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Found 6 results

  1. Hello, month ago I had released my 3rd Android/WebGL game, it’s a simple Clicker. I wanted to experiment with clicking mechanic, add some RPG elements. I didn’t know if I should release statistics from this game (they are really small). But in past I had said, that I will release statistics from my all games, so here is it: „Stickman RPG - Idle Money Clicker” has been downloaded by 166 people, WebGL version got 2400 plays. 78 Downloads come from Google Play, 88 come from Amazon Store. It might look strange, because, there are more downloads from Amazon Store, than from Google Play. It’s because my game was removed from Google Play (because „it’s look like another game”). I had written to Google Play (My game was not in Google Play, for 2-3 days), and they had brought back my game to Google Play, they just removed my game by mistake ;p Kongregate Data: Earnings: $3.70 Kongregate $0.03 ChartBoost $0 Unity Ads Yeah, I was ready for no earnings from my game, I had made 3 games, and I had earned total $0, it’s not problem. I know, that I need improve my skills to earn something, my games are just too weak to earn cash. I’m 19 year old, I just like making games, I think it’s pretty fun. From a fun fact, 9 September an area button was clicked ~9000x (counting only online players, counting all clicks, not only unique). And 14000x Start Shield button was clicked (not counting shield button, just Start Shield button, not only unique, only online players). 9 September players had spent in my game 505k seconds, in my last game (record) was 3.38 Million seconds at 13 August. Some Statistics about my game: At this moment I work on a next game, it will be a space shooter, we will fly from planet to planet, unlock/upgrade new ships, beat new enemies. Game will get own story: „I got normal life like other humans, but one day all has changed. I had decided, that I want leave my safe and peace planet, and have a trip over galaxy, I want to have adventure of my life. Death, life, brutality, continuous fighting, welcome to space travel, even if you survive, yes ... Nothing will be the same, here life is next to death, friend next to the enemy, anyway, today is difficult to distinguish.” Google Play Amazon Store Kongregate Web Version Facebook Twitter My Other Games Some ScreenShots from game:
  2. Material Design in Games?

    Hi everyone, first of all a little sorry, this is not about "visual arts" but more a GUI topic. I didn't know where else to put it, though. So, I just wondered if anyone of you has any experience or even real data on Google's material design in games? What are the pros and cons? Would players accept it? And can you make material design feel more "gamey"? Thanks in advance, BG
  3. I was reworking on my LightProbe filter, and I wrote some code to generate the Reference Cubemap, but then I noticed some discontinuous on the border of each face.(Top:CPU implementaion, Bottom: GPU implementation, the contrast has been adjusted on the right side) At first I think it maybe caused by the interpolation, but then I tried the same algorithm in 2D (like a slice in the normal light probe prefiltering) for better visualization, and the result really confused me. See the attachments, the top half is the Prefiltered Color value, displayed per channel, it's upside down because I used the ColorValue directly as the y coordinate. The bottom half is the differential of the color, it's very clearly there is a discontinuous, and the position is where the border should be. And as the roughness goes higher, the plot gets stranger . So, I am kinda of stuck in here, what's happening and what to do to remove this artifact? Anybody have any idea? and here is my code inline FVector2D Map(int32 FaceIndex, int32 i, int32 FaceSize, float& SolidAngle) { float u = 2 * (i + 0.5) / (float)FaceSize - 1; FVector2D Return; switch (FaceIndex) { case 0: Return = FVector2D(-u, -1); break; case 1: Return = FVector2D(-1, u); break; case 2: Return = FVector2D(u, 1); break; case 3: Return = FVector2D(1, -u); break; } SolidAngle = 1.0f / FMath::Pow(Return.SizeSquared(), 3.0f / 2.0f); return Return.SafeNormal(); } void Test2D() { const int32 Res = 256; const int32 MipLevel = 8; TArray<FLinearColor> Source; TArray<FLinearColor> Prefiltered; Source.AddZeroed(Res * 4); Prefiltered.AddZeroed(Res * 4); for (int32 i = 0; i < Res; ++i) { Source[i] = FLinearColor(1, 0, 0); Source[Res + i] = FLinearColor(0, 1, 0); Source[Res * 2 + i] = FLinearColor(0, 0, 1); Source[Res * 3 + i] = FLinearColor(0, 0, 0); } const float Roughness = MipLevel / 8.0f; const float a = Roughness * Roughness; const float a2 = a * a; // Brute force sampling with GGX kernel for (int32 FaceIndex = 0; FaceIndex < 4; ++FaceIndex) { for (int32 i = 0; i < Res; ++i) { float SolidAngle = 0; FVector2D N = Map(FaceIndex, i, Res, SolidAngle); double TotalColor[3] = {}; double TotalWeight = 0; for (int32 SampleFace = 0; SampleFace < 4; ++SampleFace) { for (int32 j = 0; j < Res; ++j) { float SampleJacobian = 0; FVector2D L = Map(SampleFace, j, Res, SampleJacobian); const float NoL = (L | N); if (NoL <= 0) continue; const FVector2D H = (N + L).SafeNormal(); const float NoH = (N | H); float D = a2 * NoL * SampleJacobian / FMath::Pow(NoH*NoH * (a2 - 1) + 1, 2.0f) ; TotalWeight += D; FLinearColor Sample = Source[SampleFace * Res + j] * D; TotalColor[0] += Sample.R; TotalColor[1] += Sample.G; TotalColor[2] += Sample.B; } } if (TotalWeight > 0) { Prefiltered[FaceIndex * Res + i] = FLinearColor( TotalColor[0] / TotalWeight, TotalColor[1] / TotalWeight, TotalColor[2] / TotalWeight); } } } // Save to bmp const int32 Width = 4 * Res; const int32 Height = 768; TArray<FColor> Bitmap; Bitmap.SetNum(Width * Height); // Prefiltered Color curve per channel float MaxDelta = 0; for (int32 x = 0; x < Width; ++x) { FColor SourceColor = Source[x].ToFColor(false); Bitmap[x] = SourceColor; FColor Sample = Prefiltered[x].ToFColor(false); check(Sample.R < 256); check(Sample.G < 256); check(Sample.B < 256); Bitmap[Sample.R * Width + x] = FColor(255, 0, 0); Bitmap[Sample.G * Width + x] = FColor(0, 255, 0); Bitmap[Sample.B * Width + x] = FColor(0, 0, 255); if (x > 0) { const FLinearColor Delta = Prefiltered[x] - Prefiltered[x - 1]; MaxDelta = FMath::Max(MaxDelta, FMath::Max3(FMath::Abs(Delta.R), FMath::Abs(Delta.G), FMath::Abs(Delta.B))); } } // Differential per channel const float Scale = 128 / MaxDelta; for (int32 x = 1; x < Width; ++x) { const FLinearColor Delta = Prefiltered[x] - Prefiltered[x - 1]; Bitmap[int32(512 + Delta.R * Scale) * Width + x] = FColor(255, 0, 0); Bitmap[int32(512 + Delta.G * Scale) * Width + x] = FColor(0, 255, 0); Bitmap[int32(512 + Delta.B * Scale) * Width + x] = FColor(0, 0, 255); } FFileHelper::CreateBitmap(TEXT("Test"), Width, Height, Bitmap.GetData()); } Roughness 0.5.bmp Roughness 1.bmp
  4. Nearly 5,000 developers and tech professionals across the world responded to Packt’s third annual Skill Up survey to share their thoughts on the latest tech tools and trends, and how they work and learn. Skill Up 2017 also investigated wider questions about the tech industry - from its status and value in organizations and industry today, through to urgent issues around diversity. The aim of Packt’s Skill Up survey is to help those working in tech make better decisions about the tools they decide to use, how they use them, and how they learn about them, in order to stay relevant and gain a competitive edge in their careers. Download the full Skill Up report to discover what it’s like to work in tech today. Who took part in Skill Up 2017? Skill Up was circulated globally to people working across an array of sectors in tech; from mobile developers to big data engineers, and everyone in between. 4,731 respondents from 43 countries around the world took part. The majority of responses came from men aged between 35 and 45 working full-time in software solutions in the United States. A full breakdown of this year’s demographics can be found in the full Skill Up report. Skill Up at a glance And the number one tool is… Python. Its popularity has surged over recent years and it has clearly gained huge mainstream uptake due to its accessibility, fully featured standard library, rich ecosystem of libraries and frameworks, and highly engaged community. Joining Python in the top 5 are Git, Visual Studio, Eclipse, and Java. Discover who’s using Python and the tools they’re most likely to use with it in Skill Up. What should people be learning next? Python’s popularity won’t be waning any time soon – it came in at second place as the tool to learn over the next 12 months. Python was pipped to pole position by Docker. With the growth of containerization, a surge in people learning Docker makes sense. Angular, Visual Studio, and Jenkins also make the top 5. Take a look at Skill Up to explore who will be learning what over the next 12 months. Why learn something new? ‘There is a problem that I need to fix and don't know how’ is the number one reason why developers and tech professionals choose to learn something new. They also cite solving problems more effectively at work, and curiosity about tools and languages they’ve read about online as reasons to get learning. 18-34 year olds are most likely to learn something new in order to expand their skillset and apply for a new role. Despite this career focus, they are the most likely to say they are not motivated to learn. The over 45s are very practical about their learning, saying that a new update or change to a language or tool they work with spurs them on to learn. Whilst they have the motivation to learn, they find that lack of time is their biggest barrier. Skill Up also revealed that 18-34 year olds are big Stack Overflow fans, whilst the over 45s are into their reading. Packt is committed to learning to suit everyone; offering eBooks, print books, videos, blogs, and an online learning platform, Mapt. Discover more about how those working in tech are learning in the full Skill Up report. The skills that pay the bills The big question – who’s earning the most? The top five roles to be in for ultimate earning power are C-Suite Level Managers, Big Data Engineers, Mid-level Leads/Managers, Security Engineers, and Information Architects. Unsurprisingly, developers and tech professionals in North America have the highest average salary, whilst those in South and South-East Asia are worst off. As for the lowest paid roles, hobbyists came out on top, yet we can assume respondents identifying as hobbyists do not work full-time in a tech role. In terms of full-time professions, Game Developers had the lowest average salary, followed by Web Developers, Technical Support Professionals, and Mobile Developers. So what do you need to learn to earn? Respondents with Splunk, Hadoop, Kafka, Chef, or SAS under their belt earn more than the average salary. It seems as though Big Data is the industry to be in. Does the tech industry have a gender diversity problem? 90% of respondents to Skill Up were male, which in itself reveals the industry’s lack of gender diversity. Packt asked respondents if they thought the tech industry does have a gender diversity issue, and a majority of 47.2% agreed. 24.3% didn’t think there was an issue, whilst 28.5% were sat on the fence. The biggest gap between gender equality appeared in the Financial Services and Software Solutions sectors, whilst Design and Marketing came out on top for diversity. It may come as no surprise that 18-24 year old males were the least likely to agree there is a gender diversity issue. Perhaps a rose-tinted view stemming from a lack of industry experience? The full Skill Up 2017 survey report is free and available for download here.
  5. Nearly 5,000 developers and tech professionals across the world responded to Packt’s third annual Skill Up survey to share their thoughts on the latest tech tools and trends, and how they work and learn. Skill Up 2017 also investigated wider questions about the tech industry - from its status and value in organizations and industry today, through to urgent issues around diversity. The aim of Packt’s Skill Up survey is to help those working in tech make better decisions about the tools they decide to use, how they use them, and how they learn about them, in order to stay relevant and gain a competitive edge in their careers. Download the full Skill Up report to discover what it’s like to work in tech today. Who took part in Skill Up 2017? Skill Up was circulated globally to people working across an array of sectors in tech; from mobile developers to big data engineers, and everyone in between. 4,731 respondents from 43 countries around the world took part. The majority of responses came from men aged between 35 and 45 working full-time in software solutions in the United States. A full breakdown of this year’s demographics can be found in the full Skill Up report. Skill Up at a glance And the number one tool is… Python. Its popularity has surged over recent years and it has clearly gained huge mainstream uptake due to its accessibility, fully featured standard library, rich ecosystem of libraries and frameworks, and highly engaged community. Joining Python in the top 5 are Git, Visual Studio, Eclipse, and Java. Discover who’s using Python and the tools they’re most likely to use with it in Skill Up. What should people be learning next? Python’s popularity won’t be waning any time soon – it came in at second place as the tool to learn over the next 12 months. Python was pipped to pole position by Docker. With the growth of containerization, a surge in people learning Docker makes sense. Angular, Visual Studio, and Jenkins also make the top 5. Take a look at Skill Up to explore who will be learning what over the next 12 months. Why learn something new? ‘There is a problem that I need to fix and don't know how’ is the number one reason why developers and tech professionals choose to learn something new. They also cite solving problems more effectively at work, and curiosity about tools and languages they’ve read about online as reasons to get learning. 18-34 year olds are most likely to learn something new in order to expand their skillset and apply for a new role. Despite this career focus, they are the most likely to say they are not motivated to learn. The over 45s are very practical about their learning, saying that a new update or change to a language or tool they work with spurs them on to learn. Whilst they have the motivation to learn, they find that lack of time is their biggest barrier. Skill Up also revealed that 18-34 year olds are big Stack Overflow fans, whilst the over 45s are into their reading. Packt is committed to learning to suit everyone; offering eBooks, print books, videos, blogs, and an online learning platform, Mapt. Discover more about how those working in tech are learning in the full Skill Up report. The skills that pay the bills The big question – who’s earning the most? The top five roles to be in for ultimate earning power are C-Suite Level Managers, Big Data Engineers, Mid-level Leads/Managers, Security Engineers, and Information Architects. Unsurprisingly, developers and tech professionals in North America have the highest average salary, whilst those in South and South-East Asia are worst off. As for the lowest paid roles, hobbyists came out on top, yet we can assume respondents identifying as hobbyists do not work full-time in a tech role. In terms of full-time professions, Game Developers had the lowest average salary, followed by Web Developers, Technical Support Professionals, and Mobile Developers. So what do you need to learn to earn? Respondents with Splunk, Hadoop, Kafka, Chef, or SAS under their belt earn more than the average salary. It seems as though Big Data is the industry to be in. Does the tech industry have a gender diversity problem? 90% of respondents to Skill Up were male, which in itself reveals the industry’s lack of gender diversity. Packt asked respondents if they thought the tech industry does have a gender diversity issue, and a majority of 47.2% agreed. 24.3% didn’t think there was an issue, whilst 28.5% were sat on the fence. The biggest gap between gender equality appeared in the Financial Services and Software Solutions sectors, whilst Design and Marketing came out on top for diversity. It may come as no surprise that 18-24 year old males were the least likely to agree there is a gender diversity issue. Perhaps a rose-tinted view stemming from a lack of industry experience? The full Skill Up 2017 survey report is free and available for download here. View full story
  6. Hey everyone, I’m currently working on my bachelor thesis titled „Balancing Resource Management in First-Person Survival Games – A case study of Dark Side of the Moon”. Dark Side of the Moon is a Sci-Fi Survival Game hat my team and I produced at university last semester. My roles were lead artist/art director & Game Design. My bachelor thesis is based on the analytical and psychological aspects of balancing and the flow theory. I’m looking for anyone who has designed survival games so far or created spreadsheets for e.g. food item count & hunger curve balancing. I’d be grateful for any replies, Best, Marlis