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Found 365 results

  1. I have a diagnosed math disability and I really struggled with PreCalculus this semester. I know I won't be doing much with Calculus as software engineer because I don't want to be involved professionally with a game company. I think I have the ability to pass the course, but it takes me a very long time to study and resultingly leaves me very little time to study for my other classes. This makes it very difficult for me to keep up my GPA. I tend to only get "passing" grades in Math subjects regardless. Also, I have to attend full-time because of the requirements for the Financial Aid I need to have to pay for college. Computer Science majors need to attend both Calculus 1 and Calculus 2. The Computer Science Department in my college doesn't allow us to make our own custom degrees. However, I do want to continue making games as a hobby. I want to be able to learn how to do fairly "fancy" things like create procedurally-generated worlds, and I want to have at least some ability to create AI for monsters and such. My question is, knowing this, should I see if I can get a waiver for Calculus 1 and 2?
  2. there are many options in front of me to select like 1)-unreal engine 2)-game with js 3)-c++ in these three which should i do first and if there is anyting new anyone wanted to suggest then please feel free to do it
  3. Hi everybody, So, me and my colleagues are now joining Unity Game Jam. It's gonna be two weeks and we are trying to make a Third Person Shooter with RPG and RTT mechanics video game. We've started yesterday with the main concept and this is what we have: Game Storyline Nobody could imagine the falling of the whole world until the deaths woke up. That nonliving ones became something we cannot consider as human being. They change into a new creature, stronger, more frightening, and almost unbeatable. Society broke in pieces and the few ones alive had to survive at any cost. As the Major of a ranger platoon you have found an abandoned Military Outpost crowded of helpless people closer to one of the coldest parts in the world. You must keep them in safe until the reinforcements arrive. There’s only one way to kill the damn zombies: the BlockchainZ Ammo. Search for the BlockchainZ Ammo and destroy the hordes of zombies, but beware of the raiders: they will take your BlockchainZ Ammo whatever it takes. Right now the Raiders have all the BlockchainZ ammo, you must fight them and spoil it, but be on guard, they will counterattack. Remember, the survival of the people depends on you. Don’t let them down! Gameflow. Once you start playing Project BlockchainZ, you must defend the bunker against the hordes of zombies and raiders on a fixed map where you'll fight with your troops and traps. The bunker is basically the main area where you'll not only have to keep the people within alive, but also yourself during the reinforcements arrive. The zombies are extremely resistant, so you will need a type of ammo called BlockchainZ, which contains a very strong poison that acts directly against the brain traveling through the body. The BlockchainZ Ammo is hidden in Raiders's Facility Bases and you must spoil it from them. The more B-Z Ammo you spoil, the more Raiders will attack you, increasing the game difficulty level. Features. Third Person Shooter. Tactical map to manage your troops across the battle. Deploy defensive elements to direct the action where you want. Post apocalypse - scify style. RPG character development. Right now, we've just opened our Project page in the forum. We only have two weeks to develope this idea. Our team is formed by two programmers, one game designer/ scriptwriter and one artist. So, we will update this thread to show you our improvements. Hope you like it. Any suggestions are always welcome. Thanks for all the support!
  4. So my only coding experience is with writing Interactive Fiction games with Inform, so I get the logic and stuff, but, I'm so used to starting with a program with libraries and assets already built in, that I have no idea how to build something from scratch. I'm would like to make this simulation game where the player is a student in a [magic] school, and I've got stats for the students, their personality types, and ideas on how that should effect their performance in class, and experience rates, and all this data in a google spreadsheet, but I have NO idea how to start creating this game on a code level. So, I'm just struggling on finding out how to get started. Can anybody give me some advice?
  5. Throughout my game programming courses I've been developing essentially a prototype for the game I ultimately want to make. We have a class in the curriculum that teaches us about the Proof of Concept and how to develop it. I plan to finish the prototype, hopefully within the next few months with a small group of friends. Ok that's great, I have a prototype, I have a proof of concept, what do I do now? What's the best way to get this out there, how do I pitch these two things? What's the classic method for getting these into people's hands, make a meeting with a publisher and see if they'll bite? Is crowdsourcing a better option for a small team? Does it have distinct advantages over the classic method? Are there disadvantages to crowdsourcing that a small team should be aware of? In the PoC you list the game's selling points, do those translate effectively into a crowdsourcing program account? I've seen the power of crowdsourcing, I mean Star Citizen just hit $200M, but I'm no Chris Roberts. For us non-legends of the video game world, what's effective and why?
  6. Hi, I am looking for some software that can serve as a starting point for a game editor. What I mean by that is that I want something that provides some of the essential/common functions you would find in an editor, but that is intended to be customized and used to create a domain specific editor. Does anyone know of something like that? -Josh
  7. What is a rendering engine and how to design 3d rendering engine on top of directx. or if you know any book about rendering engine design in details , can you please name it, or a class diagram will be helpful too What i found out it's some kind of abstraction of the most redundant basic functionality like start render, stop rendering clear etc but I cannot find a source that explains this in details. like what a renderer engine should and shouldn't look like, for example the kind of functionalities that it should or shouldn't contain
  8. I am currently an undergrad several months from graduation. My major is in Game Programming and Development. During the course of my studies, we've had a few modeling classes and I really took to it and feel that is the direction I really want to go, specifically I would love to become a character artist. I keep hearing about your portfolio being super important, but I've really never been able to find out what kind of work is best to put into my portfolio. There's no "put 2 of these and 1 of those in," kind of tips. I get that I'll want to put some characters I've modeled in there, but I guess what I really want to know is, if I want my portfolio to be noticed and taken seriously for a character artist position, what is the best way to present it? Since most of my courses have dealt more with programming, I need to build everything for my modeling portfolio on the side, outside of class on my own time. I know there are no specific numbers like: put 3 realistic humans, 2 robots, a creature, and a stylistic character in your portfolio. But as a general rule is there some kind basic guideline or tips for what to make to get your portfolio off to a good start?
  9. Hi, Can some people here look over our Indie game website? We want to have a great website, so be as mean as possible! Website address is below: www.FallenAngelSoftware.com Everything on the above site is 100% FREE. Some games are even open-source. Any complaints or suggestions for improvement would be appreciated! Thanks in advance! Jesse
  10. I plan on making a top-down sprite based game that has gameplay in a combination of Fire Emblem and Final Fantasy, meaning that the battlefield would be grid-based and units have different attacks and ranges, but that every unit goes in a turn according to speed as opposed to fire emblem which has the entirety of a side move at once. In the overworld I plan on having puzzles and diagonal movement akin to Earthbound or Octopath Traveler. RPGmaker seems to be a poor choice here because it lacks real diagonal support or any real changes to the turn-based combat. But that begs the question of what engine to use, or if I should make my own?
  11. I am a solo developer, and I've been working on a mobile top down shooter. I've been struggling to come up with an appealing art style to use, but I'm leaning towards a cartoony, flat/cell shaded art style with thick black outlines. I want it to be kind of gritty and messy though (like rough, mouse drawn outlines and shading). The problem is, I can't find this style anywhere else, so I can only go off of the very vague idea in my head (very hard to describe or actually create). The YouTube channel BlackThornProd uses an art style somewhat similar to this. Does anyone know of any games with this art style? Any other thoughts? My second problem is trying to come up with generic map ideas. I want the game to have both futuristic / modern / medieval weapons, but I'm not sure how to include all this without everything feeling out of place. I don't want the maps to lean too far in a certain direction either. Like I could just have a desert map, but how do I make it interesting without any man made structures. I'm not sure of many games that don't have a setting like this, so its hard to come up with ideas. There is BTD5, but those maps couldn't apply to my game. I was also looking at TF2 and Overwatch, but none of these games have what I'm looking for. I would love to here any ideas or thoughts you have! Should I scrap all my ideas ;) ? Thanks for your help!
  12. Hello, The current questionable design: I have lava that kills the player when it hits it. The logic to play the death explosion is in the object the player hits. When I did this I was influenced by what I read about Sims object design. By placing the logic in the object it's easy to add more objects with different logic. The downside is that responses are distributed in all the objects. The upside is that I don't have to write code for handling damage events and responses, and mapping damage types to death animations etc. I do feel this would be inappropriate for things like projectiles, and enemy attacks. However because the object it hits is Static I figured it'd be ok. The Ask: So, what are your thoughts and what would you consider a good design?
  13. First of all, I want to greet everyone with my first post on this amazing forum! And the question, actually is (please, don't judge strictly)... Say, I have a GDD (which I'm working on now) of a first-person adventure game with puzzles and quests elements in a detective genre for a PC platform. As I can see from my perspective, the road ahead is quite long and windy, but let's assume that the GDD is ready. What is the best way to create a Proof-Of-Concept, or a simple Prototype if I don't have proper skills of an artist and currently have a pretty low budget? Is there any engines with free or relatively cheap templates for what I want to do? I have programming skills on a high level, but I don't want to spend much time on coding and concentrate more on storytelling and game design. Is there a way to deal with this taking into account my current limitations, or does the next step (post-GDD step) requires building a team yet? Thank you!
  14. Note: we received this article as a submission from an author who wishes to remain anonymous. We will endeavor to pass on any feedback or questions and post responses. It can be hard to judge the quality of your own video game. You've worked hard and poured your heart and soul into it, and it's easy to forgive things that others will find off-putting. You've probably played it a lot during the process and will have become accustomed to things that might be jarring for others. On the flip side, creators can be their own worst critic; it can be easy to become hyper-critical and notice all the little flaws or rough edges that your audience may not care about or even be aware of. Obviously, it's hugely beneficial to get feedback from others and to playtest your game, but it can be hard to find reliable feedback, and you may be hesitant to do so in the earlier stages of development. How then, can you reliably judge the quality of your game so that you can be sure you're making your best product? One solution is to use references. Visual References You might have seen an artist painting or drawing something that's right there in front of them; stopping to check and adjust details as they go. The perfect way to ensure your artwork matches the real thing! But what if they can't work in front of their real subject? They might refer to one or more photos of their subject (or a similar one) instead. This is a reference; something to refer to, to check the details. You can do this too! You don't need to copy a subject exactly, like a learning artist faithfully rendering a fruit bowl - your subject may not even be something that exists in the real world! Perhaps your video game features fantastical monsters, mysterious aliens, or any number of imaginative creations. Fortunately, you can still use references for smaller portions of your work. A selection of eyes for inspiration. Perhaps you need some striking eyes for your alien species. Claws for a vicious monster. Rippling muscled limbs for a powerful beast of burden. Whatever it is that you're after, with some quick searching you'll be able to build a quick collection of reference images for inspiration and to check that the details of your work are realistic. Along with a good handle on fundamental art skills, the use of reference images can allow you to quickly judge and improve the quality of your work. Feature References Visual references are fairly obvious once you've thought of them, but we can use references in other ways too. Is your game complete, or is it missing things it might need to really capture an audience? Compare to similar games to see if you've implemented all of the features players are likely to expect, and if similar games have something that yours don't, think about whether not having that feature is an improvement (sometimes it is!) or whether it's something your players will miss. Note that in this case when I say similar games I don't necessarily mean something with the same theme and gameplay, which may not exist if you're producing something creative, but rather something that would be played by a similar audience. Maybe no one else is creating a hack & slash game where you can establish and explore romantic relations with your weapons, but you could still look at both action RPG titles and dating simulations to see if you've included everything players of those genres might expect. Making a lightweight casual puzzle? Look at other hyper-casual games. Hardcore simulation? Look at other in-depth sims. Does your game offer the input methods players will expect? Do other games in your genre all offer unlockable characters? Is your game accessible? Do you have that neat screenshot-sharing feature your competitors all offer? Quality References Your art looks great. You have all the features players might expect. But is your game polished enough? The good thing about judging quality is you can even compare to games that have wildly different gameplay. Instead, you would want to compare your game to others of a similar price point: if you're making a small free-to-play puzzle, don't compare to a blockbuster AAA game. Do your screenshots grab attention like those of your chosen references? Are the animations as smooth? Is there a consistent theme, or is that font you chose for the menu options jarring and out of place? Conclusion By finding and comparing your game to references, you can more easily judge the quality of your work and see if there are things to improve or add.
  15. In this episode of Madsen's Musings, I detail five things I wish I'd put in my contracts sooner. Wanna learn more about me or my work? Go here: https://madsenstudios.com/ Subscribe to my YouTube channel or follow me here on GameDev.net to see all the latest updates. A transcript is provided below the video. Transcript I mean, it's cloudy, but the weather's like 75°F up here. It was awesome, whoo, love it. If only Austin was like this all the time. Okay, So, we're talking about contracts today -- yay, contracts -- legal stuff. First off, disclaimer: I am NOT a lawyer, I do not play one on TV, I am NOT a law expert, so take what I say with a tiny grain of salt. These are just basically my experiences -- these are basically my observations -- but if you have a specific legal issue or question, or if you need some specific legal advice I always STRONGLY recommend talking to an attorney; talking to an expert because that ain't me. [Laugh] Saying "well Nate said on YouTube..." is not gonna hold up in court -- I've tried it! Okay, so, let's talk real quick about what are the basic components of a contract first: A contract is just an outline. It's an agreement. It's saying that Party A is going to do something, Party B in response is gonna do something else. It outlines the specifics of the timeline, any cost related, and it outlines how long the relationship can last between both parties. It outlines how you can end that relationship. It also outlines how the approval process is gonna happen, how the delivery process is gonna happen. It's just a statement. Good contracts are actually supposed to try to protect both parties. That's what negotiations are all about when you're trying to nail down the specifics of a new of a new job you want to make sure that those terms are gonna be something you feel good about. As a freelancer, or if you're looking for an employment position you're going to negotiate the terms of what's your salary, how much PTO you're going to get off the top of the starting, any special considerations. Contracts are just outlines. Okay, so we've defined what a contract is. Let's talk about some of the things I wish I put in my contract sooner. So top of my list: Revision clause Basically, this clause is just capping how many times you're gonna go back to square one and rewrite something. In my opinion -- this is just how I do my contracts -- is if you want me to make something a little faster, bump it up by five clicks, if you want me to change the oboe to a flute, if you want me to -- hopefully there's no angry wind noise there -- if you want me to change this chord from first inversion to second inversion, if you want me to do tiny minute things then I don't consider that a rewrite. I don't consider that a revision. A revision for me is "this is not working, let's go back to square one and start over". That for me is a revision, and in my contract I say for the price I've quoted you, I'm gonna give you three included revisions. Anything past that is an extra cost. Now, I don't list what the actual cost is in my contract, I say that should we go beyond three revisions, what we will do, is we'll have a meeting and we'll discuss things, and we'll make a new cost for this fourth revision and it'll be a mutually agreed upon dollar amount. So maybe it's sloppy of me to not include or quote the price for those additional revisions once you get past the first three free included revisions in that original price, but the thing is, with the exception of this one experience I've never had to use it. But I had a client early on, hired me to write one song that she wanted to use as a part of the pitch to hopefully get funding to make a full Broadway musical, and I was writing music, writing music, working with this client, like I said again, very early in my career, so I gave her version after version after version, each time starting anew. About the fifth or sixth time I asked her "hey, what's not working here, why are we going back and redoing version after version after version and starting from square one?" Well her response kind of shocked me, she said "oh, I just wanted to see what you would do, I just wanted to see what you create", and she even said "I didn't see any kind of revision cap or revision clause in your contract so I figured I could just request as many as I want". And she was right, she could. At no additional costs to her, she could have me writing thousands upon thousands of iterations of this Broadway spec piece. Just over and over again, just to see. Because you have to remember, the more time you take to do something, the less you're actually getting paid per hour. If you have a job you accept for $2,500, and you take five months to do it, you're not actually earning as much than if you have a job that you do in one week for the same $2500. It's a simple concept, but sometimes I think people forget that, and they're talking about their rates, when they're talking about their budgets, and these contracts. So the top of my list would be revision cap. Second thing I wish I added to my contract sooner, is basically says that I as Madsen Studios have the ability and the right to showcase my work in my portfolio. What I've learned, especially working with some larger companies, is in buyout situations particularly they can say "well we're never going to give you the right to put this in your portfolio". You can of course list something on your resume, but you can't showcase it on your demo real or your video reel. You just can't without having some kind of language in your contract that specifically states you can. So my contract states that once a game is made public or once the game is published, I will be able to showcase -- just for promotional reasons -- the content I provided, the content that I created for that game. I've not had any clients object to this when I have it in my contract. I've even had clients put it into their contracts if they're the ones providing the contract to me. I've had "hey, I want to be able to showcase this in portfolio". The only problems I've had is when I didn't ask for it, I didn't have it in my contract, there's nowhere mentioned and I already had signed something and I'm already working and it comes up "hey, I would love to promote myself and promote this work I did, can I put it in my demo reel?" I've had some larger clients say "no you cannot". That kinda sucks, so I learned to start doing that. Let's say a game trailer showed Level One as part of the teaser for the game, and had some of my music I put in Level One, and this is out on YouTube, this is out on the internet - this is live. In that case, I would say "okay, Level One music has been released by that company", and of course there's always political things to consider. I would always talk to my point of contact to say "hey, I love the trailer you guys released, it's using my music, it's out there live per the contract, and says anything that's made public, or once the game's formally released I will be able to share and promote my stuff for promotional reasons on my demo reel." And I would talk with them and say "okay, so since that's been done, let me go ahead and do that real quick, if I want to just shoot you an email and we can talk about it real fast", well I feel like that's a useful thing to do - you don't want to piss anyone off, you don't wanna get yourself in any kind of legal liability, or something like that. In some cases, it can be as easy as just retweeting something, or linking something that the company has already done saying "hey look, I did this", but yeah... that was a weird voice for the "hey look I did this..." You need to have some kind of language in your contract, or in the contract the company is giving you, and you negotiate that saying "I want to be able to share this on my portfolio". And by the way, it's very common to say portfolio: this is not gonna be for downloads, this is not gonna be commercially sold again, that sort of thing, and this mostly only applies in buyout situations. Examples when you were keeping the rights to the music you're providing, you're basically just giving the license to a client, you don't have to worry about that so much, because you are the owner. You might still have to worry about the schedule of it though. You know, perhaps the client doesn't want you to release something that's not made public yet, that's very very common so you do have to be careful about that. Number three for me would be point of contact. Final authority. All this does is dictates -- lays out in black and white -- who was gonna be the person to have authority over saying yes or no in a project. The reason why this is because I've been in situations where you have a group of people and let's say they get into a disagreement and Bobby-Fred does not like the music you did for Level 7, and Judith thinks it's the greatest thing, well then you have a conflict. You have this whole other discussion that has to happen and when you're working as a freelancer and so I will get on these Skype meetings that would be about two-three hours long each, and this was a weekly meeting. And then they would talk about these things, and then they were getting disagreements with me right there in the Skype call. "Well I disagree with you", "well I think this", "well I think that", and suddenly my direction is cluttered. My scope, my target is not clear because I have different points of reference. I have people tell me different things. I have people telling me different direction. So you want to avoid that. In some cases you don't want to worry about this. So if for example, you're working with the team of one person; you had your key contact, you have your final authority. It's that dude or that gal and you just have to make them happy with your content and you're golden. But in other cases where you have multiple people it's very useful to assign and dictate and just ask the client "all right, well I have meetings with eighty of you guys, but I need to know when the proverbial poop hits the fan, who is the person that has final authority to say yes. I would highly recommend if you're working with a team that has multiple people and they don't know who the final authority is that you set something up. You set some terms in your contract saying okay well let's agree that this person will be the final authority, and then you guys can go off and have your debates and your discussion for as long as you want without me involved, and then that one person comes to me and gives me clear, concise direction. Another point to number three is meetings. Are you going to invoice your client for every single meeting that you have. It depends - this is really your call. My advice, my suggestion would be to really understand what type of meeting schedule the client may have in mind. If this is a weekly meeting, then yeah you might want to invoice for that. If it's not then don't worry about it. I kind of take mine case by case. It's really tricky to change a contract once you're in it, so if you don't invoice for meetings, and suddenly find yourself in the situation with the client where you have a whole bunch of meetings all the time, and it's taking up time when you could be working, it's going to be a tricky conversation to say "hey, look...". Nothing is impossible, it's just going to be tricky. It's a lot easier if you just say "hey, if we're going to have this type of meeting weekly then this is my rate for it" and just get that of the way, and they agree to it on the front end versus trying to change it on the back end. That's much much harder to do. Another thing to consider is, each state has sometimes slightly different sometimes very different laws when it comes to freelancing and business, and regulations -- all that jazz -- and if should you have a point of litigation with a client well... let's say the client is out of state, State accounts in California, you're in Texas, well which law is going to be applied here? There's a lot of different things here, but it's just a lot more clear if you just say in the case of litigation, the laws of California will be applied to this contract, or in the case of litigation, the laws of Texas will be applied to this contract. It can be useful to have that listed. Now the big thing I would avoid is P.O. boxes. Do not accept P.O. boxes. I actually don't accept P.O. boxes at all on my contract. What I do is I list all my points of contact. I have my name, my email, I have my cellphone, I have my physical address, and then I have a spot where the client puts theirs in, and I say alright, I need your name, your email, your phone number, and your physical address, and in the state P.O. boxes are not accepted. I guess a little quick blurb. [Joking about the ocean briefly] When you talk about contracts, and you start talking about people getting screwed over, it can make you nervous as a freelancer. I've worked on 575 projects, and I've been screwed over maybe five times. When you think about it, every time you get burned, it just eats at you, it pisses you off, it makes you really angry, you just want to scream, but when you think about five out of five hundred and seventy five, most people out there are good. Most people are going to do the right thing. Most of them are too busy trying to make their own content and they want to do good work and they don't want to make a bad reputation for themselves, that they're gonna treat you right, or at least treat you appropriately. They're not gonna try to steal your work. But always, always, always work with a contract. I've learned that the hard way a couple of times. Work with a contract, all your terms speccd out, and if you're not comfortable reading contracts then reach out to a lawyer or legal person and get some input. Read up on it, there are sample contracts online. There's books. Aaron Marks, he's a friend of mine and was actually very kind to feature me in that. Looks, it's on it's third edition now and I believe there's a whole chapter on contracting. He provides sample contracts. You can also find contracts online. Legalese, contracts, the whole thing can be an uncomfortable topic, but you really need it. You really need to have the protection of the contract. You need to have the finality of "this is what I'm agreeing to. This is what I'm going to do, and this is what you're going to do in response." So I hope that's helpful to you. Again, not a lawyer, I don't play one on TV. I love to watch Law & Order, I love to scream "objection" randomly at home and at the workplace, but I'm not a lawyer, so if you need some actual advice how to reach out to someone who can get that to you much better than I can. Please like and subscribe. If you have questions or comments, or if you have topics you would like me to cover in future videos, hit me up! Reach out - I'd love to do that. Work with a contract people! Thanks!
  16. Well, in my journey (and completion) of learning C#, I've come upon a rather peculiar problem. I don't know if it has to do with having high-functioning autism, which I do, but I seem to struggle to remember anything related to this. If I see it and am given an example I can copy and reproduce results from a simple tutorial, I can do it usually without error (if not too complex). When I attempt to write my own script, my brain completely goes white. I can't remember or figure out how to use different parts of the C# language, and it's like attempting to read Chinese when I look through Unity's Scripting API and look for other tutorials for supplemental learning. I take notes, I pay full attention to the videos and interact along with them, and I do attempt solitary practice. I just can't seem to get anything to "stick" to the point where it makes sense outside of a learning example. I can't seem to apply what I'm learning in reality, and it's becoming a great problem. Does anyone have any advice for getting this stuff to stick? I've always been a visual learner and a hands-on learner, but with logical stuff that isn't within the realms of art has always been something I've had a hard time learning and remembering later on. I appreciate any advice you can give. Thank you. EDIT: Updated on 11/11/2018 because I've been sick and busy AF with stuff outside of coding. I have been making great headway thanks to the set of tutorials made by http://rbwhitaker.wikidot.com. I was recommended this tutor by the user Septopus, and good gods has he been helpful at breaking down the stuff I didn't understand. I've been following along with the beginning C# tutorials, and will move on to MonoGame ones when I am comfortable. I cannot thank you all enough for the support and encouragement you've given. Just another sign I should keep going with this. Take care!
  17. Hi! Is there by any chance you can give me an idea/concept that's different but related to the game Tower of London? (Is it called Tower of London?) Can you show me some reference images, games or videos related to the same? I've attached a reference image. Thanks!
  18. I have a project with a bunch of different .java files. Is there a way for me to organize them in eclipse while still allowing them to access each other? If I split the project in different folders, Eclipse can't find the different files when they're called in a different file.
  19. supermikhail

    A simple language game

    You click on objects in the world and get their name and how it's pronounced, in Russian which is my native language. That's pretty much it. Basically I want to be 100% sure that I can accomplish the project. The problem is, as a player, would I want to buy it? I myself am poor and consequently very selective with my entertainment spending. Which means, it'd be too lean an offering for me. On the other hand, I more or less believe that there are... enough "suckers" out there who'd pick up anything with "language learning" in description... To put it plainly. I guess that's the short of it. I don't know if that last intuition of mine is correct. And if it is, I don't actually want to scam people. But I don't want to promise something that I don't know that I'll be able to deliver, like... voice recognition or anything as useful and preposterous. Or even a story. I've never written for games. I've never designed a puzzle. All of which would probably add all the value necessary, but more likely just show me my limits. I suppose you could say "make a prototype". And I know I won't enjoy playing it, simply because, well, Russian is my native language and I like challenge. But I'd enjoy making it, and I like the idea of using videogames for studying languages. Any thoughts to help my conscience, more or less?
  20. Whilst a lot of people find programming to be a stimulating activity, for others, traditional programming can be very intimidating; needing to remember what seems like arcane symbology, and seemingly endless streams of specific keywords into an editor can be very off-putting. As many of us know, this actually gets easier with practice and soon becomes a less daunting task, but fortunately for those who struggle, there are other options available. Many modern game engines offer different types of visual interface with which you can set up an environment and characters, and input the logic required to turn those pieces into a functioning game. In this article, I aim to give a brief overview of some of the currently available options for creating games without traditional programming. This list will not be exhaustive, but instead, aim to cover a few of the more popular and capable options, and I will leave it as an exercise for the reader to further research those options and choose what may be most suitable for their own goals. Features and prices listed are current at the time of writing in October 2018. Many of the options presented offer free trials, which I would encourage you to try out before spending your hard earned money -- in the case that no trial is available I would suggest checking out some written and video tutorials of the software to see if it looks like something you could understand and work with, as well as some games made with the software to see if it may be able to create the types of games you have in mind. The first option I'm going to introduce is a simpler one suitable for introducing programming to younger would-be developers and is more limited in its capabilities, so if you're interested in more complex options please don't be put off and keep scrolling to the following items. Below the list of options you'll find a few thoughts on visual systems. Scratch Scratch is a freely available programming environment created by the Lifelong Kindergarten Group at MIT Media Lab, and allows you to create games, interactive stories, and animations. There is also an active online community of people sharing their creations and giving positive feedback. Programming in Scratch is done by snapping building blocks together to input your logic, and although it's usable by people of all ages and abilities it's specially designed for younger learners ages 8 to 16. Scratch works right in the web browser via the Flash plugin, so there are also no large downloads. If you prefer working offline, there is also a downloadable version available. Honestly, you're not going to create a smash hit video game with Scratch, but it's the perfect introduction for a child with an interest and may be a valuable starting point for people who find other systems intimidating. Working with the visual system in scratch will encourage logical, structured thinking that can be applied to more complex systems or even to traditional programming at a later stage, and although it's fairly basic children will be excited to see and play with their own creations. You can view (and play with!) some projects created with Scratch in the Explore section of their community. Note that while you can share and play your creations with the Scratch community, but won't be able to deploy to other platforms such as mobile, consoles, etc. Game Maker Game Maker is a popular option amongst hobbyist and indie developers and is able to create games for a wide variety of platforms including mobile and many of the consoles. The engine has only rudimentary 3d capabilities and is not intended for making 3d games, but is very capable when it comes to 2d. A number of very successful games including Hyper Light Drifter, Hotline Miami, Risk of Rain, Nuclear Throne and more have been created with Game Maker. Check out the Game Maker Showcase for examples of what the engine is capable of. Developers can use a simplified programming language called GML (Game Maker Language), or with a visual "drag and drop" system, and almost anything that can be done with GML can also be done with drag and drop -- albeit sometimes it might be a bit more clunky. As a popular engine, you'll find plenty of tutorials (including lengthy series of officially provided video tutorials), sample projects, and people willing to help with learning and creating your projects. You can get started with an unlimited free trial, and publish to additional platforms with a yearly subscription starting from US$39/year for Windows, up to US$1500/year for all available platforms. Construct Construct is a browser-based game engine that allows you to create games with a visual editor - in fact, in this case, programming is not even an option. Games are created by applying and configuring "behaviours", and by using a visual "event sheet" that runs commands in order, and you are able to create most types of 2d game. Because the editor runs in a browser you can create your game from any platform with a suitable browser, including mobile -- although you'll find it awkward to work with on a smaller screen. A downloadable version is also available, and many functions of the editor are able to work offline. Note that Construct is strictly a HTML5 engine, so exports for other platforms are provided via wrappers -- essentially packing your game up with a cut-down web browser to create an executable for the platform in question. Their is an active community using the software, and plenty of tutorials and examples available to help you get started. A free trial is available with some limitations, with full features available via subscription starting at US$99/year for a personal license or US$149/year for a business license (which you'll probably want if you're planning to monetize). Stencyl Stencyl is another visual editor aimed at creating 2d games, and able to publish to a range of platforms. Stencyl's editor uses logic blocks similar to those available in Scratch, but also allows more advanced users to write some code if they wish to do so. You can view some games created with Stencyl is the showcase. Stencyl seems to have a slightly less active community than some other options, but there is some help available, and plenty of tutorials. Some of the tutorials seem to be for previous versions of the software. Unity + PlayMaker Unity is an incredibly popular and very capable engine that can be used to create great games. By itself, Unity doesn't provide visual scripting capabilities (programming is done with the C# programming language), but a third party add-on called PlayMaker comes to the rescue by adding a visual system and allowing developers to create games without writing code. PlayMaker will currently set you back US$45.50 (or cheaper with a Unity Plus or Pro subscription). PlayMaker games are created with a flow-based system that involves toggling settings on nodes, which you connect in different orders to achieve the desired behaviour. You will find PlayMaker more limiting than programming Unity with C#, but the experience you gain with the visual system may encourage you to try to C# and give you some fundamental logical thinking skills to build upon. Unreal BluePrints Unreal is another popular engine used by professional developers. In this case, a visual system is built into the engine in the form of Blueprints, intended to allow non-coding designers to work with the engine and create interactive content. You can get started using Unreal with no upfront cost, and pay just 5% of your game's earnings once you surpass a certain threshold. Like many of the other options, there is an active community using Unreal, and plenty of tutorial content available, although most users do the majority of their Unreal development via C++ programming, with Blueprints used by non-coding team members. Are There Limitations? Honestly, yes. Just as those using an engine might find themselves more limited than those developing their game "from scratch", you will often find that visual systems are more limited than traditional development. Some things may be difficult or more time-consuming to implement in a visual editor, or if the creator hasn't exposed some data or a function you need your idea may be impossible. However, many find these options to be more approachable, and some very impressive and successful games have been created using them. Just be sure to do your due diligence about any limitations you might face before spending money hoping to create your dream game. Other Options The above are just a few of the popular options that can allow you to create games without traditional programming, but there are other options available if you're willing to do some further research. Some others you might wish to look in to include GameSalad, RPG Maker, Unity + uScript Professional, Buildbox (,I found this editor to be especially limiting), and more. Why Do I Keep Calling It "Traditional Programming"? You may have noticed I keep saying "traditional programming" rather than just "programming". Some people don't consider visual systems like those provided by the engines above to be programming, but I would disagree. Wikipedia describes programming as: and goes on to say: I would argue that you are still doing the same task with a visual system, just via a different input method where you join blocks (or whatever the system in question provides) rather than typing special keywords. Although some people find this type of visual programming less intimidating and easier to understand, you'll find that you're developing the same skills of logical thinking, planning out solutions, and finding (hopefully elegant) solutions. After some time with visual systems, you may find the concepts used in traditional programming more familiar and approachable. Conclusion There are numerous options available to create games without traditional programming, and with the right selection you can likely find something capable of the type of games you wish to create. Remember to research your options carefully, and don't be bothered by those who try to tell you it isn't "real game development". I hope the above list helps to get you started with finding a suitable option for your project.
  21. I'm making an small 2D engine using Kha and I have a timer class, which basically simply either waits a certain amount of time to call a function, or repeatedly calls a certain function after every x seconds. I simply want to know if I should have timers run on different threads. I'm aware that makes sense, but I might use many timers in a game for example, would that still be okay? Also I'm currently writing an animation components, which waits every x seconds to draw another image using the timer class. And in a normal 2D games, I would have many objects with animations on them, other than the other timers. So I just wanted to ask people who have more experience and knowledge than I have what I should do for timers: Either leave them on the same main thread, or make them run on different threads. Thanks in advance.
  22. I've reached a turning point in my server application(s) building phase where it's becoming a more than reasonable idea to centralize some of the non-persistent data in my system(e.g. player positions, multiple systems need some access to recent positional data). I presently have 6 individual server applications that interact with the game client to some extent and interact with each other to some extent. The complexities of managing the data flow(s) on a peer to peer basis are quickly becoming a hindrance to forward momentum. Additionally my present design doesn't scale, well at all. I'm presently using key-value data types almost exclusively within the server code itself, to store the data that I need to centralize. And I need NO persistence, there's no need for a database or file system behind the in-memory KV database. All persistent data is handled by the server code directly. For scalability it should be able to replicate/synchronize the data across the internet if need be. So that leads me to a couple of choices and my question. Which one? Nearly ALL the feature comparisons I can find are published by Alachisoft, and thusly are biased against Redis, and a few years old from the look of them. As well as not being particularly detracting from Redis as a candidate for my use case. I'm looking at 3 options: Ncache http://www.alachisoft.com/ncache/ Redis https://redis.io/ HomeBrew... Some of the code I've already got + a good replication algorithm and I'm set.. hahaha Not listed as #1 for a reason. I'm just not sure I want to add an 8th piece of code to my present development load. Does anybody out there have experience with either or preferably both of these cache/db servers? Presently I'm leaning towards NCache simply because it matches my present server development and my most likely initial server release environment of Windows/.Net/etc... But I really like everything I've read on Redis as well, and I've engineered Linux servers for as many years as Windows.... And my eventual scale-up platform will likely be Linux.. So, there's most of the variables I'm considering. I'm really mostly interested in anybody's practical experience with these two or any others in their immediate ball-park, I think Apache Ignite is feature similar with the above two... Also interested in any non-biased 3rd party comparisons that I'm presently unable to find, if you have any quick links handy. Thanks for reading!
  23. What follows are some really UGLY mock-ups, so please don't worry about critiquing the visual design. I'm designing the economic system for my game and I've mocked up what I think are the required minimum features/etc. that will be needed to string it all together. I'm wondering if I've forgotten anything that will prevent the system from working. The Goal is a straight forward minimalist Auction, Stock Market, and Banking System that my game will use to control the flow of 92 elemental resources and the ###s of Items that they will be able to construct from them. The following image constitutes the feature set of the main menu of the Trading Screen. On the upper left are the Order Filter options. On the lower left are the Create New Order Options. Imagine something like an interactive periodic table here instead of this crudeness. Once a filter is chosen or after clicking on an Element: The Orders view... There will be all the necessary trending indicators and maybe even graphs and whatnot too so, don't worry about that. Am I missing anything that I would need to account for on the data side and display for the user, to have a functional Stock Trade interface? Auctions: Just a simplistic timed auction system, anything I forgot here? When you click on a specific item it will take you to a more detailed page for that auction, nothing special. Two different base item types, elements(resources) and Items(game items). Banking: Clicking on a transaction history item will take you to a detail page with ... details. I'm sure I missed something silly, or critical... Been staring at it for too many hours now. Help! Thanks in advance! EDIT: Create Auction options, view/edit/etc.. those will be in there too.
  24. Cacks

    Angular Friction

    Hi, how do I calculate angular friction between my polyhedra? I have contact points My engine doesn't incorporate angular friction so spinning objects don't move linearly if they spin on surfaces & angular momentum doesn't decrease, cheers
  25. As some of you know I'm doing procedural planet generation. My algorithm needs a very rough size for the highest resolution terrain voxels. It bases LOD calculations on that value. For flat terrain the size of a mesh triangle (which will be roughly equilateral) will be equal to the voxel size. What I'm wondering is what's a good size for the edge of such a triangle. I was thinking maybe 25 cm. To clarify this would be the size of a triangle under the feet of a standing character. I guess what I'm asking is what is the range of values for triangles in terrain meshes used in games these days. I know it will vary, but I'm trying to get a ball park figure for say a theoretical average 3D game.
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