• Advertisement

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'VR'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Categories

  • Audio
    • Music and Sound FX
  • Business
    • Business and Law
    • Career Development
    • Production and Management
  • Game Design
    • Game Design and Theory
    • Writing for Games
    • UX for Games
  • Industry
    • Interviews
    • Event Coverage
  • Programming
    • Artificial Intelligence
    • General and Gameplay Programming
    • Graphics and GPU Programming
    • Engines and Middleware
    • Math and Physics
    • Networking and Multiplayer
  • Visual Arts
  • Archive

Categories

  • News

Categories

  • Audio
  • Visual Arts
  • Programming
  • Writing

Categories

  • GameDev Unboxed

Categories

  • Game Dev Loadout

Categories

  • Game Developers Conference
    • GDC 2017
    • GDC 2018
  • Power-Up Digital Games Conference
    • PDGC I: Words of Wisdom
    • PDGC II: The Devs Strike Back
    • PDGC III: Syntax Error

Forums

  • Audio
    • Music and Sound FX
  • Business
    • Games Career Development
    • Production and Management
    • Games Business and Law
  • Game Design
    • Game Design and Theory
    • Writing for Games
  • Programming
    • Artificial Intelligence
    • Engines and Middleware
    • General and Gameplay Programming
    • Graphics and GPU Programming
    • Math and Physics
    • Networking and Multiplayer
  • Visual Arts
    • 2D and 3D Art
    • Critique and Feedback
  • Topical
    • Virtual and Augmented Reality
    • News
  • Community
    • For Beginners
    • GameDev Challenges
    • GDNet+ Member Forum
    • GDNet Lounge
    • GDNet Comments, Suggestions, and Ideas
    • Coding Horrors
    • Your Announcements
    • Hobby Project Classifieds
    • Indie Showcase
    • Article Writing
  • Affiliates
    • NeHe Productions
    • AngelCode
  • Workshops
    • C# Workshop
    • CPP Workshop
    • Freehand Drawing Workshop
    • Hands-On Interactive Game Development
    • SICP Workshop
    • XNA 4.0 Workshop
  • Archive
    • Topical
    • Affiliates
    • Contests
    • Technical
  • GameDev Challenges's Topics

Calendars

  • Community Calendar
  • Games Industry Events
  • Game Jams
  • GameDev Challenges's Schedule

Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.

Developers

Developers


Group


About Me


Website


Industry Role


Twitter


Github


Twitch


Steam

Found 104 results

  1. VIVE SRWorks SDK

    Last week VIVE announced the VIVE SRWorks SDK, allowing developers to access the stereo front facing cameras on the VIVE Pro. Developers will now be able to perform 3D perception and depth sensing with the stereo RGB sensors. From the announcement: The SDK includes plugins for Unity and Unreal. VIVE also included a few videos worth checking out: Learn more at http://developer.vive.com/resources.
  2. VIVE SRWorks SDK

    Last week VIVE announced the VIVE SRWorks SDK, allowing developers to access the stereo front facing cameras on the VIVE Pro. Developers will now be able to perform 3D perception and depth sensing with the stereo RGB sensors. From the announcement: The SDK includes plugins for Unity and Unreal. VIVE also included a few videos worth checking out: Learn more at http://developer.vive.com/resources. View full story
  3. I am an audio researcher developing new audiovisual technologies and currently interested in new applications for games, especially in areas of VR arcades, large immersive spaces, 360 degree installations and even escape rooms. I am wondering if anyone has any ideas how to get 32 independent channels (or more) of audio output in real-time from a game engine like Unity that can be spatially mapped to XY coordinates of virtual objects in a screen, or the XYZ coordinates for a spatial enclosure, when most game engines only allow for fixed pre-defined output formats such as stereo, 5.1 or 7.1. I have an executive summary of the technology online at (the link also includes my email address): http://bit.ly/pixelphonics Thanks, M
  4. Dev Log 1

    Being approached with the task to create a ‘calming’ experience for LiminalVR users was juxtaposing because at first we were absolutely not calm with our approach to research and our aggressive surveys distributed over social media (Which by the way, feel free to take part in here and here). However, a week later the team had a meeting with LiminalVR and were given access to their concentrated psychology documentation which, to say the least, was a lighthouse in the fog of endless research. The research provided to us allowed us to decide on creating the natural setting that we wanted, with factors of detail such as colour and vegetation types that allow for a calming user experience (we hope!) The terrain itself was generated with World Machine, using a low resolution to ensure its cost remain low for mobile optimisation. The terrain, when translated across into Unity, had some scaling issues and as a result, the long rolling meadows that were seen in World Machine imported much smaller. To fix this issue we doubled the size of the terrain but as a result, we discovered that we had lost a lot of our ability to create finer details when painting textures. However, as this is essentially saving cost and the painted roads will be in the distance, we decided to push forward. Itween was used to create the curve in which the lantern follows, travelling at an increasing speed as it moves further from point A towards point B. The lantern model is still underway, however this will be one of the final features that will be implemented. On feedback we changed the initial idea from dusk to dawn and to really harness the colours of an early morning sunrise, we used optimised volumetric lighting beams to simulate the sun rising in the morning. It was extremely challenging to simulate atmospheric fog inside of Unity that is mobile optimised and after research we decided to create a cylinder to surround the terrain with a low alpha material on the inside which gives a low cost effect of fog. This encompassed with Unity’s inbuilt fog feature allowed to create a believable environment. User Input is required at the start of the experience, the player simply must use their head to turn and look at one of three pieces of paper that represent most how they are feeling, this is a feature that is currently being worked on in a test scene and will be migrated over to the experience on completion. Next up we will be working on polishing, grass, textures, finalising models and audio. Stay tuned and watch this space! Sincerely, Team Tuff Knight P.S - Follow us on Twitter for regular updates! @BraydenBeavis @MohamadAlRida
  5. Hello, and welcome dear reader to my upcomming long term project 'Spark' I'm planning for a while now. My name is Bastian, I'm working as professional in games business for a couple of years as Senior Software Developer and hobby engine architect and am going to start running a project soon that is targeting the following thoughts based on this forum discussion Problem Many hobby projects and small studios out there don't have the financial/man-power capacity or experience to make good looking game maps as of the discussion above; but also while I read through this forum for some years now, I have seen more artist requests than any programmer requests. The reason might be systems like Unreal or Unity that themselfs provide a large non-coding game making support by blue-prints, asset store content and whatever is there in addition designers can take to reach there goal. While this is great for designers and small game creation teams, there isn't such a thing for pure coders (like me) that aren't capable of doing level design or modeling. The so called "programmer's graphics" This is sadly a factor that leads to most projects failure because people tend to support such projects that look beatifull but may lack some gameplay functionality against those projects that have the fully featured gameplay ready but dont get an artist to do the environmental work. And not every game developer has some artists in it's connections. This and the fact that I personally love multiplayer (online or mmo-games are just multiplayer) RPGs, I decided to go for tis project after doing game engine development from scratch over several years now. Spark Is a product of several thoughts combined into one single software package that supports a basic, modular game engine to extend for whatever multiplayer/rpg game one decides to develop, that already has a range of functions implemented to support all the necessary systems like character management, inventory management or UI, along with an SDK to provide utility functions for a range of use-cases like player authentication or content packaging written in C++ and C# (for the utility tools). I currently decide if the package should also contain a special game-server implementation that is supporting the general gameplay interface. But whait, what makes the project unique from what is already out there? The plan is to provide more game creation features and less content editing necessity in the first level of the game. Content like world maps, quests and even assets can be generated procedurally using a set of defined rules to tell a generator unit a context taken into account to decide what should be generated. This can be map data/landscape data, fully playable (maybe limitless) maps and even assets to place on those maps including environment, plants, trees and a lot more. Gameplay content can be created too. A generator can run in the background or on a server to create new quests while the game runs including any dialog and log text for supported languages as same as potentially voice overs. I'm currently doing the research for the translation unit that should be able to generate text in English and Japanese for now (other languages may be extended) as not fully perfect a native speaker would write but acceptable enougth and simple enougth to fit into the plan. But yeah, you reader may have still some doubts about it. Let me tell you from a talk I had past time with a good friend from a grand publishing and development studio. That friend told me that they are developing an AI for one of there games, that should create content for that game after learning from there best level designers and the community. You see, this isn't a crazy backyard idea but also something even an AAA studio is planning. I'm also playing arround with the thought to make this also VR compatible for current and upcomming technology so this wont be a one-shot project but something that we can base on and continiously enhance over the months and years. Motivation I'm totally self motivated to run the project simply from passion for playing games that have quality and mesmerize me with or without a story, regardless of fantasy, sci-fy or steam punk, RPG or shooter. Games worth playing are played but there is a problem with stagnanting quality over the past 20 years that makes me sad. I now want to tell my own stories, show my own worlds to others and play like I would live in the game while I have my all-day job so don't need to do this for profit (yet). So this is not only an SDK or game engine project but also a multiplayer RPG project who's core system can be used from other people for free to setup there own ideas, make there own stories and let others explore there own worlds with certain kind of compatibility between those games for player data and mods. While I develop on my every day practice with a team, I do it on my own in spare time so the decision for this request post was simply to get some people together that may or may not share my passion for good games and are also moivated and reliable enougth to bring this to a happy ending over the next year or two up to a playable demo version to maybe pitch for more support. Closure I thank you reader and congrats for reaching the last point of my post. What I want to do might sound as a huge never ending project that will fail but my motivation is there even after years and prototypes of game engine development so if you think you could hold this kind of motivation even a single bit, are reliable, experienced with C++ and/or C# or an artist (any other matching role could be also usefull for Spark) and could work at least a day in the week, then I would be happy if you would leave a message, either in this topic, as PM or Skype/Discord chat. I will meanwhile finish my framework work (ha double spending ) and do some technical and game design for this. Dont let me wait too long and thank you for reading! Greetings!!
  6. More Contract Work

    It almost feels like it hasn't been worth writing an update for the last month because so little "progress" has been made on Spellbound. But I suppose such is life, and it too must be captured and noted as a part of the journey of an indie developer. I have still been doing various contract projects for both corporate clients and small game studios. On the contracting side, I've decided that it would be a good idea to subcontract work I can't do to other people and then add my management fee to their rates. I currently have my former artist working on a small contract project, so it is a viable business idea. He charges me $35/hour and I charge the client $50/hour for his work and I keep the difference. It's not much, but its a good start. In the future, I will raise his rates and pay him more when there is more work and larger projects, but I don't want to make public promises I can't keep. The hard part will be finding enough work to keep everyone busy. I've also been playing a light support role to my girlfriend. Her business is taking off and she's easily become the primary bread winner of the household and that relieves financial pressure from me, allowing me to continue working with minimal income. I can't stress enough how grateful I am and what an impact it has on my creative pursuits. A few days ago, she had a senator from China come and visit her company and our ranch. He was really interested in seeing my VR game, so I gave him a demo in my office. My roommates are all sales people as well, so they got to try out the game at the same time. One of them was instantly motion sick, but the other really enjoyed it. Probably the best takeaway from this was just how bad my user interfaces actually are -- they are not intuitive enough at all for completely new people to use. Also, the pacing of the action is also too rapid for novices, so I'll need to redesign my tutorial level to be more "tutorial" focused than story/immersion. Anyways, the Chinese senator was very impressed with what I'd been working on. I have a feeling that I may have a trip out to China in my eventual future. I think the Chinese market for VR is thirstier for content than the North American market, so it would be great for me to see first hand what the market landscape looks like. A fellow VR game dev told me the other night that he's been wanting to show my game to other people, but the trailer for the game is so out of date that it doesn't do the game proper justice. I completely agree, it's two years old and features old technology which I don't support anymore. Here's the stupidest objection in the whole world: I don't know how to produce a good game trailer. This is extra stupid because... I work in an office filled with film people who could help me. What's wrong with me? I'm a bit afraid to ask for help knowing I have no money to offer. I have been doing a lot of reading of epic fantasy books on the bus ride too and from work. I'm currently reading through the "Legend of Drizzt" series by R.A. Salvatore. Every time I read one of these epic fantasy books, I feel totally inadequate as a writer. I have a lot of self doubt that I could produce anything as good. Despite that, I'm going to have to push hard and write out a story for Spellbound. The writing is going much slower than I would have liked due to various distractions (ahem, contract work and lack of funding). I also feel a bit daunted/overwhelmed by the size of the writing project and what it's going to take. I should just shut up, stop whining, and start writing. "Yeah, Eric! Quit yer moanin', bitchin' and belly aching and get back to writing!" *whip crack* I have been entertaining the idea of producing another type of nature VR travel experience using 360 videos. It would be much easier and faster to produce and could turn into a new revenue source to fund my development of Spellbound and build my brand a teeny bit more. I must find some time to produce a rough prototype and see if its technologically viable. I've written out a 2 page business plan and it seems pretty good (but all of our own ideas sound good!). This idea has passed through my feasibility filters and its time to start figuring out what it would take to produce. Anyways, it doesn't hurt to give it a try and see what happens. On another note, I think some of my best ideas come to me while I'm walking to work. There's just something creatively magical about the act of walking and thinking. It really gets the juices going. I remember this one time I was working in Iraq on a tough problem with relational databases. Somehow, I had to get multiple records from one table to match multiple records from another table. I couldn't figure it out for days while sitting at my desk, but then I went for a long walk on base and solved it in my head. I came back, implemented it, and it worked perfectly -- it required an intermediary table to store lookups. Two days ago, I was walking a mile to my bus stop (in the rain) thinking about "stuff". The night before, I had been tutoring my girlfriends son on math homework. I have also given lectures at my former university and local meetups on game development and design. I have worked in Iraq and Afghanistan to rebuild war torn societies, and through my experience, I have concluded that the underlying foundation for a peaceful and prosperous society is an educated society. So, if you want to bring peace, prosperity and compassion to the world, start by educating people. I happen to love the acquisition of wisdom and the feeling of enlightenment it brings, so my way of sharing that is by teaching people what I know and hoping they too can share my passion. On my walk, I got to thinking: What if I give lectures in VR where people can learn something? It would be done within the universe of Spellbound, so the learning experience would be within a classroom of budding wizards, being taught be an old, gray bearded wizard (me). The character animations could be driven by a mocap suit and the voice could be recorded easily enough. The instructional material would be framed in the context of things wizards care about, so I'd be giving an hour long class on the intricacies of alchemy and brewing a witches pot, and it would be about selecting the right proportion of herbs, spices, ingredients, and cantrips. On the surface, it would be a lesson on magical brews, but in truth, it's a lesson on fractions and ratios. It would be a great fake out, where people come into a classroom expecting an hour of entertainment (which it is!) but they'd really get an hour of education. But, the lesson would be framed and presented in such a way that the audience doesn't realize its learning something else which is valuable in the real world too! I could produce a dozen lectures on various topics of interest, framed in the context of advanced wizardry, and people could attend my lectures in VR. If I can convey my enthusiasm for the subject, it'll be infectious and people will want to see all of the other lectures. What seemed like a action role playing game on the surface, had a lot of secret surprises on the back end. Some people may not be interested in this academic part of the game and prefer action and adventure, but others may be only interested in the academic side -- There's nothing wrong with wizards who spend most of their time in the academy advancing their own knowledge. After all, that's what wizards are predominantly known for! I think if I embed secret rune combinations within the lessons, students can get unique magical rewards by paying attention in class and it can be just as rewarding as exploring an ancient dungeon. I like this idea; I'll have to think about it more and let it ruminate. Lastly, I've been continuing my work with the Leap Motion and integrating it with 360 video. Check it out here: I heard from my partner that some sales guy saw our work and liked it so much that he said if we finish this app, he'd be willing to sell our services to other companies. If that brings in more work and it pays well, I'd be all for it. I'd eventually want to hire someone else to work for me and take over the production and I'd move myself into more of a creative managerial role, but for now, I have to keep building out the tech and envisioning how this will work. I've been trying to unite the film industry and the gaming industry for over a year, so this sort of represents a culmination of my efforts and helps create a sort of new type of media. I'm excited to see where other creatives can take this. Anyways, I still have a lot more work to do here and this is still evolving quickly, but I think what we're building here may be the first of its kind in the world. I'm excited.
  7. I`m looking for some project to boost up my portfolio, I`m not a pro but I`m not bad at all. Feel free to contact me.
  8. Check out my new Youtube video where I talk about Dreamart VR, a Virtual Reality project that I am working on !
  9. Hi, ok, so, we are having problems with our current mirror reflection implementation. At the moment we are doing it very simple, so for the i-th frame, we calculate the reflection vectors given the viewPoint and some predefined points on the mirror surface (position and normal). Then, using the least squared algorithm, we find the point that has the minimum distance from all these reflections vectors. This is going to be our virtual viewPoint (with the right orientation). After that, we render offscreen to a texture by setting the OpenGL camera on the virtual viewPoint. And finally we use the rendered texture on the mirror surface. So far this has always been fine, but now we are having some more strong constraints on accuracy. What are our best options given that: - we have a dynamic scene, the mirror and parts of the scene can change continuously from frame to frame - we have about 3k points (with normals) per mirror, calculated offline using some cad program (such as Catia) - all the mirror are always perfectly spherical (with different radius vertically and horizontally) and they are always convex - a scene can have up to 10 mirror - it should be fast enough also for vr (Htc Vive) on fastest gpus (only desktops) Looking around, some papers talk about calculating some caustic surface derivation offline, but I don't know if this suits my case Also, another paper, used some acceleration structures to detect the intersection between the reflection vectors and the scene, and then adjust the corresponding texture coordinate. This looks the most accurate but also very heavy from a computational point of view. Other than that, I couldn't find anything updated/exhaustive around, can you help me? Thanks in advance
  10. VR naked development

    Hi guys, I`m starting to learn game development and I'm aiming it for VR development. Right now I can`t afford any VR equipment so until I can, I want to start learning whatever principles needed that will follow with me to VR when I will get it. I started learning the basics of C# and a little bit (play around) with Unity. I have a lot of mess in my head and I want to make it efficient as possible because I`m self-learn all of it. I want to make an efficient syllabus to follow, milestones, to know what I learned and what else should I learn and be as efficient as possible at it. After I will know my route, I will polish my plan more specifically. What I need is the information of what exactly I need (and can) to learn right now for VR development, in what order, and recommended resources for it would be much appreciated. Thanks a lot in advance. Sol University
  11. VR in Unity

    I was wondering if anyone here has experience with VR development for Unity. Having previous Unity experience, I'd prefer to stick with Unity but am open to other engines. It's something I've been interested in, and I'm wondering which community/technology is the easiest to use. An Oculus Rift costs around $400, so I'd rather not invest money in that if it doesn't have a big community and support behind it. Another option I was looking at was Google Cardboard for Unity. The guy here has a pretty good starter tutorial on VR dev for Android and the headset is only ~$20 and the Moga controller is only another 20 or so. This is definitely the most economical option, but I'd rather not go down that path if no one uses this technology or if VR on Android is crappy or something. The VR community doesn't seem like it's that big, so I'm having a hard time getting a feel for what's popular and what direction the technology is going.
  12. Chris "Crispy" Pusczak, CEO and Creative Director of SymbioVR, discusses virtual reality and the peripherals in VR that help with a deeper level of immersion. Twitter: https://twitter.com/symbiovr PPTX Slides: Download
  13. Since inception, the internet community has been agog with excitement over every related achievement with virtual reality (VR). From Google I/O to Facebook’s F8, almost every major tech event is seeking to employ this new emerging technology as one of its main features. Today many top app development companies around the globe are getting busing developing VR-enabled apps for various industries beyond gaming. No doubt, it has risen to become a top-profile investment opportunity for startups, growing tech businesses, and top-ranking tech organizations. One area in which VR has gained high popularity is in iPhone app development. This has led to the commercial adoption and mainstream application of virtual reality which before now has been hovering on the periphery of technology. Regardless of geographic, economic, or social disparities, VR is bringing people from around the world to engage and interact together in a virtually-enhanced environment. No wonder it is considered as a productive enhancement to human interaction. Interestingly, app developers are employing VR to provide a huge amount of opportunities for users in the mobile world. These mobile app creators are integrating the technology into iPhone app development to not only promote entertainment – but also enhance effective communication, learning, and facilitate work. While some businesses have already started promoting and demonstrating their products to retail customers with VR, customers, on the other hand, are enjoying real insights and getting duly and better informed about the products or services they are purchasing. How VR is impacting mobile app development Ultimately, computer technology is employed to implement today’s virtual reality. This requires the use of a variety of systems including special gloves, omnidirectional treadmills, and headsets. With these, the human senses are stimulated to develop the illusion of reality. Taking the human physiology into consideration, many mobile developers are taking bold steps to take the innovation one step further by integrating iPhone app development to achieve a better sense of presence. Basically, this can be said to be a new means of introducing mobile users to a more personalized experience. For the first time, objects can now have a sense of spatial presence in an interactive 3D world. Many successful iOS games and apps have proven the ubiquity of virtual reality once perceived as a gimmick. In today’s fast-changing world, developers are utilizing this technology to enable users to explore and interact with the environment to make new discoveries. These explorations are already being witnessed in several industries which include sports, arts, medicine, architecture, education, entertainment and so on. Thanks to iPhone app development, mobile users are already using VR to see and interact with virtual life-sized three-dimensional images. Experiencing emulated, virtual world has completely shut out the reality. Now with HMDs (headsets) and special VR systems, mobile users can effectively perceive the technology right from their devices. Just so you know, the App Store is currently receiving an influx of VR games and apps that are making use of sound effects and audio through speakers or headphones with which spectators can achieve enhanced effects. Now, a gamer can use special VR-enabled devices to become the game character itself. This is simply one obvious example of the use of this technology. Basically, developers have succeeded in integrating VR into iPhone app development to create mobile virtual gaming in which users can engage in gaming activities like walking and looking around as if it were real but simply performed in a virtual, simulated world. One of the first industries to adopt this technology are the entertainment and advertising industries. With iPhone app development, developers have adopted the technology to help marketers and advertisers promote their products. Interestingly, there is no end as to how this is expanding with more and more businesses finding new ways of using it. A common case can be found in the tourism industry where users can engage in virtual tours with this technology. As a matter of fact, people can now have what seems to be a real experience of an activity like visiting the Louvre or hiking the Grand Canyon while being physically present at home. How app developers are getting involved While the VR industry can be said to be in its infancy stage, there are quite a lot of opportunities that can be achieved with this emerging technology. When it comes to developing VR-enabled apps for mobile devices, it is good to know that there are several ways by which developers can come out with engaging products. Basically, it’s all about ensuring full interaction. Rather than simply watching, users are allowed to interact with the virtual environment in which they find themselves. These developers try as much as possible to get viewers fully and actively involved in every step of the way. That’s basically what a virtual reality experience is all about. Interestingly, there are no rules guiding the use and development of the technology thereby revealing more potential to explore. Simply put, there is a boundless space of possibilities with VR in iPhone app development. Developers are free to apply any rules of their choice since it is not limited by any principle. Users, on their own part, can enjoy a truly unique experience in different ways, as they are not restricted to a specific traditional perspective or method. All developers need to do is to create an immersive experience for their users by utilizing a combination of audio effects, a 360-degree video, and 3D still images. Without the right mix of audio-visual features, iOS developers can rarely make their VR content look appealing and function effectively. Remember, this is one feature that requires proper interaction and adequate engagement between users and the visual environment in which they find themselves. Conclusion Many businesses are already seeing the potential of a virtual experience. While some have started taking the bull by the horn (i.e. implementing the technology), many others have already started work and are in the development phase. Obviously, it won’t be long before this technology takes over the whole business space. Never forget that VR is yet to reach its full potential while the trend is growing so powerfully.
  14. Ray tracing 60 FPS on Tablet.

    Hi , I was considering this start up http://adshir.com/, for investment and i would like a little bit of feedback on what the developers community think about the technology. So far what they have is a demo that runs in real time on a Tablet at over 60FPS, it runs locally on the integrated GPU of the i7 . They have a 20 000 triangles dinosaur that looks impressive, better than anything i saw on a mobile device, with reflections and shadows looking very close to what they would look in the real world. They achieved this thanks to a new algorithm of a rendering technique called Path tracing/Ray tracing, that is very demanding and so far it is done mostly for static images. From what i checked around there is no real option for real time ray tracing (60 FPS on consumer devices). There was imagination technologies that were supposed to release a chip that supports real time ray tracing, but i did not found they had a product in the market or even if the technology is finished as their last demo i found was with a PC. The other one is OTOY with their brigade engine that is still not released and if i understand well is more a cloud solution than in hardware solution . Would there be a sizable interest in the developers community in having such a product as a plug-in for existing game engines? How important is Ray tracing to the future of high end real time graphics?
  15. Is it possible to asynchronously create a Texture2D using DirectX11? I have a native Unity plugin that downloads 8K textures from a server and displays them to the user for a VR application. This works well, but there's a large frame drop when calling CreateTexture2D. To remedy this, I've tried creating a separate thread that creates the texture, but the frame drop is still present. Is there anything else that I could do to prevent that frame drop from occuring?
  16. Heroes & Legend is an epic fantasy role play game that I believe will set new standards in role playing. Featuring a rich audio score of over 50+ sound tracks. Currently the game has four on board developers, designers, programmers, and music composers. I am taking on eight more people that are dedicated. You may view six of our audio scores in our first audio enticement video here: Vimeo: YouTube: Gamedev - Project: Gamedev - Blog Company Website - Under Construction http://www.i3dix.com Summary: We are looking for artists familiar with iClone7, iClone Character Creator 2, Blender, PBR, and the 3D Exchange Pipeline. We also need some entry level to proficient Unreal 4 Developers who can help in getting World Max - I, our premier procedural world generator out on Unreal 4 market. This procedural world generator utilizes a 2D Vector Database for SRTM and Natural Earth database importing or creating large worlds smaller or larger than earth with latitude, longitude, Bathymetry and topographical overlay. I am a 25+ year software engineer in charge of the company and would be considered a 10+ year software engineer. Also, I am taking on a couple positions for Java Developers to create our companies premier Content Management System complete with a Web Hosting Module, Project Management Module, Subversion Module, interacting on a Linux System with a LAMP + T setup, subversion repository, who can also manage Network Administration. Assets are synched via one-drive, projects maintained via private GitHub repositories. Will train applicants, so don't be a cissy, try me, and let's see if you have what it takes to be a partner. All potential partners must sign a company NDA (Non-Disclosure Agreement) and Business Agreement via DocuSign. Profit share on all products is 0.025% of the 10% quarterly budgeted net for payment. If you think you have what this takes, then I look forward to hearing from you.
  17. Contract Work

    I need to make money to fund the further development of my game. So, I've been doing paid contract work in VR. Most of the work is pretty easy for me and consists of producing VR applications which run 360 videos with some interactive GUI elements embedded into it. I also have been helping other game developers produce their games. Initially, I charged $50/hour for my early VR programming work. I believed that I needed to figure out the development process and it would take a bit longer because it was new to me, so I felt bad charging a higher rate. I got it figured out now, so I raised my rates to $75/hour. I... think I made a mistake. The way I came up with $75/hour is pretty straight forward. I took my previous annual salary and divided it by the number of hours in a full working year, and that gave me a rough ballpark on my hourly rate. The flaw in this approach is that I was assuming that the amount of work I have would be constant, that I would be working a full 40 hours a week with billable hours. The reality is that I have huge gaps between projects, so that means I have huge gaps between billable hours. So, the general intuition would be to increase my hourly rate, right? I think that's also a mistake. The problem is that I've gotten too fast. It used to take me something like 10 hours to produce a 360 VR video app. That's because I built it from scratch. Now, I have a code base and template I reuse. It takes me about 2 hours to produce a simple video app. With an hourly fee structure, it's more profitable for me to work slow so I can charge higher bills. But I can't do that, I'm an honest man and my integrity is priceless to me. I'm also a lazy engineer which causes me to strive for efficiency so I don't have to do tedious, wasteful work. Spending 10 hours on a 2 hour project would feel like a waste of time and an antithesis to common sense. So, I'm tentatively thinking that the correct fee structure is to charge a per project cost. If I quote someone for $5000 to complete a project, that's what I'll charge regardless of how long it takes. If I can finish the project in 5 hours, congrats, I just made $1000/hour. If it takes me 50 hours, then I made $100/hour. Now, I'm properly incentivized to work fast and efficiently. The faster I work, the more rewarding it is. This comes with some risks as well. What if I estimate that a project will take 15 hours, bid accordingly, but it really takes me 30 hours to complete? I'm making another mistake here... I'm not taking profit into account. If I step outside of myself for a moment and pretend that I'm an employee to myself, and employees are paid an hourly rate (let's say $75/hour) and I'm bidding on the cost of a project based off of just my raw production costs, then I make $0 in profit. All of the income goes directly into paying for the employee salaries, leaving nothing for the company, meaning growth is impossible and I lose money over time due to overhead costs. Instead, I should be taking the employee salary ($75/hour) and multiplying it by a factor of at least 2.5x. If I replace myself with a hired employee and keep the same fee structure in place, then the company is equally profitable because I am interchangeable with other workers. If I add more workers to the team, then of course my bid estimates will change. So, the total bid = sum of all wages * 2.5x; For clients, this could be a pretty good system as well. Instead of having runaway costs inflate a project budget, there is a fixed cost of production. My biggest challenge will be to accurately estimate the scope of work and bid accordingly. If I underestimate the scope, then I eat the cost difference. If I overestimate the scope, more profit, more reward! But then, I also come full circle to the original problem I had: If I originally took 10 hours to finish a project and bid accordingly based off of that time estimate, but through experience, innovation and increases in efficiency I now reduce that same work to 2 hours and bid accordingly, I would still be losing the hourly difference. So, do I bid as if I'm starting everything from scratch because my competitors would be in the same position? Or do I look at the requirements of a project and use that as an input parameter into a piece-wise defined function to assess estimated cost? Or, do I just pick high numbers in a random ballpark and hope to get lucky? Obviously, if requirements change, then the cost should change proportionately as well. If I charged a flat $10,000 for a project given its requirements / feature spec, and then a few weeks later the client decides to add/subtract a requirement, how would I figure out how to proportionately adjust the pricing to reflect the change in scope? I... don't... know... One other thing I'm finding annoyance at is that some clients aren't good clients to take on. Indies and startups are bad because they often don't have money, no matter their good intentions and promises. If it's going to break the bank for them to have me work for them, it's likely they'll be unable to pay me or that it will take 6+ months for me to get paid. I owe people money, I can't keep them waiting because I'm waiting to get paid. If they're sweating over my up front fee of $150, I shouldn't take them on as clients. My policy should be, "If I think they can't afford me, they can't afford me.". It may be better to risk leaving money on the table than taking on bad clients. Maybe I should increase my fee to weed them out? Another factor I hadn't considered are the non-billable hours I put into project efforts: Responding to emails and answering phone calls. On some projects, I've put more hours into phone calls, conversations and emails than actual, billable hours. Now, I want to be a nice person and to be easily accessible to my clients, but every hour I spend on email or phone calls is an hour I'm not spending making money. Every hour I'm not making money is also an hour I'm not working on Spellbound. I'm tempted to charge for my time here, but I don't want to start a stopwatch every time my phone rings or I get an email requiring a response. Maybe I should just pad my estimated hours to account for time spent communicating? Or maybe I should measure the average amount of time I spend doing administrative stuff on behalf of a project, and adjust my multiplier accordingly? Instead of a 2.5x hourly rate, maybe 3.5x? The last few factors I also hadn't been considering is that I'm a freelancer, with talent and experience, ready to hit the ground running, today. I'm not an employee, so I don't get "company benefits". No medical. No dental. No vision. No retirement fund matching. No overhead costs (HR, managers, office space, parking, cafeterias, admin staff, etc). When the project is complete, I am done and go away -- an employee would still incur costs afterwards. No employee liability. Don't like me or my work? Fire me, no mess, no HR hassle, no legal wrangling. That means I have to pay for all of that stuff out of my own pocket, so I need to charge more as a contractor. My girlfriend has taken ample opportunities to remind me that I'm not charging enough. She told me that based on my skill set, I would be equivalent to a "technical editor" in the Hollywood film industry, and they charge something like $175/hour. Based on my background and experience, and how niche my industry is, she believes I should be charging at least $300/hour. That... makes me a bit pale to consider as an hourly rate. I have a hard time believing I'm worth it. But hey, if I can complete a project in hours which would take other people 5-10x longer, if not more, than maybe I am worth it. I recently went and visited a motion capture studio near my office to figure out how I can use them and what their rates are. They charge $3750 for 4 hours, or $8000 for 8 hours. That's a lot of money for a poor indie like me, but... really, it's not a lot of money at all when you think about it. I should be charging roughly in that ball park, right? Deep down inside, I think I feel afraid to charge a lot of money for what I do. But I think I need to reframe the way I think about this. People aren't hiring *me*, they're hiring *my production company*, and for now, I just happen to be the sole employee. If I staff up in the future, I wouldn't feel bad charging high rates to cover my costs. But staffing up would also mean I have to dedicate a significant chunk of time towards staff training, and I'm capable of training staff, so... that means I'm pretty good, right? I guess I just see the work that I do as "easy" and "enjoyable" and I shouldn't be getting paid for this. But, the work is only easy for me because I've got 18 years of experience and the projects I take on are 10x easier than writing my own game engine from scratch, or building enterprise systems for the military. Truly, the biggest risk for me is that the work is such a cakewalk for me that I am bored by it. I was realizing this afternoon that I'm most incentivized to work on other peoples' projects when I'm getting paid really well for them. $75 per hour is not enough money to motivate me to overcome my boredom, but $150/hour is. My girlfriend also tells me that I'm terrible at business, that I don't really have the head for it. I half believe her because she's a lot more experienced than I am, and she's bringing in a lot more money than I am. I've been thinking carefully about what I'm currently doing, how it's not profitable, and what I need to do in order to make my work profitable and worth my time. With my current flow of contract work and my billing rates, I don't make enough money. Honestly, it's just barely enough to pay my cheap office rent. I'm practically treading water, getting nowhere even though I'm working hard. For the last few weeks, I've been thinking that I need to get more proactive about getting money. I need to get out of my chair, put on a nice dress suit, take my VR goggles, and go door to door at every company and show them what I can do for them and how it can help their business. I need to figure out my sales pitch, refine it, and go get myself some big work. I believe in VR, I think its the future, I am bullish on its prospects, and I can sell. I have proven to myself that I have the personality and capability to sell, I can build what I sell, so... I should just get up and go do it. I'm optimistic that I could do well, but I'm sort of holding myself back somehow. The dream is that I do well enough at bootstrapping that I can work myself out of every job and become more of a CEO/producer type, hiring people to replace me. Programmer? Hire that out. Sales guy? Hire that out. Film guy? Hire that out. Hire people for everything -- delegate -- don't get my hands dirty, don't get into the weeds. If I do, I'm still doing it wrong. While I'm fully capable of writing code and producing everything myself, I can't scale. I would be just one guy, taking on projects with a scope of what only one guy can complete. Big projects = big money. I also sort of think that I should split my time 50/50 between providing services to clients and creating my own software applications and releasing them online. The problem with exclusively doing work for clients is that it fixes my scalability to whatever workload my production company can handle. My throughput is fixed, and thus my income is limited by my throughput. It would be a trap which limits my growth potential. However, if I build and release my own apps at the same time, my growth potential is limited only by my marketing and sales capabilities. Once an app is completed, I can make an infinite number of copies in an instant and sell them. If I diversify and make several apps in several different market categories, a few of them are bound to succeed. I have been particularly infected by an idea which could potentially establish a new market category for content in the VR market (I'll share details after I execute). If I can produce it, market it, and sell it, and it thrives, then I could scale it out and go big. I'm planning on creating a working prototype this spring and releasing it to the market to see how it fares. Anyways, the point is that it would be easier to make $1m by scaling out a successful app than by scaling out client services, but a successful app could also be an additional service category offered to clients. However I do it, I will fund the production of Spellbound and I will have a well funded team working on it...eventually. Anyways, I did something cool the other day. I integrated Leap Motion with 360 videos, so you can use your own hands to pan the camera around. I'm also going to add in finger taps for pressing buttons, so people can feel sort of like Tom Cruise in Minority Report. The placeholder video was shot a month ago at a Dell factory in China as a part of their effort to be transparent about their production pipeline. Check it out:
  18. Have some UE4 experience with C++, some c# (outside of unity), mostly Java/JavaScript/PHP oriented background. Just looking to get more practice in the game development area. LF UE4 preferrably, but am open to anything. Reply here and I will be in touch! Thanks -Andrew
  19. Hello guys I need tutorial to learn How can i create a game server for save my game from hack
  20. The European market for VR, AR, and MR is competing with those in the US and Asia, according to a new report by VR Intelligence and SuperData. With the help of industry experts from Epic, KLM and nDreams, the free report explores the biggest opportunities for driving mass adoption on the content, across consumer and enterprise. The white paper features: Front line insight from senior leaders @ Unreal Engine, KLM and nDreams + brand new data from SuperData Exclusive details on growing and emerging projects in the European market The reasons businesses are (or are not) focusing on the European market Details on which leading companies are driving the European market and why they are ahead The white paper can be downloaded for free from here: http://bit.ly/2nt3rB3. Jasmine Kees, Project Director at VR Intelligence, said, “With this report, we’ve tried to give both a quantitative and qualitative overview of the European VR, AR and MR market. It’s encouraging to see these figures from SuperData, particularly when backed up with such positive words from Epic, KLM and nDreams, gearing us up nicely for VRX Europe in Amsterdam this May”. The white paper can be downloaded for free from here: http://bit.ly/2nt3rB3. For more on VRX Europe 2018 (Amsterdam, May 17-18): http://events.vr-intelligence.com/europe/.
  21. The European market for VR, AR, and MR is competing with those in the US and Asia, according to a new report by VR Intelligence and SuperData. With the help of industry experts from Epic, KLM and nDreams, the free report explores the biggest opportunities for driving mass adoption on the content, across consumer and enterprise. The white paper features: Front line insight from senior leaders @ Unreal Engine, KLM and nDreams + brand new data from SuperData Exclusive details on growing and emerging projects in the European market The reasons businesses are (or are not) focusing on the European market Details on which leading companies are driving the European market and why they are ahead The white paper can be downloaded for free from here: http://bit.ly/2nt3rB3. Jasmine Kees, Project Director at VR Intelligence, said, “With this report, we’ve tried to give both a quantitative and qualitative overview of the European VR, AR and MR market. It’s encouraging to see these figures from SuperData, particularly when backed up with such positive words from Epic, KLM and nDreams, gearing us up nicely for VRX Europe in Amsterdam this May”. The white paper can be downloaded for free from here: http://bit.ly/2nt3rB3. For more on VRX Europe 2018 (Amsterdam, May 17-18): http://events.vr-intelligence.com/europe/. View full story
  22. Unity Studies!

    Hey guys, I’m Jessica, a User Research Coordinator at Unity 3D. We’re working on a few new features that we think might be interesting to you. We are looking for people to help us while we develop new Unity Engine tools. We do this by doing studies, and that's why I am here today. We want and need the voice of the people who both use and don't use Unity, as well as beginners to intermediate and pros. If ANYONE is interested in helping out and getting come cool swag from us, please let me know at jessicaa@unity3d.com If we don’t get back to you due to high volume, we apologize and promise to reach out to you for our future studies. Thanks so much, Jessica
  23. VR Guns And Notes

    Hello everyone, I would like to share with you some info about the game created by VRFactory. Gameplay: Perfect party game straight from the VR Arcades now available to all gamers. Pure fun and entertainment that allows you to immerse yourself in the virtual world! Choose one of three music genres or upload your favourite track. Shoot at the notes coming out of the loudspeakers to score points. When you shoot notes on the same colour one after the other you will score extra combo points. Aim at violin keys and various instruments to score even more points! If you really want to score high, here is a tip - don’t miss! Imagine you are the best music producer in the world. You are sitting in your record studio, working on a new album for your favourite band. As always, you want to get the perfect sound. You play the song once, twice, three times and... That's it - you’ve had enough of this! You pull out two fully loaded guns and start shooting away at all the notes coming at you from all the loudspeakers around you!!! 5 steps to have great fun: 1. Start Guns & Notes 2. Choose one of the three available recording studios: - Classic - Rock - Electronic 3. Upload your favourite track 4. Do Your Best!!! 5. Have fun!!! Genre: Horror / Comedy (?) Platforms: PC Language: English Engine: Unreal Engine 4 Availabe: Steam: http://store.steampowered.com/app/781320/Guns_and_Notes/ Oculus: https://www.oculus.com/experiences/rift/1546467622114483/ Vive: https://www.viveport.com/apps/2fc11068-acb1-467b-b18a-f2613682f118
  24. Stygian VR

    Stygian is a story about a person whose Earth has run it's course and the population is dropping like flies, but they found a way to escape this reality through conscience upload. You now step into the shoes of this person and take control as they make their way through the dimensions. Stygian's goal is to appeal to the emotions and let you experience things you wouldn't be able to in the real world, which I believe is one of the main goals in VR. Each time you leave a dimension, you should feel like you left something behind, but excited to discover what lies ahead, as each dimension is completely unique, strange, and sometimes dangerous... Central rich story accompanied by various paths and danger Thought provoking puzzles Beautiful, unique dimensions (3/15-20) Interactive and immersive VR environments Replay ability! No Stygian play-through will be the same as there are multiple routes and multiple endings! (Enter the wrong dimension and you could be in trouble...)
  25. Hello, and welcome to Puppy Chef Academy! Puppy Chef Academy is a Virtual Reality cooking experience designed to help you learn how to cook without the stress and mess of a real kitchen. The game blends the simple controls of Job Simulator with the innovative gameplay of Cooking Mama, with a splash of visual novel storytelling. Throughout your adventure you’ll cook tasty recipes, learn about cooking, and even make some friends along the way! Today I'm going to talk a little about Puppy Chef Academy as not only a game, but how it helps players learn the one skill that everyone wants: Cooking! The idea for Puppy Chef Academy stemmed from my dissatisfaction with Job Simulator's "cooking" segment. While the control scheme was excellent and held so much potential, unfortunately it didn't satisfy my itch to make actual recipes and felt more like playing with an adult-sized toy kitchen set. I decided to make my own VR cooking game, and thus, Puppy Chef Academy came to be! My main goal for the project was to help less culinary-inclined players overcome their fear of the kitchen. You know who I'm talking about, the ones who've never chopped an onion, boiled water and burned it, and swore never to cook anything again. What those people don't realize is that anyone can cook! Like anything, it just takes time and practice, which unfortunately means you'll inevitably have to clean eggs off a stove top, throw away burnt pasta, and languish in the utter defeat that is seeing your loved one smile through their teeth to tell you your Penne Flambe was good while scraping the rest off into the nearest potted plant when you aren't looking. Puppy Chef Academy is designed to help you feel the accomplishment of gaining culinary skills, minus the risk of failure. The beauty of VR as a medium is that skills you learn in VR carry over into real life, and vice-versa. Surgeons are looking into VR as a training tool to perform life-or-death operations. One of Owlchemy's earlier videos showed one of their team members happily juggling in VR just like he does in real-life. It's incredible, because when the headset is strapped to your face, it truly does become your reality, if only for a brief period of time. Fostering a safe environment to experiment with a skill without the risk of failure is what Puppy Chef Academy aims to do, and how it strives to accomplish that is explained further below: Firstly, the techniques. As far as I know, no one has mentioned anything about the gravity feeling strange in Puppy Chef Academy, which is great. It means that I've done my job correctly. What players don't realize is that the world in Puppy Chef Academy seems to be a little smaller than ours, resulting in a lower gravitational pull. I'm joking, the gravity is set slightly lower than "real" physics. But why is that? Isn't the point of learning to cook in VR supposed to be a "realistic" experience? No! The slightly lower gravity is a very deliberate choice. The reason being is that the "realism" isn't as important as learning the movements and techniques. Did your elementary school have "juggling days" where you and 20 other kids were corralled into the gym to learn how to juggle scarves? No one juggles scarves professionally, that's not what juggling scarves is about (and if you do juggle scarves professionally, thank you for making me feel better about my career choices), it's about learning the movements that transfer over to juggling other things. Juggle a scarf, juggle two scarves, three, then juggle one ball, two balls, three, so on and so forth. It's about technique, which for the most part, the lowered gravity (and higher air friction, in the case of scarves) helps you learn. Like juggling scarves, Puppy Chef Academy helps you build confidence in your cooking techniques. The day I flipped an egg through the air and landed it in the pan perfectly was the day I realized I had made something truly unique, as up until that point I had never flipped an egg like that before. It wasn't until I reached several hundreds of hours playtesting Puppy Chef Academy and trying to nail the pan flipping technique in VR (juggling the metaphorical scarf) that I finally felt the confidence to do it in real life. I didn't even think about it, because subconsciously I had flipped hundreds of omelettes and eggs already! When you hear about the untapped potential of VR that so many devs, users, and analysts talk about when they discuss VR’s future as a medium, that’s what they’re talking about. And by that, I mean the skill learning, not the egg flipping (though egg flipping is pretty cool though, at least it impresses the missus!). So we covered how VR as a medium can help build the player’s confidence to learn new skills. Unfortunately, that alone isn’t enough to keep players engaged. What else can we cram into each recipe to make players feel excited to learn about cooking? Simple. Story, and history. From recipe to recipe, a story unfolds that bridges the recipes together and keeps players on the edge of their seat, excited to see what happens after each episode. Between steps, the characters will give an abridged summary of the dish’s history; sure, you may have ordered miso soup at your favorite Chinese restaurant before, but did you know that miso soup used to be a luxury consumed only by nobles? In Puppy Chef Academy, you learn interesting facts like that about every recipe you make. The combination of story and history tying together interactive segments make for an experience that is not only engaging, but also educational (without the boring homework assignments!). What better way to learn than to have fun while you do it, right? What I’m trying to get at here is that by interweaving gameplay, story, and history, Puppy Chef Academy helps players learn how to cook without even realizing it! While there may be some who don’t find the idea of visual novels, culinary history, or even VR at all appealing, I believe Puppy Chef Academy has hit the right balance of the three to bring something truly unique to the medium; both as an educational experience, and as a game. With any luck, hopefully future home chefs will pick up the game and feel the same way about it too! And of course, I'll add an option to play without the story. Anyway, thank you for taking the time to read the first devlog for Puppy Chef Academy. If you'd like to find out more about the game, feel free to take a look at the links for the game below! Until next time, - Tom Website: http://www.puppychefacademy.com Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/PuppyChefAcademy Discord: https://discord.gg/tJ6aZdV Reddit: http://www.reddit.com/r/puppychefacademy
  • Advertisement