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Found 42 results

  1. Hello everyone, I appreciate any help i can get. So i recently started getting this message listed bellow in visual studio when i would compile any game i have for UE4.23.0. 1>EXEC : [1/28] error : Unable to create child process I have no idea how to fix this, and also i really don't want to have to set all the classes again in a new project. Second thing is that i can not move my Character on the Sever when testing multiplayer after adding "Role = ROLE_Authority" to sections in an AI Tracker bot class that i created as a part of Tom Loomans Course on Udemy. I am not following Tom Loomans course 100%, Do i need to add sever implementation to my character because i am using different movement code then what Tom uses? I Am happy to share some screen shots if needed. Please help, thankyou for your time.
  2. intenscia

    PC Cross Platform Mod API & SDK

    mod.io is an cross platform mod service created by the team behind ModDB.com and IndieDB.com. It can be integrated in-game using the REST API, C/C++ SDK or engine plugins (if available) Unity and Unreal Engine are ready to use with other engine plugins in development. Features include: Platform agnostic (support 1 click mod installs on Steam, Epic Games Store, Discord, GOG, itch.io and even consoles in the future) Clientless (mod.io has no other dependencies and works behind the scenes in your game) Embeddable web app UI, so you can integrate your mod community anywhere Powerful search, filtering and tagging of mods Moderation and reporting systems built-in Steps to getting mod.io integrated: Add your game to our test environment or production Read our API documentation for an overview of how mod.io works Choose an Engine Plugin, API or SDK to integrate mod.io into your game and mod making tools Ready to launch? Add your game to our production environment then let's discuss promoting your release Need help? Our team is available on Discord to assist and our getting started guide has more information for you Benefits of using mod.io: mod.io offers the same core functionality as Steamworks Workshop (1 click mod installs in-game), plus mod hosting, moderation and all of the critical pieces needed. Where we differ is our approach to modding and the flexibility a REST API offers. For example: Our API is not dependent on a client or SDK, allowing you to run mod.io in many places such as your homepage and launchers Designing a good mod browsing UI is hard, our plugins ship with a UI built in to save you a lot of effort and help your mods stand out We don’t apply rules globally, so if you want to enable patronage, sales or other experimental features, reach out to discuss Our platform is built by the super experienced ModDB.com team and is continually improving for your benefit Your community can consume the mod.io API to build modding fan sites or discord bots if they want Large studios and publishers: A private white label option is available to license, if you want a fully featured mod-platform that you can control and host in-house. Contact us to discuss. Find out more: Visit mod.io | About us | Add your game | Chat on Discord These screenshots are from our Unity plugin:
  3. Hello everyone! I've decided to implement a destructible enemies system. Description: When bullet hit enemy in specific part of his body(arm fo example) armour, which covers that part of body, will fall off. Enemies in my game are robots so this means that when shooting them certain plates of their armour will fall off. All enemies will have a different amount of armour plates My solution: The only solution I came up with is to make an actor with a static mesh and attach it to the bones of enemy's skeletal mesh. When bullet hit that actor it detaches and fly away with add impulse node. Question: Maybe there is a better solution, which I'm missing and it's more efficient.
  4. Using Unreal 4.22 (C++) I'd like to be able to chuck all the vertices of a mesh into an array to work with. I'm interested in these different levels of complexity: a static mesh a mesh that is changing with simple T/R/S transformations a mesh that is deforming with animation (not necessarily with bones) Does anyone know what I should be looking into for these? Any answers to any of those 3 appreciated.
  5. khawk

    Epic Releases Unreal Engine 4.23

    Epic Games today released Unreal Engine 4.23, with new features and enhancements so that artists can continue to push the boundaries of cinematic quality and realism for real-time experiences. This latest update includes next-generation virtual production tools to achieve final pixel quality in real-time, developer-focused tools to maximize performance, and massive-scale physics and destruction effects at cinematic quality. Key features and enhancements now shipping in Unreal Engine 4.23 include: Next-generation virtual production tools: Now filmmakers can achieve final shots live on set. With LED walls powered by nDisplay, filmmakers can bring real-world actors and props into a photoreal Unreal Engine environment background, capturing interactive and accurate lighting and reflections in-camera. Filmmakers can also switch to a digital green screen for real-time compositing in UE4. Additional virtual production capabilities include the ability to interactively and collaboratively explore digital UE4 environments with new VR scouting tools, leverage enhanced Live Link tools for real-time data streaming, and remotely control UE4 from an iPad or other device for increased on-set flexibility. Enhanced real-time ray tracing (beta): First introduced in UE 4.22, ray tracing has received numerous enhancements to improve stability and performance, and to support additional material and geometry types including landscape geometry, instanced static meshes, procedural meshes, and Niagara sprite particles. These improvements deliver a better out-of-the-box experience and end results for users. Chaos physics and destruction (beta): With Chaos, artists can fracture, shatter, and demolish massive-scale scenes at cinematic quality with unprecedented levels of artistic control. Simulate in real time, or pre-cache larger sims for real-time playback. Chaos is also integrated with the Niagara VFX system to trigger the generation of secondary effects such as dust and smoke. Virtual texturing (beta): Unreal Engine 4.23 introduces both Streaming and Runtime Virtual Texturing, where large textures are tiled and only the visible tiles loaded, thereby reducing texture memory overhead for light maps and detailed artist-created textures, and improving rendering performance for procedural or layered materials respectively. Unreal Insights (beta): The new Unreal Insights system collects, analyzes, and visualizes data on UE4 behavior for profiling, helping users understand engine performance from either live or pre-recorded sessions. As well as tracking various default sub-systems and events, users can also add their own code annotations to generate trace events. HoloLens 2 support: Support for the Microsoft HoloLens 2, initially released in beta in May, is now production-ready. Features include streaming and native deployment, emulator support, finger tracking, gesture recognition, meshing, voice input, spatial anchor pinning, and more. For a full feature list and additional information, please visit: https://www.unrealengine.com/blog/unreal-engine-4-23-released
  6. Repulse

    1YEFKX.jpg

    From the album: Iragon

  7. Meet the Vive 3DSP SDK " HTC VIVE 3DSP is an audio SDK which provide applications with spatial audio, a key factor for an immersive VR experience. With the HTC VIVE 3DSP SDK, the spatial perception is simulated by specific functions and features, such as head-related transfer functions recording and improvement, higher-order ambisonic simulation of sound direction, room audio simulation, adding background noise floor, real-world acoustic property of distance, geometric and raycast occlusion, Hi-Res audio support, and many other features. " It also has youtube demo video inside the link, please try.
  8. Doyu

    UI Design Widget Kit for UE4

    Simple UI Design Widget is user interface set for your UE4 projects and created entirely with Blueprint classes. Simple UI Design UMG contains various user Interface styles which consist of common popup, scroll, text input, slide, radio button, drop down box, toggle button, check box. Features: - It is created entirely with Blueprint classes - Full mouse and keyboard key binding - Common popup, scroll, text input, slide, radio button, drop down box, toggle button, check box style UI - Accept, default and cancel button function - Responsive UI design - UI sound effects ( common popup, warning popup, success popup and click ) - More than 40 high resolution images Quick Preview: Marketplace Page : https://www.unrealengine.com/marketplace/simple-ui-design-widget-umg
  9. Brain

    Hydraulic press screen demo

    From the album: Mr Boom's Firework Factory

    A demo of the animated screen image

    © (C) Craig Edwards, Brainbox.cc 2019

  10. Brain

    Hydraulic press animated display screen

    From the album: Mr Boom's Firework Factory

    The SQUASH-O-MATIC 2000 ready to break stuff...

    © (C) Craig Edwards, Brainbox.cc 2019

  11. Brain

    Level 11 gameplay screenshot

    From the album: Mr Boom's Firework Factory

    Playing through level 11, with shipping containers by @rutin

    © (C) Craig Edwards, Brainbox.cc 2019

  12. Brain

    Level 3 starburst explosion

    From the album: Mr Boom's Firework Factory

    Yup, it seems that the collision on the barriers works just fine...

    © (C) Craig Edwards, Brainbox.cc 2019

  13. Brain

    A very hazardous work environment

    From the album: Mr Boom's Firework Factory

    Someone should call health and safety and let them know about the many violations caused by this bot.

    © (C) Craig Edwards 2019

  14. This whitepaper was originally posted on the Unreal Engine Blog bySebastien Miglio at https://unrealengine.com/en-US/blog/create-photoreal-car-windows-in-unreal-engine. The original whitepaper by Min Jie Wu and edited by Robb Surridge is available for download at here. Republished with permission. Automotive glass can be a particularly challenging element for real-time automotive rendering. In the real world, car windows involve a complex interplay of light as it passes through multiple layers of material with different physical properties. These results can be difficult to imitate in a real-time renderer, while achieving an acceptable balance between physical realism and a fast enough frame rate. And to make things even more difficult, the windows of a car naturally attract the viewer’s attention — especially the windshield. Any unrealistic artifacts or reflections can easily destroy the overall effect of an otherwise high-quality rendering. This paper describes an approach to designing windshields in Unreal Engine 4 that delivers photoreal results in real time. See the results of this technique in the award-winning short film, The Human Race: Mesh Structure This technique begins with the way the windshield is modeled. The windshield needs to be made up of four independent meshes or mesh groups. Each of these four meshes needs to be single-sided. The following diagram summarizes the layout of the meshes: Figure 1: Mesh layout There are two outer layers of the windshield, Mesh 1 and Mesh 2, that have their normals pointing outward toward the exterior of the vehicle. These are represented by the red and yellow lines. There are two inner layers, Mesh 3 and Mesh 4, that have their normals pointing inward toward the inside of the vehicle. These are represented by the green and blue lines. This detail view shows how these four meshes are arranged with respect to each other in 3D space: Figure 2: Mesh arrangement in 3D space Mesh 1, the exterior reflective layer, forms the outer skin of the windshield. It will provide the reflections that you see from outside the vehicle. Its normals point outward from the vehicle. Figure 3: Mesh highlighted in orange At a distance of half the windshield’s total thickness, you have Mesh 2, the outer tint layer. When you look at the windshield from the outside, this layer tints your view of the inside of the car according to the color of the glass. Its normals also point outward, in the same direction as Mesh 1. Figure 4: Mesh 2 highlighted in orange Figure 5: Mesh 3 highlighted in orange Back to back with Mesh 2, you have Mesh 3, the inner tint layer. When you look out through the windshield from inside the car, this layer tints your view of the outside surroundings according to the color of the glass. Its normals point inward. Figure 6: Mesh 4 highlighted in orange Finally, at the innermost extent of the windshield, Mesh 4 provides the reflections of the interior of the car that you see when looking out from the inside. Its normals point inward. The following image shows the Static Mesh Actors for these four meshes in the World Outliner in the Unreal Editor: Figure 8: Static Mesh Actors in the World Outliner Below, all four layers are shown in the viewport of the Unreal Editor, in wireframe and lit modes: Figure 9: Four layers in the viewport Material Design This technique requires two different translucent Materials: A reflective Material, which you’ll apply to the exterior and interior surfaces of the windshield. A tint Material, whose only job is to color the things that you see through the glass. Material 1: Reflective The goal of this Material is to handle only the light that gets reflected off the glass. We want this layer of the windshield to be fully transparent when we look at it straight on, but very reflective when we look at it at a grazing angle. To model this in Unreal Engine, we need to start with a translucent Material. When you select your Material’s output node in the Material Editor, set the following values in the Details panel: Set the Blend Mode to Translucent. Set the Lighting Mode to Surface TransparencyVolume. Enable Screen Space Reflections. Figure 10: Details panel in the Material Editor for the reflective Material In the Material’s graph, we set it up as a mirrorlike chrome, but we also tie its opacity to the camera’s viewing angle using the Fresnel node. Make the Base Color white. Set the Metallic and Specular inputs to 1.0. Set the Roughness input to 0.0. Ordinarily, a white, perfectly reflective, and perfectly metallic surface would have the appearance of smooth chrome. However, we also attach the Fresnel node to the Opacity input of the material’s output node. This makes those crisp reflections appear only where the curvature of the glass causes us to see it at a sharp enough angle for the Fresnel function to begin affecting the opacity. Anywhere the viewing angle is close to the normal of the mesh, the glass remains clear. Figure 10: Materials graph Car windshields typically use an athermic glass, which has slightly more reflectance than plain glass. The following image illustrates how the reflectivity of the athermic material changes over different wavelengths of incoming light: Figure 11: Material graph for the reflective Material To simulate this physical property, and make your reflections fit your scene more accurately, you can adjust the values of the Exponent and BaseReflectFraction inputs that you pass to the Fresnel node (called EXP and Intensity respectively in the Material shown above). This gives you control over the strength of the reflections and how they fade over the curvature of the glass. Figure 12: Effect of passing different input values to the Fresnel node Material 2: Tint The goal of this Material is to handle only the light that passes through the glass. We want this layer of the windshield to ignore reflections completely, but to color light that passes through the glass according to the tint of the windshield. To model this in Unreal Engine, we need another translucent Material. When you select your Material’s output node in the Material Editor, set the following values in the Details panel: Set the Blend Mode to Translucent. Set the Lighting Mode to Surface TransparencyVolume. This time, disable Screen Space Reflections. For this Material, we want to avoid all specular and reflective contributions. A simple way to set up the graph for this Material is to use a constant Opacity setting. Make the Base Color the color of the glass. Always use a Specular input of 0.0. This allows light to pass evenly through the glass. Use a Roughness input of 1.0. Use the Opacity channel to control how dark the glass is — that is, how much of the interior of the vehicle you can see from the outside. You can vary this value freely to make the tint effect as strong as you need it to be. Figure 13: Details panel in the Material editor for the tint Material Figure 14: Material graph for the tint Material A slightly more sophisticated setup is to vary the opacity of the glass based on the viewing angle of the camera, as we did in the reflective Material above. In the reflective Material, increasing opacity adds to the strength of the reflections. However, in the tint Material, increasing the opacity simulates the greater absorption of light as it passes through the glass at a sharper angle. The effect is that as your viewing angle increases, less light comes through the glass, and the objects on the other side become harder to see. Figure 15: Material graph for the tint Material, with optional absorption setup You can control the strength of the effect by raising or lowering the value of the absorption parameter shown above. However, this effect works best when you keep it very subtle. If you choose to use absorption, we recommend keeping the value below 0.1. Mesh and Material Assignments Now that you have your Static Mesh Actors and your two Materials ready, you need to assign the correct Materials to the correct Actors: Mesh 1, the exterior reflective layer: Assign the Reflective Material. Mesh 2, the outer tint layer: Assign the Tint Material. Mesh 3, the inner tint layer: Assign the Tint Material. Mesh 4: the interior reflective layer: Assign the Reflective Material. Sorting Translucency The final step in using this technique is to set up the translucency sort priority for the four Static Mesh Actors. When Unreal Engine needs to render multiple translucent objects that overlap in the camera view, it has to draw the objects in back before the objects in front. To figure out the drawing order, it compares the distance from the camera to the origin point of each object’s bounding box. Although this works most of the time, this strategy is not perfect; it can occasionally result in the rear object being drawn in front. To avoid that possibility, we can give the Engine a hint by setting the Translucency Sort Priority option for each of the four Static Mesh Actors in the Level. To find this option, select the Static Mesh Actor for each part of the windshield in either the Viewport or the World Outliner, scroll down in the Details panel to the Rendering section, and expand the advanced properties. Set the Actors to use the following values: Mesh 1: 1 Mesh 2: 0 Mesh 3: 0 Mesh 4: 1 With these settings, the Engine always chooses to render the inner layers of the windshield behind their corresponding outer layers. This retains the correct order for windshield rendering even if the camera flies into or out of the car. Conclusion With four Static Mesh Actors and two Materials set up as described above, you can achieve high-quality, realistic, and performant glass for any automotive rendering project in Unreal. Learn more about Unreal Engine at https://unrealengine.com. [Wayback machine archive]