Mentak Coalition, or The Winnu. Blue (Matt) may choose from The Federation of Sol, The Yssaril Tribes, or The Xxcha Kingdom. Black (Eric) may choose from The Ghosts of Creuss, The L1Z1X Mindnet, or Sardakk N'orr. Blue (Alex) may choose from The Yin Brotherhood, The Emirates of Hacan, or The Embers of Muaat. To save time, I setup the map before hand since I was hosting. I went with a 5-player symmetrical design and tried to balance out tech specialties, resources, influence, and planet types. Here's what I came up with. See the future pictures for how that red section gets essentially "cut-out" for a 5 player game. Map setup With a mostly balanced map, we rolled to see who would get first pick of starting locations. And the last person to choose was awarded the Speaker token. One other house rule we played with was the Speaker would get to pick the 6th Strategy Card. The secondary ability on the 6th card would get triggered after the Speaker activated his Strategy Card. Round 1 start And then we started playing. It was a pretty standard set of early turns where people moved out and claimed a few systems. The only thing of special note was the Mentak (Green) chose Warfare but instead of claiming more of his central pie slice, he instead claimed the contested planet between him and the Hacaan (Purple). This led to immediate border friction and posturing between the two races. Green was there first, but Purple felt pinned in behind the Gravity Rift (black hole). I feel like the Naalu (yellow) are late bloomers so I was quick to make friends with my more combat focused neighbors. Here's what we looked like after Round 1. Round 1 complete I made a deal with the L1z1x (black) player to allow me to claim the green tech specialty planet and move out of the system so he could have the bigger resource value world. The green tech specialty would allow me to get my racial tech Neuroglaive faster and make it so I could hold my own versus all those dreadnaughts. We also exchanged Ceasefires. I couldn't quite take Mecatol this round so I moved adjacent to claim that victory point and set me up for next turn. I made sure to get Sol's (blue's) permission before taking that world and gave him our border planet to solidify the peace. I also traded my racial promissory note to the Mentak which allowed him to move first in the next round. Giving him a slight edge with the coming conflict of the Hacaan's (purple's) fleets. And I bought a sabotage card from the Hacaan which helped fund the war efforts. Publicly trading for a sabotage was great since it made people less likely to play action cards against me. Round 2 Complete Round 3 was very tense. L1z1x (black) chose Imperial, but his dreads could only move 1 (at the start). I delayed my move as long as I could so he was low on tactical counters. Then when he upgraded his dreads, I activated Mecatol Rex. At this point he stated multiple times that if I did that, he would roll through my territory. But this was the same turn I got Neurogalives. I told him I was no longer afraid of his fleets, Mecatol Rex was mine, but I would not strike first. He was still low on counters so he couldn't really do anything but stew this turn. While this was going on, the Hacaan (purple) got pinned in by Mentak (green) and Sol (blue). The space cats started massing a big fleet and told the Mentak (green) player he was coming for him. Blue claimed a few more planets and a couple of points. Round 3 complete L1z1x (black) started an arms race with my peaceful Naalu (yellow), threatening me the entire time. Not much was exchanged besides words however. Black was still token starved so he couldn't attack me without crippling his own position thanks to Neurogalive. Big things were happening on the other side of the board. The Hacaan (purple) used an action card to connect Alpha and Beta wormholes to threaten the Mentak's (green's) homeworld. In response, the Mentak moved their speed 3 cruiser fleets through the Beta wormhole and took the Hacaan's homeworld. My daughter was wandering in and out of the game all day. She was in the room around this time. After the game she asked me if green attacked purple with his cruisers because she saw he could sneak through... #ParentingWin Blue started moving his fleets towards Mecatol but I made some sweet deals just to get his ceasefire. Round 4 complete The Mentak (green) counter attacked the Hacan (purple), but the space cats played skilled retreat. Then they retook their homeworld. The Federation of Sol (blue) started moving towards Hacan (purple). L1z1x (black) built up a ton of PDS and upgraded them meaning I couldn't go crazy in his backyard. The glorious Naalu (yellow/me) made a series of plays over this round to gain 5 points. Imperial - held mecatol +1 Imperial - (Public Objective) Held 6 non-home system planets +1 Secret (Action phase) - Win a space combat versus a player with the most points +1 Secret (Status Phase) - Own two faction technologies +1 Public (Status Phase) - Own two unit upgrade technologies +1 So I went from 3 points to 8 points in one round. I still had the Speaker token so I'd get first choice of strategy card, and as the Naalu I would get to act first no matter which Strategy Card I chose. Nobody could take Mecatol from me this round since I had waited so late in the turn to make my move this turn. I knew there were action cards or agendas that might be able to mess me up, but the only thing that popped up was Seeds of an Empire. Voting on that either the first player would gain a point, or the last player would gain a point. I was scared for a moment because I thought first player might lose a point. Round 5 complete We didn't bother playing out any of round 6 because I was going to choose imperial, score a point for Mecatol, and score a point for one of the objectives that they couldn't take from me. Victory Naalu (yellow/me)! Final score: The Naluu Collective - 10 The L1z1x Mindnet - 6 The Mentak Coalition - 6 The Federation of Sol - 4 The Emirates of Hacan - 3 Final Thoughts: Fourth edition is much more streamlined than 3rd. The 5 player game took 8 hours including a break in the middle for pizza. Being the Naalu and going from 3 to 8 in one turn and then winning the first action of the next turn was really impressive, but it also felt a little bit unfair. Hanging out at 3 points, people didn't feel I was a big threat so they never felt the need to stop dealing with me diplomatically. But I was also on Mecatol Rex for the entire game and nobody attacked me there once. So I don't feel too bad about winning. I liked our 6th card house rule, and I also liked the 5 player wedge cut out. Most of the others didn't like it however, because they felt like it took away too many planets. I don't think they realize that with a 6th player we'd have someone else occupying space AND we'd also have to deal with 5 blank tiles so there would be EVEN FEWER worlds. I know people had fun though because they're already asking me when I'm hosting another round. Maybe we'll play the 14 point game soon. Next Game: https://www.gamedev.net/blogs/entry/2265456-twilight-imperium-4th-edition-game-2/
  23. Setup Game 2 was supposed to be a 6-player game, choose whatever race you wanted, balanced map. That dropped to a 5-player game when one of the players couldn't make it. Then a 5th player bailed last minute and his phone didn't send the message. It's worth noting that he felt terrible about this and apologized multiple times. So instead of having the map setup and ready to rock and roll right at game time. We started 30 minutes late and had to build the map the old fashioned way. I think it's a testament to the streamlined improvements that we were still able to finish in a reasonable 8.5 hours (including pizza phase). Here's what happened... Race selection method - choose whatever you want. Speaker - roll randomly and Sardakk N'orr got it. Devin - Mentak (green) - Playing Mentak again. Damn pirates Dalton - Federation of Sol (blue) - New player - came super prepared and even had notes for early strategies after listening to Space Cats and Peace Turtles. Javi - Letnev (purple) - New player Eck - Sardakk N'orr (black/me) - I won the last game, so for this game I was going to go for more role-playish fun. I planned to go combat focused and support others who did the same. The 5th player - no show was supposed to play Embers of Muat. I was hoping to trade the War Sun tech with him, and I'd have payed silly prices to make that happen. Ah well... Some other time! Instead we randomly built the map, and I didn't take a clean pic of it because I was focused on analyzing the new board. Sorry about that! One thing to keep in mind for a 4-player game is every strategy card gets picked so every secondary action is possible on your turn. This is super useful for counting on secondaries as part of your grand plans. I only mention this cause I took too long to write up this after action report, so I don't recall all my strategy card picks. Round 1 - I told the table my idea of me wanting to take the game a little less seriously. I'd still try to win but my goal was to be a warlike bug race. Everyone else was welcome (and encouraged) to play their best. They were game so the first proclamation I made was - whoever wins the first combat, gets my support for the throne! The table snickered and agreed. Other than that, it was a pretty standard early turn, Sardaak N'orr (black/me) got Warfare and expanded towards Letnev (purple) for some early trading partners. Everyone else expanded a bit. 0 - Mentak (green/Devin) 0 - Federation of Sol (blue/Dalton) 1 - Letnev (purple/Javi) 0 - Sardakk N'orr (black/Eck/me) Round 1 end Round 2 - Federation of Sol (blue) was poised to take Mecatol this turn and chose Imperial. The rest of the table agreed this was a bad idea (once Sol gets on Mecatol, it's hell to kick him off) so Mentak (green) blocked him with a couple of cruisers. Blue took our shared border planet without even talking about it. Though I respected the move as a combat-focused-space-bug, I planned my counter strike for this transgression. 1 - Mentak (green/Devin) 0 - Federation of Sol (blue/Dalton) 2 - Letnev (purple/Javi) 0 - Sardakk N'orr (black/Eck/me) Round 2 end Someone offered me a stick of gum... It made me laugh pretty hard. Round 3 - This was an exciting turn. Lots of combat so the space-bugs were pleased! The Federation (blue) kicked those pesky Mentak (green) pirates off of Mecatol. A bug of my word, I gave him my support for the throne. Letnev (purple) lost two ground forces trying to take a border world I said he could have. Blue had blocked the only access into his undefended world... That is, it was the only way if you were unwilling to risk the Gravity Rift... Sardakk N'orr (black/me) hurled a carrier past the gravity rift successfully to take the Federation's (blue's) richest world. For those that are unfamiliar with the rule, every ship you send out of or through a Gravity Rift gets a +1 to their speed. However on a 1d10 roll of 1-3, the ship is destroyed. It could have been the Federation's undefended homeworld, but Blue was a new player and I didn't want to be THAT mean. 3 - Mentak (green/Devin) 4 - Federation of Sol (blue/Dalton) 2 - Letnev (purple/Javi) 1 - Sardakk N'orr (black/Eck/me) Gravity Rift Snipe Round 3 end Round 4 - I forgot to take a picture cause so much stuff was going on. And it's been too long to remember ALL the details. Sardakk N'orr (black/me) managed to kick the Federation (blue) off of Mecatol through a combination of action cards, bombardment, and a ton of ground forces. I got back, gave up, and got back my Support for the Throne. I think it wound up in Mentak's (green's) hands. This time I think it was for destroying someone's Dreadnaught? Sardakk N'orr (black/me) had a massive fleet on and around Mecatol Rex when the agenda Ixthian Artifact came up. I had lots of influence but definitely not enough to win the vote. I put down 19 against, other people put 24 for. Then I played the action card to get +5 votes. Since I was the speaker, I broke ties... We rolled the die anyway as a what-if and it came up 5. WHEW! Mentak (green) snagged a poorly defended Federation (blue) world and blew up a space dock. And people also started building up their fleets.<score guess> 6 - Mentak (green/Devin) 5 - Federation of Sol (blue/Dalton) 4 - Letnev (purple/Javi) 3 - Sardakk N'orr (black/Eck/me) <pic missing> Round 5 - Lots of fleet massing! Sardakk N'orr (black/me) had nearly ALL their plastic out on the board at one point. More massive battles, Mentak (green) jumped ahead to 8 during the round, but I used the Silence of Space action card to sneak through the overly defended wormhole and snipe his homeworld. Now Mentak(green) was in a weird position. To get his homeworld back he'd have to attack me, which would lose his support for the throne... 8- Mentak (green/Devin) 6 - Federation of Sol (blue/Dalton) 6 - Letnev (purple/Javi) 5 - Sardakk N'orr (black/Eck/me) Round 5 end Round 6 - Sadakk N'orr (black/me) wound up playing Diplomacy on Mentak(green's) home system, meaning he couldn't take it back this round. He still scored a secret objective though which brought him up to 9. People tried desperately to kick Sardakk N'orr (black/me) off of Mecatol, but just couldn't do it. There was too much plastic on the board. 9 - Mentak (green/Devin) 7 - Federation of Sol (blue/Dalton) 6 - Letnev (purple/Javi) 7 - Sardakk N'orr (black/Eck/me) Round 6 end Round 7 - With a point for mecatol, and a 2 point tech objective, Sardaak N'orr(black/me) was able to clinch the victory. Had I been unable to score mid-turn, Mentak (green) would have won without owning his home system by scoring his last secret objective. The picture of the board was pretty much the same, since my first action ended the game. Final score 9 - Mentak (green/Devin) 7 - Federation of Sol (blue/Dalton) 7 - Letnev (purple/Javi) 10 - Sardakk N'orr (black/Eck/me) VICTORY!!! Final thoughts This was a long and crazy ride. I think I wound up giving my support for the throne away about 4 times? I really shouldn't have won this game, but the second half of the game lined up perfectly as far as agendas and objectives were concerned. Other people just couldn't score those big 2 point objectives and I barely managed to eek out a victory. I am now 2 for 2 in my Twilight Imperium 4th games! Wish me luck for the next game. Other Notes Here was our cool 5 player map setup. This took quite a while to balance and even though we didn't actually use it, I thought others might be interested in a balanced Twilight Imperium 5 player map. The red hexes are impassible, and the 2 trade goods were a suggestion online. I'm not sure the trade goods are necessary though. Special thanks to my daughter for helping me tweak the board. Prev Game: https://www.gamedev.net/blogs/entry/2265302-twilight-imperium-4th-edition-game-1/ Next Game: Haven't played yet...
  24. I'm working on a small arcade-style Android game for phones and tablets( using Android Studio and Java ) and I'm not 100% satisfied with the touch screen controls. The game has five buttons for control; left and right, and three buttons for firing three different bullet types( essential to the main mechanic of the game itself ). The irony is that they respond very well even with scaling on different devices and the coding is bullet-proof( zero crashes or bugs since extensive testing ), but as the game is as fast paced as Space Invaders or Columns it kinda falls apart as I switch between pressing buttons in the heat of the action. I am now at the point where I'm having to slow the game down to make it easier to cope with the touch-screen buttons, or adopt a harsh attitude that the player will need an Android-compatible gamepad for the best possible experience... Quality controls with standard input is something I take very seriously, but in this case I feel action games are not suited for tablets without a gamepad. Would this be a correct assumption or could I do better? Any thoughts would be most welcome - even if you are just a gamer. Cheers.
  25. Important: I am trying to realize in scrtach which is performance very low due to it's "virutal level" scrtach->flashplayer->java... Also i'm new to this forum so i'm sorry if I missed group (like last time) Like a title is saying:I have project ,and I get negative feedback on it because some people need 30 min to complete it (what is the planned time)but problem is that some people need EVEN 5 hours…(game is incremental/idle/upgrade type so it's important to keep same time ...)———————————————————————————————————————-Of course people with slower computer will have less fps so game will be slower for them,so I have created TimeDelta system for each frame to calculate something to do per second for example Update(){move(TimeDelta*speed)} so that mean it will be moving speed number of pixels(or units) per second so it will be same for almost each user.But problem is next:I have to change ySpeed by jumpPower (#PlayerJump in my project)when any jump button is pressed then in each frame decrease ySpeed by gravity it is(-10 * TimeDelta)but when someone have lower fps it will have higher TimeDelta and will fall faster but with same jump it turns out to jump significantly lower that changes core of game BUT even worse if fps suddenly in moment of jump then timeDelta would be 1 so player will jump much much MUCH higher , then fall much slower because timeDelta changed in meanwhile…(and the point of my game is about upgrading jump not complete game in first fps drop) —————————————————————————————————————————————————————Then I got an idea to fix TimeDelta (like in unity for rigibody) so it will be rounded likeif calculated TimeDelta is 0.01834 it will be 0.02 fixedif weaker computer is using it the TImeDelta will be 0.143 so runded to 0.14 and so on…I did not manage to realize it… i tried to calculate it before main initialization of game objectsbut I'm afraid to fps will drop in moment that is calculating so it will be much diffirent…I was trying with empty loop(400)(in scrtach even this is taking time) to calculate it but i'm not sure is it right So is there good way to realize this fixed TimeDelta I only have timer function to use and time difference between frames This_is_the_link_for_the_game
  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

We are the game development community.

Whether you are an indie, hobbyist, AAA developer, or just trying to learn, GameDev.net is the place for you to learn, share, and connect with the games industry. Learn more About Us or sign up!

Sign me up!