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Found 126 results

  1. I am having difficulties trying to understand how a fragment shader (GLSL) works in OpenGL. To be more specific, how does OpenGL reads the color/texture data? In the vertex Shader (GLSL) there is a pre-defined variable that sets the vertex data called gl_Position. So basically I am asking, what is the variable/method that sends color/texture data to the OpenGL program in the fragment shader or do i just type out vec4 fragColor; does that work? (above code)
  2. Hello guys! (It's my first post here yay) So I'm working on a game recreation. Essentially I am porting over original environments/levels from an older game (TrackMania United Forever - 2008) to the latest game (ManiaPlanet). Both games are using the same engine, called GameBox. The newer game obviously has a more up-to-date version of the engine and thus more possibilities graphically. Anyway, I'm here with a kinda technical question. The rallye environment of the old game has a special technique to simulate grass. You can't find particles or generated grass meshes (only a few almost invisible layers of fake grass textures to make it look good from the bottom, but it doesn't matter). The green base texture still gives a similar effect. Once you zoom in, you notice that the texture has a really weird effect. To not write too much, here's a video demonstrating what I mean: https://streamable.com/u48mj So I want to reproduce exactly this (or a similar) effect in the new game. As I said, the engine is the same. Texturing in the new game works like this: _D.dds (DXT1) - Diffuse; _N.dds (DC3) - Normalmap; _S.dds - Specular (DXT5) texture with grayscales. I am only given the diffuse green texture (DXT1), called "GrassHH1Diff" and a 2nd texture called "GrassH01Height", which looks like a normal map using deep blue. I tried using these two textures in the new game together but obviously the effect does not exist there. Now I'm trying to achieve a similar "plastic" effect using the 3 possible textures (D, N, S), but I have no idea where to start from. Can I even reproduce it or is it more like a game based shader? No idea. Maybe you can help me. All I know is that a normalmap can have a lot of different effects if you experiment with the color channels. Maybe this is where I could start from. Thanks for your time! I'm looking forward to hearing from you. Flo
  3. Hello and welcome to this weeks Dev Diary! Today I have a short update for several findings on how developers and landscape artists can approach terrain creation. As many of you know, procedural terrain creation has been the thing for a while now and it's no surprise to find several tutorials or showcases for that, even when you are not looking for information on procedural terrain generation. Here is couple of Unity tutorials for that; Complete Guide to Procedural Level Generation in Unity – Part 1 PROCEDURAL TERRAIN in Unity! - Mesh Generation (YouTube Video) As mentioned last week though, I needed to find information about methods of making huge maps, which might most likely require slicing up the terrain meshes into several pieces, before joining them together. Luckily, I found these four examples, of which one of them is an actual tutorial, while two others are short showcases of rendering techniques by EA and one is a blog post about heightmap optimization in short and quick analyse about different methods of handling procedural texture placement using a "Splatmap"; Frostbite Rendering Architecture and Real-time Procedural Shading & Texturing Techniques (GDC 2007) Terrain in Battlefield 3: A Modern, Complete and Scalable System TERRAIN RENDERING IN GAMES – BASICS A Guide to Handling Huge Worlds in Unity – Part 1 Thus far, I haven't found time to try these out yet, but that is my agenda for this week. Thank you for tuning in, and I'll see you on the next one! You can check out every possible mid week announcements about the project on these official channels; • YouTube • Facebook • Twitter • Discord • Reddit • Pinterest • SoundCloud • LinkedIn •
  4. I see the playing field populating and players taking their turns... Special thanks for this particular challenge opportunity. Full disclosure, I've actually never played Doom. Which made this first week a research exercise. Sorry JohnC and crew, but wow...I'm put back in anticipation of what may be to come from the quantity of declared participants. So tally-ho, everyone in on the ride. I'm going the raycaster route to stay more in key, with an old wolfenstein clone framework from an early gameinstitute.com, Perlin Noise and AI Seminar offerings by Author : JohnDeGoes(12-15 years ago). One of the graphics items Doom brought to the table were textures on the ceiling and floor. A concept my chosen framework is unaware. This go, I'd like to do a proper AI agent type or two. Also on the todo list is a simple sprite animation atlas tool that is feed from targeted screen grab so I can render the art instead of doing pixel art or photo persuasion, but mostly hand packing image sequences is such a chore. I'd like to open this project up to others. Right now I'm thinking heavy guitar loops for game play. It would be nice to have a sound guy of the programmer persuasion and an ai guy. Lets talk. ...but after kicking the can for more than a while, the flame piddled out. I've had this project collecting dust for a decade and thought it would be a good idea to start from wolfenstein to transition to doom. Then I was umm...whatever, I've done enough 2D...moving onward. Here I'm showing the abandoning and rebirth starting with a nice modular wall asset gem from the unity store and a first stab at some licks. Makes me happy.
  5. I've implemented a basic version of Voxel Cone Tracing that uses a single volume texture (covering a small region around the player). But I want to have large and open environments, so I must use some cascaded (LoD'ed) variant of the algorithm. 1) How to inject sky light into the voxels and how to do it fast? (e.g. imagine a large shadowed area which is lit by the blue sky above.) I think, after voxelizing the scene I will introduce an additional compute shader pass where, from each surface voxel, I will trace cones in the direction of the surface normal until they hit the sky (cubemap), but, I'm afraid, it would be slow with Cascaded Voxel Cone Tracing. 2) How to calculate (rough) reflections from the sky (and distant objects)? If the scene consists of many "reflective" pixels, tracing cones through all cascades would destroy performance. Looks like Voxel Cone Tracing is only suited for smallish indoor scenes (like Doom 3-style cramped spaces).
  6. What do we do inside a dungeon? Hi everybody. Again, it's been a long time, but now the summer is finally over and I can show you some updates to the game. After completing the collision-handling code overhaul and while filling the lower dungeon section with life, I literally wondered what the player should do inside the dungeon -- besides walking around and killing monsters. For the upper dungeon part, it was okay to use find-the-right-key tasks. For the lower part, however, I wanted a little more RPG-like mechanics, so I added two non-monster NPCs in order to deepen the story (albeit a rather weak story). Together with the story elements, there is a puzzle that can be solved in order to gain a bonus on the sword. The puzzle consists of a couple of stones that have to be placed in the correct order (see the screenshot blow): An appropriate ending The dungeon crawler challenge version of the game ended rather abrupt. In order to give the game an appropriate ending, I felt that there should be an end boss. In a raycasting engine, there is a natural size limit for sprites (since the ceiling and floor heights are fixed here, and also because the sprites rotate with the camera). In order to create a boss that is adequately daunting, I decided to create a lindworm / a dragon-like snake that is assembled from multiple sprites. It moves very similar to the snake in the original snake-game. The screenshots below show a first impression. I also made a short video of the movement of the lindworm (see below). Ready for Beta-Testing? The puzzle and the boss-fight are not yet finished, but they are the last two features I will implement for this game. When those two tasks are done, I will start a short beta testing phase in order to collect player feedback and bringing this game towards a release. Thank you for reading, Carsten
  7. ongamex92

    Game engine devlog new video

    Hi all, here is a new video about the engine and the game that I work on in my free time after work. This time I hope nothing happens to the frame rate of the video...
  8. Hello and welcome to this weeks Dev Diary! It has been a sincerely exhausting week, as learning the ropes with Blender has been all but convenient. And here is why; Yet Some More Simple Lessons I started of with some beginner tutorials for how to make landscapes from heightmaps. I followed the said tutorials to the letter, but for some reason the shortcuts did not work, even when I did exactly, as the guy in the video, even re-watched from three to six times, to see every possible little detail that I might have missed. Well, it turned out, that the so called Beginner tutorials did require foreknowledge about the workings of Blender, as some skipped on what shortcuts to press in some stages and some outright cut off part of the video, where the method of selecting was not revealed. Only at fifth tutorial video, where the person in question used visual keyboard and had not cut content from the video, explaining simple way to make real 3D image from maps from start to finish. The little basic thing that all the other videos I watched had missed, was to press TAB in the Layout Workspace, which turn it into "Edit Mode", and only then you can select faces of the object. The intuitive way of unwrapping the object would be a simple one click in the object mode, which would select the object "in the right way" for the "U" shotcut to work. Or better yet, unwrap could be part of the right click menu, as it might be one of the most used functions in Blender. Lesson of this is; always try to find tutorials on the user interface of the more complicated software, no matter how frustrating it might be. My impression from the hype behind the Blender 2.8 was that it should be even more intuitive than before, but apparently, it's still nowhere near intuitive enough to start using without more careful study of the basics - unlike with SketchUp. The Alternative In the end, I didn't manage to make a working 3D terrain with Blender, even after working several hours with it, until late yesterday, when I had limited success, but nothing to show just yet, due to blender crashing with trying to subdivide the plane mesh to 60 and subdividing another 60 after adding the heightmap, so that the details would come out more. But to prove a point publicly, I started googling for SketchUp plugins - and today I found what I needed. A Simple tool called "Bitmap to Mesh", which turns any bitmap (or png) heightmaps to workable meshes. Here is the heightmap, while it is processing; And here is the ready mesh; No extensive tutorials, only 6 steps; Draw > Mesh From Heightmap Context Menu > Mesh From Heightmap Context Menu > Mesh From Bitmap Choose the Start Plane Choose the Width Choose the Depth And after processing, you have a rudimentary heightmap, ready for you to tinker with to make it look more terrain like. The above picture is just a test of this work process and does not represent the end product of my tutorial journey. As you can see, the workflow was effortless and extremely beginner friendly, yet powerful enough so that even professionals can start their miracle working with ease. I would also like to press a point here; I found this plugin today and before writing this Dev Diary, managed to get done what I needed in less than a hour, with nothing but a simple few lines of written tutorial. Blender isn't a bad software, but has a much steeper learning curve and needs a much more thorough study of tutorials and getting used to before you can use it effectively. Yet it is a very powerful tool for developers of all kind, like a swiss army knife for a camper - a tool for quite much any job an artist or game developer could need, if they know or learn how to use it. Also to be fare to Blender, it is a humongous task to make something so versatile to be as intuitive as possible. 2.8 is a huge step in the right direction, in my opinion. Conclusion I'm going to continue with my attempts to create a 3D world map for the RTS game - yes, I just can't shake that desire for a 3D game, even after saying that it would make more sense to do 2D first and touting that I would try to do a 2D (or 2.5D) game as my first release project. As much as I have dear memories from retro games, like the original Command and Conquer, Dune and the original Warcraft series, and even to some extent KKND (Krush Kill n' Destroy), I don't feel inspired by the thought of making a 2D RTS game in this day and era. Following the rationale of making a 2D game despite not feeling inspired by it doesn't seem right to me, as I wan't my first game to become something as enjoyable and easy to approach as a first game can be. I'm not expecting a masterpiece, but it would be nice to set the bar high enough for the game, so something bigger can come out of it at some point. Some developers are more comfortable with quantity of playable games they make, as it is easy to demand too much from the quality aspect, because many artists are more or less perfectionists. But I feel the most inspired by the idea of building a simple foundation for something much larger. Something that evolves through time and effort, yet offers something to do for the gamers and project funders from an early build. RTS as a genre would be perfect for this, as it has very simple foundations, but like other Real-Time -genres, can also branch out in near limitless ways. As a genre it does not appeal to as many people, as Action games do, but I will try to find a way to make something that feels unique. Thank you for tuning in, and I'll see you on the next one! You can check out every possible mid week announcements about the project on these official channels; • YouTube • Facebook • Twitter • Discord • Reddit • Pinterest • SoundCloud • LinkedIn •
  9. It's been two months now since I started to do daily game development streams. I've been trying my best, but it is time for this to come to a close. In this article I'll talk about the various things that happened, why I'm stopping, and the future of the Leaf game. Strap in! It's actually been slightly longer than two months, but since I missed some days due to being sick, and some others because I didn't feel like streaming – more on that later – I'll just count it as two months. In any case, in this time I've done 56 streams, almost all of them two hours long. That's a lot of hours, and I'm truly impressed that some people stuck around for almost all of them. Thank you very much! A lot happened in that time too, and I think it would be interesting to go over some of the major features and talk about them briefly. New Features in Leaf Slopes and Collision Collision detection was heavily revised from the previous version. The general procedure is to scan the current chunk for hits until there are no more hits to be found. If we have more than ten hits we assume that the player is in a wall somehow and just die. The number ten is obviously arbitrary, but somehow it seems sufficient and I haven't had any accidental deaths yet. When a hit is detected, it dispatches on the type of tile or entity that was collided with. It does so in two steps, the first is a test whether the collision will happen at all, to allow sub-tile precision, and the second is the actual collision resolution, should a full hit have been detected. The first test can be used to elide collisions with jump-through platforms or slopes if the player moves above the actual slope surface. The actual collision resolution is typically comprised of moving the player to the collision point, updating velocity along the hit normal, and finally zipping out of the ground if necessary to avoid floating point precision issues. The collision detection of the slopes itself is surprisingly simple and works on the same principle as swept AABB tests: we can enlarge the slope triangle by simply moving the line towards the player by the player's half-size. Once this shift is done we only need to do a ray-line collision test. During resolution there's some slight physics cheating going on to make the player stick to the ground when going down a slope, rather than flying off, but that's it. Packets and File Formats Leaf defines a multitude of file formats. These formats are typically all defined around the idea of a packet – a collection of files in a directory hierarchy. The idea of a packet allows me to define these formats as both directly on disk, in-memory as some data structure, or encapsulated within an archive. The packet protocol isn't that complicated and I intend on either at least putting it into Trial, or putting it into its own library altogether. Either way, it allows the transparent implementation of these formats reg