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  1. For some gamers out there, platformer games can be the main deciding factor when considering which console to buy (when buying all of them is not a realistic option). Personally, I have been playing Playstation consoles my entire life, dabbling in other consoles and portable gaming platforms, yet I always seem to return to Playstation because of the exclusive games only available through their platforms. The Last of Us is an award-winning 3D action platformer game available only on Playstation consoles. The single player campaign opens in the midst of a zombie virus outbreak among the entire world. The narrative follows two characters Joel, a father to a recently deceased daughter due to the outbreak, and Ellie a teenager who is believed to hold the cure to the virus in her immune system. Joel encounters a militia group, known as the Fireflies, that formed after the outbreak and is quickly tasked with the mission of delivering Ellie to other members of the militia outside the quarantined zone. Due to the initial conflict set up by the narrative and the undercover nature of the main mission, the suggested way to play the game is by remaining out of sight as much as possible and engaging enemies in a sly manner. However, games are places people flock to when looking for an escape from reality, a place with no rules or direction in some cases. For this reason, gamers approach games from different perspectives, causing them to play the game using different strategies. Some player types such as the Killer player type defined by the Bartle player dichotomy the would prefer to take tactical approach to the task at hand, rather than a strategic one. For these type players, the combat they seek would include more face-to-face and traditional battles. For a strategic player, playing the game as if they themselves were in the shoes of the character, it is more appealing to remain as hidden as possible. The Last of Us also does a nice job of including both perspectives in specific instances. Players do not have to actively seek out or play intentionally with a certain strategy, the elements that Killers and Achievers enjoy most are built into the narrative at some main turning points, whereas most minor engagements are left up to the choice of the player. In addition to the two polarizing player types mentioned previously, The Last of Us elegantly includes elements favored by the scavenger and artisan player types as well. Above the main mission of transporting Ellie to the Fireflies, there is obviously a larger responsibility to remain alive. There are several mechanics contained within the game that players can use to increase their chances of survival. Some of these mechanics include looting and crafting. It is possible to “loot” in virtually every scene of the game, although it is entirely the player’s choice whether to spend time looting or continue on with the main story line. Looted items can be used to craft items to boost health, melee weapons, and throwable items such as Molotov cocktails and nail bombs. These items are crafted with smaller parts players find by looting abandoned place and of course, classic to most Naughty Dog games, some of the better items require more exploring. Although all players must use items and crafting to some degree in order to play through the game successfully, the game will reward players more who spend more time searching for these items. This is also a positive feedback mechanism because players who are excelling in the game will be given opportunities to make the game easier through the use of the items they are able to craft. Crafting can also allow players to make improvements to Joel’s abilities and, at certain work benches found throughout the story, his firearms. Dylan Richmond The craft-able items also introduce a variety of combat techniques that appeal to the wide array of player types. Certain enemies require some sort of tactic or craft-able item in order to defeat. A “clicker” is a type of enemy players encounter who uses its sense of hearing to detect players, making it easier for players to sneak around in plain sight, however players cannot engage this enemy without a weapon of some sort, or they will instantly die. This encourages players to come up with a clever and stealthy way to defeat this type of enemy. One option is to sneak up behind a clicker and use a craft-able item called a shiv in order to defeat the enemy. This is designed for rational players because this technique requires a great deal of thought and concentration in order to prevent the clicker from noticing the player. Aggressive players might ignore the clicker’s abilities of enhanced hearing and strength and face the clicker straight on with a gun or a melee weapon, such as a crowbar. Casual players may attempt to defeat the enemy from afar with one of the easiest methods, a Molotov cocktail. This item will attract the clicker to its flames and if the clicker has been standing in the flames for long enough, it will be defeated. This method is also best for defeating large hoards of zombies or clickers and might be chosen by a strategic or tactical player. People have all sorts of play styles, approaches, and ways of enjoying video games, many beyond the scope of merely one game. Including these alternative pathways throughout video games increase their appeal to a greater number of people, which is ultimately the goal in creating a video game, yet having these various routes also increases the overall enjoyment of the game for everyone. For any player type, it is reassuring to know that if one of the options are situationally unavailable, another option is always at hand. The Last of Us artfully combines its narrative and combat mechanics with a multitude of viable player types. It’s the cross between elements and approaches from these player types that keeps The Last of Us fresh with every new engagement. Keeping a single consistent play style throughout the entire game is not an easy task for most, often times players must use a combination of strategies, abilities, and interact with various features in order to successfully complete The Last of Us.
  2. GameDev.net

    Notes on GameDev: Jenova Chen

    Originally published on NotesonGameDev.net October 27, 2008 Jenova Chen, creator behind the multi award-winning student game Cloud and flOw, co-founder of thatgamecompany, is dedicated to expanding the emotional spectrum of video games and making them available for a much wider audience. And how did Jenova "make it" as an independent developer? With a lot of support and a drive for innovation. Can you tell us a little bit about your interest in game development and where it all started? When I was 10 years old, my Dad, who worked in the software industry, took me to a special Computer Programming school for kids hoping I'd become Bill Gate's one day. However, I had no interest in learning programming; instead I got to play my very first computer game at the school. And from that point on, video games were pretty much my obsession. My first attempt in making video games happened when I was 12, and my enthusiasm quickly faded due to a bad 5 inch floppy disk which carried a week's worth of my work. When I went to college around 1999, I was pretty much bored with the math and programming, and I started to put all my spare time on digital animation and 3D graphics. At the time, there were no domestic video game development studios in China and video game education was also a vacuum. And by accident, I met some very enthusiastic students in the college who wanted to make video games. It seemed like a good place where I could put my digital art skill to use. Once the training started, the adventure and joy from game development has never stopped. Speaking of college... What was your role in Cloud and how did it come to be? My first big student team project in the grad school at USC Interactive Media Division was not Cloud but Dyadin (IGF 2005), where my role was lead artist. It was the first video game made by student team in our division. The big success brought a lot of attention to the school, therefore the school started a grant to encourage students to team up and make more innovative games. The grant was open to the entire university. As one of the applicants I came up the rough idea of making a game about clouds and rallied around students and faculties. Once the cloud game idea won the grant and got funded by the school, we put a team together. My role was team lead. As a result I worked with the team on many aspects of the game: gameplay prototyping, game design, story and all the visual arts. What do you think made Cloud the 2006 IGF Student Showcase Winner? Being one of a kind--a fresh emotional experience that's different from anything on the mainstream market. Following Cloud, you went right on to working on flOw. How did Cloud's success influence you? It's not the success part of Cloud influenced me but the failure of Cloud. So many people downloaded our game, including people who never played games. I guess they were lured to the childhood fantasy. As a result, their lack of game knowledge prevented them from enjoying the relaxing experience---instead, their frustration of learning how to control the game ruined the experience. I learned from Cloud that there is a huge market for games that evoke a different emotional experience. However, new markets mean new audience. In order to search for a design methodology that enables a game to satisfy both experienced gamers and not so experienced ones, I started the flOw project. Interesting concept to work with! How was flOw conceptualized and developed? As part of my master degree thesis at USC, flOw, the original web game, was made for the sole purpose of testing whether the design methodology I developed based on Flow theory works. In the academia, there was a lot of many research about how to use an A.I. to read player's performance and alter the gaming experience. However, through playing those games myself, I feel there are so many cases where the A.I. can't assess player's true feeling based on rigid formulas. As a side effect, the false reaction of the A.I. broke my "sense of control", a key condition to enter the Flow state. Therefore, through learning successful video games with mass appeal, I came up a different approach to adjust the difficulties of the game. I call it Active Dynamic Difficulty Adjustment, which uses player's choice to change the difficulty of the gaming experience. The trick is to embed the difficulty adjustment choices in the core gameplay mechanics so that when player makes those choices, he won't feel interrupted from the core gameplay. In flOw, player's only action is swimming and eating, and the way the player engages different content with different difficulties is also through swimming and eating. And the result of the testing was amazing flOw is now available on PS3, something that indie developers aspire to. How did you make the leap to console? My business partner Kellee Santiago and I were very lucky to have studied at the USC Interactive Media Division where we took a class called business of interactive entertainment. It's that class that opened our eyes that starting up a company and chasing your dream is not a fairy tale; instead it's something totally possible for normal people like us who had no money, but a passion. We had a sneak peek at the great potential and promising future of video games through Cloud. And we really hope the maturing of video games as an interactive medium could happen faster. We want to push the boundary of video games and allow more people around the world to see games like Cloud, to awaken the dormant market so that more people can join us to further expand video games' emotional range and meet various needs from the public. Not just things made for excitement and leisure but also things that are thought evoking and deeply emotional. With that goal, we started to pitch the grand idea of Cloud, the commercial version to almost all the publishers in North America. Quickly, we realized that based on the experience we had fresh out of school and the ridiculous budget we asked, there was simply no one who would take the risk with us. It had to be the timing and pure luck that we encountered the opportunity of making games for the digital distribution platform for next generation console like Wii and PS3. Both of Sony and Nintendo were going to launch their new gaming consoles, and they were both dying for new content on their digital distribution channel. The fact that flOw was a rather complete game concept made with two students in three months helped us to convince Sony that they could trust us for a much smaller game than Cloud. And then the leap was made. Well that's great! What are you working on now? We are finishing up our second title for Sony's Playstation Network, Flower. A game that is a sister piece after Cloud and flOw. Our version of a video game poem dealing with our inner desires towards the wild nature and urban life. What would you say is the biggest challenge you've faced so far as an indie? The biggest challenge is to grow up, to become experienced from inexperience. We made so many mistakes in running a startup company and in game development. Though we've overcome all the challenges, the taste is still yummy pain. Heh heh. What about your biggest triumph then? Thatgamecompany is still up and running. And we are making games that we believe will push the boundary of what video games can communicate. What advice do you have out there for those aspiring to join game industry as an indie? Really consider indie game developer within our industry. Just look around at what's happened in the past two years. How many of your favorite indie games have shown up on the commercial platforms? How many highly reviewed video games are from independent studios? This is the golden time of independent video games. We see so many talented new faces coming out of school and even veterans who left the big studios to form their company and chase their dreams. The renaissance of video games is already happening.
  3. So I have a decent amount of JavaScript experience now and decided I was gonna lower my head and start cranking out some 2d games, partly to learn, partly to have fun. Afterall, HTML5 canvas is such an easy and enticing medium. I love the JavaScript implementation of it. But after literally struggling for a week to get basic game functionality working I have had enough of the little stupid bugs that pop up with JavaScript. Don't get me wrong, I still love the language for scripting. I'm just not going to spend 20 mins coding and 5 hours debugging just because the language is crap. I've decided to return to my previous endeavor, Java. I like Java a lot and the only reason I haven't pursued more in the way of game development is just for the fact that Java is limited to mobile or PC apps that may never see the light of day unless it's hosted on some obscure Java game hosting website that is populated with 2,000 half developed games that no one will ever care about. BUT, still, I enjoy hand coding and I know C# but don't feel like using Visual studio and I really don't wanna hand code C# on the .Net or whatever. I use Visual Studio for business apps (ASP.NET) but I don't wanna build a game with it. So, does anyone have any points to share about why moving to Java for game development is not smart? Besides the whole, "Java is slow" thing. I mean things that might make it harder in JAva to make games vs. in other languages. Please share your thoughts.
  4. Hi, I started implementing 2D board game. I have concept of how to write rules, controlls etc, but i dont want to write another all-in-app. So i decided to do it "right". I divided my code into reuseable modules - ResourceManager, Renderer, Core, Math (for now). All modules use SDL2. ResourceManager(RM) - loads textures, audio etc without duplicating them in memory. Resources are gathered in TextureResource, AudioResource (...) objects, handled by std::shared_ptr. For textures I have prepared Texture class that wraps SDL_Texture and I RM serves this Texture objs for Core module. Core - The main game module, contains game loop, gameobject / component implementation and event handling. Core requests for data from RM and sends them to right components. Renderer - Creates window and knows about render range (in core represented by camera). Takes info about texture, position, rotation and scale to render images (just this for now). Its time for my questions: is this architecture good? After I end this board game I want to extend renderer module for example for rendering 3D objects. Loading resources while ingame is good idea? I mean single textures, models, sounds etc. As I said, for handling resources I am using shared_ptr, is it good cleaning cache every (for example) 3 minutes? By cleaning i mean removing not used resources (counter =1). And the hardest thing for me right now - take a look at this flow: Core create a T1 token Component Renderer2D is connected to T1. Core requests a texture /textures/T1.png from RM. RM checks if /textures/T1.png is in map, if not, loads it. RM returns a std::shared_ptr<Texture> to Core. Core assign texture to T1 Renderer2D component. Now i want to pass this object to renderer. But I wont pass all gameObjects and checks which have renderer2D component (i also cant, because only Core know what is gameObject and component). So i had an idea: I can create Renderable interface (in Renderer module) and inherit from it in the renderer2D component. Renderable will contain only pointers to position data. Now i am able to pass renderer2D component pointer to Renderer and register it. Is this good way to handle this? Or im overcomplicating things? If point above is right I had last question - registering object in Renderer module. I dont want to iterate over all objects and check if I can render them (if they are in render range). I wanted to place them in "buckets" of - for example - screen size. Now calculating collisions should be faster - i would do this only for objects in adjacent buckets. But for 2D game i have to render objects in correct order using Z index. Objects have to be placed in correct bucket first, then sorted by Z in range of bucket. But now i have problem with unregistering objects from Renderer module. I think I got lost somewhere in this place... Maybe You can help me? Of course it this is correct way to handle this problem. I would love to read your comments and tips about what can I do better or how can i solve my problems. If i didnt mention something but You see something in my approach, write boldly, I will gladly read all Your tips :).
  5. Hey, nice seeing you again! I can safely say that this update is packing quite a punch, so let's get right to it! Patching up holes First, I want to talk about navigation meshes. Previously, only the procedurally generated floors were included in the navmesh baking process. This meant that all special rooms (aside for landfills and gyms) were completely inaccessible for any NPCs. This was due to two issues. The first one was simply that the navmesh baker only looked for the generated floor rather than any walkable surface. In Unity, it was just a matter of changing things a bit to use a bound box rather than checking in the object's hierarchy. The other issue was the way the floor was generated... Previously, most special rooms using static assets had floors that only covers the room itself, without counting the actual connective gap between it and the rest of the rooms. Because the floors were generated using marching squares, that connection's floor turns into an awkwardly shaped triangle, and thus created two small triangular holes. The problem was fixed by simply adding another square of the floor after that connective square. With these two solutions, NPCs are now able to enter and navigate special rooms, so there's no escape now! New Relics and capacities Next, there's now a lot of newly implemented capacities (and thus relics). Backup Floppy Capacities This relic comes with the Second Chance capacity Second Chance When the player is about to die, then they instantaneously regain 25% of their health. This capacity can only be used once. You can, however, have that capacity many times and thus have multiple chances. Stats Bonuses DEF -35% HP -25% Beach Ball Capacities This relics only has one capacity: Double Jump. Double Jump This capacity is self-explanatory: You can now jump again in mid-air. Stats Bonuses AGL -12% Concentrated ATK Juice Capacities This relics comes with two capacities: Slow Attack and Charge Up Slow Attack This capacity simply slows down the attack speed. It also influences the charging times of chargeable weapons (like bows). This capacity can also be applied multiple times, meaning that attacks get slower and slower the more Slow Attack capacities you have. Charge Up This capacity lends to the wearer the capacity to charge attacks with swingable weapons like swords. A charged attack will have a somewhat substantial damage bonus depending on how long the player held the attack button. Quite useful to deal with stronger enemies! Stats Bonuses ATK +25% AGL -10% Echo Drop Capacities This relic only got one capacity: Shockwave. Shockwave With this capacity, the entity can generate a shockwave when they attack if they're lucky. This makes any enemies in a small radius take damage no matter if they're hidden or not Stats Bonuses DEF -29% Electronic Mask Capacities This relic comes with two capacities: See Enemy Health and Clairvoyance. See Enemy Health This capacity is quite self-explanatory. It gives the player the ability to see any targeted enemy's current health. Quite handy for planning attacks! Clairvoyance This capacity helps the player find their way by rendering a nice glowing path to the exit. The path actually gets refreshed every 5 seconds, and there's even a nice fade-out. Here's a picture of that path As you can see it's really AESTHETIC. The colours of that path are picked from our palette, meaning that it changes colours depending on the current level. Stats Bonuses DEF + 5% HP -20% Fan Of Violence Capacities This relic lends two capacities: Corrosive Spead and Enflamer Corrosive Spead This capacity makes any killed enemies drop a puddle of poisonous blood. If another enemy walks on it they instantaneously become poisoned (if they don't have any other status effect that is). The puddle dries up after a while. As of now, there's no actual damaged dealt directly to enemies when they stand on a puddle. This might an idea for later, though. Enflamer This capacity is quite easy to understand: you now deal fire damages and have a chance to give the burning status to any attacked entities. Stats Bonuses ATK +5% HP -5% Flying Shoe Capacities This relic only got one capacity: Hover. Hover This capacity makes the entity able to glide for a short period of time after a jump. Simply press and hold the jump button to glide. After a bit, the glide will stop. You can also release the jump button during a glide to stop it. One would think that the Double Jump capacity would counteract with this one but one would be wrong: just hold the button down after the double jump. This paired with a ranged weapon will make a deadly combo. Stats Bonuses HP -5% New Activatable Item Next, I want to talk about a new activated Item: French Fried French Fried Alignment: Future Funk Description This is a rather funny looking moustached french fry wearing a beret and smoking a cigarette (Don't smoke, kids). This item can summon a seagull familiar that attacks any nearby enemies for a limited amount of time. Once the time runs out the seagull disappears. The player can have up to 3 seagulls at a time. there's also a cooldown before the item can be used again. Capacities Aside for its activatable ability, the Hover capacity is also given to the player as long as they hold the item. Stats Bonuses DEF -11% Headshots! I've previously thrown the idea around of having different damage bonuses if the player targets a specific body part with a projectile. I'm proud to say that the feature is now fully implemented. Now there's a 5x damage multiplier to projectile if they hit the head (for example). Although these bonuses exist, there's still a lot of balancing to do and whatnot. But I got to say that it's quite fun headshooting enemies with arrows (mainly because enemies aren't balanced yet). This works (of course) for any projectiles. Mouse Refactored There's also have been a big mouse control refactor. Previously, the mouse script I used wasn't as flexible as I originally thought. Rather than coding everything from the ground up, I've decided to cherry-pick code from Unity's standard Assets FirstPersonController script. I Initially wanted to fully use the controller, but there were some input delays with the Update and FixedUpdate functions. I decided to pick its MouseLook script and integrate it into my custom PlayerController. The results were night and day. Not only I could easily change the sensitivity, but there's even a "Smooth Mouse" function which interpolates mouse movements. Mouse Sensitivity Speaking of mouses, I've also added the ability to change the mouse sensitivity. This was made after many feedbacks of my playtesters, who were either unable to use the mouse properly or complained about an excessively sensitive mouse. The Mouse Sensitivity setting takes the form of two components: a slider and an input field. In essence, the input field is used to save the actual sensitivity, while the slider is just a more tactile way to set the sensitivity. Right now, changing the slider will update the input field, which in turns updates the mouse sensitivity. If the player wants an absurd sensitivity (like 100 or something), they can't use the slider for that (which only goes up to 20 right now) and instead have to manually input this in the input field. There's also another checkbox component controlling that previously mentioned "Smooth Mouse" mode. Pause Screen Option Tab Now there's an options tab in the pause menu: This is a quick way to change common settings such as volume slides and mouse sensitivity among other things. These work just like their Main Menu counterparts. Once the player closes the pause menu, options are automatically saved. Quite handy if you want to adjust your mouse sensitivity mid-game, or lowering volumes while streaming. Closed Rooms Previously, all rooms were open form the getgo. The player could technically speedrun their way through the game without breaking a sweat. This kinda made the game quite boring, as there weren't any valid reason to destroy every enemy in each room. This was in a dire need of change. So I've now implemented a linear progression system, in which the player needs to clear the room of any enemy before passing on. Of course, the player can break walls or enter special rooms anytime (mainly because these rooms are optional and won't provide any shortcuts at all), but in order to go to the next room, they need to clean the room first. The way this works is by having closed/opened doors (much like locked doors but without any type of locks). This makes the game feel more like a game, although there's still place for improvement. Minor Upgrades Fixed the MSAA artifact bugs It was quite simple: just use FXAA Technically I can also do TAA (Temporal Anti Aliasing), but this could be put in the options. Of course, there's a lot of other options, but right now FXAA does the job just fine There might be better options, or maybe an MSAA fix but this will wait. Added a looping testing sound effect when fiddling around with the Sound Effect volume slider This is for both the Main Menu's options screen and the Pause Menu Options tab. Fixed a lot of bugs, especially with destruction/creation Charging an attack now slow down the player Once the player unleashes its attack it resets Previously both the Quick and Slow Attack capacities only affected swing speeds. Now they also affect the charging rate. Added a touch of Ambient Occlusion I will probably put this in the options later on... Next Week Even with a cold doing its thing I'm still trying to be proactive and work on the game. In fact, yesterday I started working on a draft of a boss behaviour tree. Although still really rough and full of bugs I think I can have a working boss ready for next week. Afterwards, It'll be modelling time again, but this time it'll be level specific stuff. And after that, there's other relics, items, food, capacities and abilities that are left in the design document that needs to be implemented in the game, which means modelling, coding, designing and whatnot. But right now let's focus on bosses...
  6. For my game, Forsaken Alchemy (FA for short), I've got a loot system that's pretty simplistic to start but doesn't get me anywhere. I wanted to get rid of the RNG loot drop trope I've seen so many times in games. Instead of relying on RNG Jesus, you get specific items from enemies by killing them a certain way, so you get what you earned 100%. For example, if you want some hair from this hairy enemy, that's not going to be there if you burn it to death, right? However, if you stab said enemy to death, you'd always be able to harvest its hair. I'm not putting equipment or money as loot because in FA, all the equipment you need is handed to you early on, and there's this Replicator item that lets you duplicate most objects, so there'd be no point in having a currency system, in my opinion, if you could just replicate items infinitely and sell them. Ok, I know for most RPG players out there, what I just said must sound shocking, but equipment in the game isn't like major stat modifying gear that's in Final Fantasy, Dragon Quest, any MMORPG out there, etc. You've got 3 sets of armor. Light, medium, and heavy. You can only equip up to 5 pieces from each set at a time. Light armor increases a stat called turn priority, which is one of two things that dictates who goes next in the turn order, but the trade-off is that you also take more damage. Heavy armor is the opposite, so you're slower but more defensive. Individual pieces of medium armor protect the character from debuffs. Each character has their unique, personal weapon, so there's no weapon upgrades out there. Accessories are also there for reducing damage taken of one element while increasing damage taken of another element as a trade-off. The only reason why I made equipment so simple is because I'd like minimalism to be one of the game's strong suits. Instead of having a hundred different armor pieces, accessories, and weapons that players collect throughout the game until finally getting gear that's completely superior to everything else, just give them all near the beginning, so they can experiment and learn what best fits the scenario, and there will be several situations where each piece of equipment is useful, so none will be forgettable. As far as why you have a Replicator that duplicates most items, I have that to remove the need to grind/farm for items that'll be necessary for a lot of alchemy recipes to make battle items. It'll be balanced by having a strict space and weight limit per item per character, and the Replicator can't be used in battles. Also, everyone automatically gets healed after every battle, so there'd be no reason to replicate healing items to use over and over again outside of battle. I didn't want that to be a chore for players to constantly make new healing items right before using them after fights. Anyway, now that you know why equipment and money aren't part of the loot system, and we're only getting enemy-related items, like that hair I mentioned at the beginning, where to go from here? I was thinking of having that be a completionist hunt for all the different types of loot, but then, what would be the purpose of doing that? Maybe have an optional cosmetics thing that uses loot? I don't wanna say I've written myself in a corner because I'm sure there's a viable answer out there that doesn't remove what I've already laid down. Before you say, "Make quests that revolve around getting enemy-dropped items, so you kill enemies in specific ways to get said items," I'm not going to do that. That's just a twist on the trope of "Kill this enemy to get this item" that we see in so many games. Besides, even if I do make quests about that, what would be the reward for the player? I just talked about the lack of need for new equipment and money. The sidequests I do make for FA will have character relationship development rewards, and no, I won't make kill quests give that reward because that kind of thing is meant for sidequests that have a mystery conflict the player has to solve through gathering evidence and piecing them together alongside certain characters. Before you say, "Make each loot item be an optional ingredient to make alchemy recipes stronger," I thought of that already, and I don't want players to think, "Look, a new enemy! Time to get all the different loot and see what they do to make alchemy stronger than usual." The reason why not is because, even though this is an RPG and RPGs usually have you kill a ton of random enemies to get leveled up in preparation for bosses, I'm not doing that. I'm giving the player alternate paths around random enemies, so it'd be possible to go boss to boss, and level ups aren't beneficial since enemies will level up with you. In fact, I made level ups more of an extra challenge for those that think the game's too easy. Of course I'll throw in a warning in-game, so players don't accidentally make their playthrough harder. That's not to say you should avoid all random enemies because I made it possible to still beat them but not get exp while getting all the different types of loot. The reason why random enemies are even a thing is learning practice for bosses since I have a very adaptive A.I. per enemy type, so players are always learning to train their responsiveness.
  7. Hi all! We are a team of two programmers developing a turn-based browser strategy, and we need someone to help with the art. It is a card+board strategy. Every player has a castle, and in their turn can move units and play cards. Current art is partially placeholder, partially original (contributed by some friends), but we'd love to have somebody joining the team and taking care of the visual side. Main tasks are drawing cards, objects on the board and interface elements. A prototype is available here https://lords.world (needs at least two people to play properly, but you can play against a dummy bot to get an idea). Please pm if interested. Best regards, Andrii and Serge
  8. Last week wasn't as productive as the last, but it's still substantial nevertheless. So without further ados, let's get to it! GUIs Previously, some GUI elements didn't scale to the screen's density. This meant that no matter the resolution those items always remained at a set size. This was fine and dandy, but now that menus are implemented it's primordial to have some kind of cohesion. The main reason why such constraint existed was mainly due to those wacky title bars of those funky windows. Before these were all textures, and in essence, I wanted to make sure that these won't get blurred or offset, so keeping the same scale was the only choice back then. I, however, tried a different approach: because these funky lines were relatively simple and didn't require any type of special texture I thought that we could easily replace them with custom geometries. This way I can control where each vertex goes and how they adapt to the GUI element's rectangle. After a bit of tinkering, I finally managed to change this, meaning that I could now get rid of the unscaled canvas. As you can see the results are a whole lot better : And here's how it looked previously: And just for comparison, let's take a look at the GUI at my screen's native resolution: It was a long-awaited change, to be honest. Especially if I want to try to have dynamic resolutions in the future. Wonderful Sounds One of the most striking updates has to be the sounds. Previously, there weren't any sounds yet, but now there are progressively more and more varied sounds, making the game a bit more complete. On most items (collectables and whatnot) there's now a physic sound that plays when the item's associated rigid body get hit. The sound changes its volume based on the impact velocity's magnitude. This makes locating those items so much easier. Similarly, there's now another sound that plays when said item gets picked up. Let's take a look: As you can see (or heard in that case), most sounds are also given a random pitch just to spice things up. Weapon Balances Another big upgrade would be weapons. After a bit of closed testing, I've realized that the weapons could need a bit of balancing. The Gun Got Nerfed The Gun itself got a slight nerf. Before each bullet shot could be recycled. This, in effect, makes it behave more like Heavy Bullets. However, it was clear that picking up each of these bullets were kind of a pain for most people. So I've decided to reduce the amount of time a bullet can be recycled by linking that recycling to the player's current luck stats. In the future, there might be even actual bullet magazines and an automatic reload process (or manual). This way we could counteract the fact that bullets would be scarce if the player has poor luck. The bow got buffed The bow, however, got a big buff. Now, arrows are infinite. This effectively means that there are no more melee attacks and every time the player wants to attack a pre-charge is needed. The Mini Map Next, there's a new Minimap. This Minimap shows a simplified layout of the level. The room the player is currently in is also highlighted, and it changes when the player moves to another room. Each type of rooms has their own colours, which is dictated by the colour palette. This means that each level has their own room colours. If this might be a hindrance then this could be easily changed, but so far I simply lack the data to know. So far all rooms are shown (even the hidden ones), but eventually, only the discovered rooms would be shown. There's also no other things as of yet. There might be enemies, items and whatnot. These would be pretty easy to implement though. The map also rotates to match the player's view. It also follows the player around so that the player's position will always at the middle of the map. Take a look: Minor updates Fixed a bug with enemies' animations not working properly; Undid (partially) the UnityEvent's to also use C# native events: As seen here, there's basically no reasons to use UnityEvents rather than native C# events. One of the reasons one might use UnityEvents is of they use a serialized and strongly linked. But overall it's significantly slower; Another reason for the undoing is simply because my capacities are technically not serialized. This means that those capacities listeners are never invoked when the event is called. Added an empty Option tab in the pause menu. Next week So next I'll probably work a bit on the minimap, and perhaps fix a few graphical bugs linked with the MSAA applied to the game. Some models get unwanted gaps between shared vertices: So I might have to implement FXAA or TAA to fix this. Afterwards, it's boss time!
  9. First AI Unit look The county Sheriff The game will have various type of unit that will investigate your behavior and that will populate each level. Depending on your action unit will become harder and in bigger number. The basic unit is the regular cop, followed by the sheriff. Second unit type is the army soldier, followed by their caporal. Third unity type is the Majestic unity, which are governement alien oriented unit. Each of the unit will have their look change based on their location and behavior (ability and feature) affected by their rank. For instance, a soldier may or may not wear a night vision, allowing them to see you in the dark, but they won't be able to see you if you are cloacked; then, their caporal, may or may not be equip by a heat vision allowing them to see you cloack. Global awareness effect Each action you do can affect your global awereness and if the globe know about your presence on earth, they will prepared themself. Some city may be under the protection of the army, while some region may increase the amount of patrol to keep the street secure. In this non linear game experience we want action to have consequences. That statement is often trown in the air and we don't pretend there is a good or a bad way to do it, but we want to make sure that each game you play is really unique and different. We want this addictive game to be fun as you try over and over to beat it. Beating the game is going to be very challenging, it has this core arcade root that require painfull death and frustrating time But unlike classic game that you really replay the same game over and over untill you learn the pattern, this one is trying to be different on each session while allowing you to improve with the core level design of each country. State of the game update Almost a year of development. I can't beleive it. It much more work then i thought, but it much much better than what I was hoping to achieve. We are confident in delivering a full feature indie game. It's fun to finally work on visual stuff, i insisted to work only on the code to make sure it was possible to do my vision before doing anything visual to avoid wasting time and focus on feature. Now that everything is done in a rough state, the focus was on building the basic asset. We now have enough asset to start building a level. Once the level is done, we can finally test all feature in real-game environnement and slowly improve their functionnality and the look/special FX/sound of each of them. We can also slowly add asset and replace generic one. Add more unit and create all three playable caracther. All the core feature (script) is working and being tested / improved / rewritten The main menu is completed (no audio yet) Soundtrack is completed (very nice bad ass classic sounding retro music score) The hangar is completed (no audio yet) 80% of the assets required to build 2 levels are completed We are implementing temporal AA for highest quality possible. We are still updating/improving character controller and AI for better performance Current Milestone : Build the tutorial level (so we can test all feature in 1 single map and improve them) (3 month) Next Milestone : Build a demo level to show the game (1-2 month) Third Milestone : Finalise asset, playable character, sound and special FX of first 2 level (2 month)
  10. Hi there, my name is René, and Im a pixel artist, this is my first post here and Im kind of exploring my own freelancing possibilities in the field. Please excuse my english, Im from the chaotic Venezuela, I'm currently living in Colombia, and looking forward to know another beautiful country and culture. I have years of experience working professionally on 2d and 3d animated pieces for a wide variety of cases, but I'm a bit tired of rendering times, illumination artifacts, rigging and binding stuff here and there, processor slowness, plugins mismatch, plugin bugs, plugins outdated, licensing updates, corporative projects, that's a good reason, and found a lovely branch on the field that embraced my like a cotton cloud on a shiny day, Pixel Art. Then I begun a surprisingly productive journey on Fiverr a few months ago, until a guy got my attention with a interesting project that I'm about to begin. So I had to put my Fiverr status on standby for a while. While we take our time to start that project, my mind and hart asks for a taste of the Patreon experience, and so I've been thinking for a while of doing something related to the Cyberpunk dystopia, but as I have no time to do another project, I thought releasing graphic assets packs in some way, so I've been relating this and that and figuring maybe in some developers community I could let know this to begin with. There are so many styles and mechanics on the gaming possibilities that I want to release a wide range of assets for general purposes, but inside a unique world theme, so I made my mind over this Cyberpunk topic now, but if things go well, I would need to ask to the audience for a new Theme. This is my on my avatar hehe by the way, just a pic to express a bit of my animation skills. I established my corner on Patreon already, but I have little knowledge of the platform, so any suggestions are welcome, and you are welcome as well to visit and comment any inquiry related to the topic. Check it here: My Patreon Thanks for reading. Have a nice day! René.
  11. I am currently an undergrad several months from graduation. My major is in Game Programming and Development. During the course of my studies, we've had a few modeling classes and I really took to it and feel that is the direction I really want to go, specifically I would love to become a character artist. I keep hearing about your portfolio being super important, but I've really never been able to find out what kind of work is best to put into my portfolio. There's no "put 2 of these and 1 of those in," kind of tips. I get that I'll want to put some characters I've modeled in there, but I guess what I really want to know is, if I want my portfolio to be noticed and taken seriously for a character artist position, what is the best way to present it? Since most of my courses have dealt more with programming, I need to build everything for my modeling portfolio on the side, outside of class on my own time. I know there are no specific numbers like: put 3 realistic humans, 2 robots, a creature, and a stylistic character in your portfolio. But as a general rule is there some kind basic guideline or tips for what to make to get your portfolio off to a good start?
  12. jb-dev

    The Almighty Mini Map

    From the album: Vaporwave Roguelite

    I've recently added a mini map on the right upper corner of the screen. With this the player can now see in which room it's currently in. That mini map get updated when the player moves to another room. In the future most rooms will be hidden until the player discovers it by either moving to a new room or, in the case of hidden rooms break a breakable wall or open the locked door.
  13. Orangatang Games is a new indie gaming company team looking for new members to work on it's first PC title Ruminate. The game is about a hero who's lost his memories and is on a quest to rediscover them. The game is a clever physics-based 2D puzzle platformer. It is inspired by the Karoshi games and flash-based platform racing games. One interesting feature of the game is an in-game level editor, server side functionality will later be added to the game to allow online level sharing. Around 80% of the coding for the game is already complete! All it needs now is some inspirational artwork, interesting level designs, and a couple boss battles! Who we're looking for: Passionate individuals who have some experience in their field of expertise. -Level Designer -2D Artist & Animator -Musician -Writer Payment: For now, members who work on the project will discuss a revenue sharing percentage until a quality demo is produced and the kickstarter begins. Once the Kickstarter begins, depending on how much money is raised, artists and team members may agree on a paid salary. Requirements: - Skilled, has required software for your chosen role. - Responsible, mature, and gets the job done. - Examples of work How to Apply: PM me on this site or discord @Orangatang#0141 with some examples of your work, a quick summary of yourself, any previous project experience, and approximately how much time you can spend working on the project every week. Try the Demo: If your interested in seeing what I've completed thus far, feel free to click on the following google drive link and download an early prototype demo! Any constructive feedback would be appreciated! Windows Version: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1dQLPuuHqvmMldmA87-cEKW60RrLBdDKz
  14. Hello Villagers! There’s no way to actually prove this, but I’m pretty sure more people have played fishing mini-games than have actually gone fishing. You can fish in Zelda, in Nier, in Red Dead Redemption 2, in Pokemon, in Deadly Premonition, in Torchlight, in Yakuza. You can hardly walk into a Gamestop without tripping over a pile of rods and tackle boxes. And of course fishing is especially prominent in life sim games like Animal Crossing, Harvest Moon, and Stardew Valley. Village Monsters is no different – fishing was one of the first hobbies I added to the game. There’s a lot to draw inspiration from, and if it seems the tone of this post is overly negative it isn’t because I don’t like fishing mini-games… it’s because of how intimidating they are! With so many different standards and expectations there are almost too many options, and this left me feeling paralyzed when designing the system for my game. The good news is I’ve finally settled on a system, and I’m super excited to talk about it. But first let’s talk about how bad of a designer I am. Failed Prototypes I prototype every feature – often before I even analyze or document it – and fishing was no different. In a lot of ways prototypes are ‘meant’ to fail (seeing what doesn’t work is more valuable sometimes than seeing what does), but my fishing prototypes took the word ‘failure’ to a whole new level. My very first prototype was similar to what you find in Breath of Fire. You’d be presented with a side view of the body of water you’re fishing in and your goal was to guide your hook to a fish and reel it back to shore. 1st Prototype, 2017 It was… fine. It was certainly unique compared to my contemporaries, but the more I played with it the more I realized this wasn’t necessarily a good thing. It was equal parts clunky and boring, and I scrapped it shortly before the Kickstarter. The prototypes that followed were all over the place. I experimented with “fish HP” and “rod HP”, I put in timed button challenges, I tried out things like line strength and fish stamina and generated all sorts of random numbers. Another fishing prototype I wanted to capture the full cycle of fishing – the relaxation of waiting, the excitement of hooking, the struggle of reeling in a big one – but nothing I tried was working. You might even say I was floundering… heh… heh… ugh. Then one day inspiration struck. Perhaps it was Poseidon himself that whispered in my ear, or perhaps it was that 4th Monster energy I just drank. Whatever the case was, the outline of fishing should look like revealed itself before me anchored by three words… Dash, Mash & Clash Fishing in Village Monsters can be broken up into three distinct phases which I lovingly call Dash, Mash, and Clash. After casting your line in a body of water the music dims and you can let your mind wander as the outside world fades into the periphery – that is, until a fish bites. That’s the Dash, referring to how you must quickly hook the fish before it gets away. After hooking the fish it’s time to Mash, which is exactly what it sounds like. Your job is to reel in the fish as fast as possible. There’s no subtlety required, so mash that reel button as hard as you can. A little fishing meter tracks your progress. Of course, most fish won’t be too pleased about the hook in their mouth and they’ll often try to fight back. This leads to our next stage, Clash, which finds you being challenged with a series of button prompts as the fish attempts to get away. If you miss a prompt then you’ll start losing the progress you made reeling the fish in. Miss too many and the slippery fish will make their escape.. However! If you manage to get a “Perfect” during this stage then the fish’s defenses are shattered which makes it much easier to reel in. This gives the clash stage a high risk / high reward component and acts as a test of skill compared to the previous test of stamina. These two stages cycle back and forth until the fish is caught or gets away. How often they cycle and for how long depends on the fish. Easier or smaller fish need less reeling in while legendary fish require several clashes before they submit. And there you have it! Fishing is finalized in forthcoming folly, Fillage Fonsters. What’s Next? Finalizing any gameplay mechanic is sorta like writing the 1st draft of a story – it’s a great feeling of accomplishment, but there’s lot of editing and polish to do. Now that I have all these levers and nobs to play with it’s time to give each fish a “personality” – heavy fish that are hard to reel in, fish with extremely quick ‘hook windows’, and so on. There’s also an entire range of possibilities for upgrades: lures that attract fish faster or rods that make reeling in easier. Then I can start looping back into other parts of the game, like a potion that slows down the clash stage, or a mushroom that attracts rare fish when used as bait. You’ll be able to play with the new fishing system yourself once the latest Village Monsters demo hits later this month.
  15. Currently if I was to program a game using C++ with SFML or Java with LibGDX I would render game objects by calling "object.render()" on the game object. Although this makes it easy to access the information necessary to render the game object, it also couples rendering to the game logic which is something I would like to move away from. How can rendering be implemented so that it is decoupled from the game objects? I wish to know how this can be done in the standard object oriented paradigm, so please don't suggest that I use an ECS. Thank you.
  16. Does anyone have any recommendations for good books on game engine design for 2D games that a beginner would comprehend? I'm not looking for something pertaining to a specific language or anything, but something that will give me a good understanding of game engines in general that I can then apply to my own projects. Basically, I'm self taught up to this point and would like to expand my knowledge. Thanks.
  17. Hi there, and welcome to this very special weekly update! Yes indeed, this one can be special. Everything about this update is related in one form or another to death. As you may or may not know death (or the capacity for a player to lose) can be an important part of any game. It can take many forms but in our case, it's a typical death. So without any further ados, let's dive right into it! Weapons and View models One of the most striking updates I've made was to weapons, or more precisely how the player uses weapons. Previously attacks, in general, were mainly governed by actual skeletal animations (i.e. the actual world model of the player) This meant that when a player swings a weapon the attack would be oriented not to the head of the player but to its body. One adverse effect of this is that the player couldn't aim up or down. Now, I've introduced view models to the game. For those who didn't know, view models are 3D models that only appear on the player view. (Think of it like gun models in Frist Person Shooters) These make it really easy to align attack not to the actual world model but to the view. This is especially useful to fix our up/down aiming problems. swings.mp4 Of course, this meant that a big refactor was in order but I think it makes the game much more enjoyable. Another effect of this change is that guns and other aiming weapons now have their own animations, meaning that they are now actually aiming at the crosshair in the middle of the screen. There's also a unique melee attack animation for these too. swingAim.mp4 Charging Weapons Previously, changing weapons such as the Bow didn't have any visual indicator of how much tense the bow was. Although this could have been fixed with animations, I didn't rig any weapons as of now. Paired this with the view models refactor and it wasn't really wise to immediately embark on such adventure. To fix this I've decided to add a nice charging bar that shows how much power a charged attack will have. There's even a nice gradient and everything. chargeBar.mp4 Projectiles and compound colliders Previously there was no actual difference between melee and ranged attacks. Both used the same colliders and did the same damage. However, now this has changed. Projectiles are now testing their hits based on a completely different set of hitboxes that are spread all over the model, one for each body part. This makes hit detection react realistically. It also means that, in case of arrows, we can stick the arrow to a particular body part and make the former follow the latter in a realistic manner. gettingShot.mp4 There could be a damage bonus in the future but at the moment it's not a priority. Aside from that, there's another benefit of using compound colliders: rigid bodies. When the player attacks using a projectile and make a lethal strike, the game can then apply a given force to the rigid body that was hit, making ragdolls behave more realistically than ever before. Death And finally, here's the best part: our own mortality. Yes, now players can experience the full thing. When their health drops down to zero, players simply die in a flamboyant way by using ragdolls. When they die, the camera is transferred to a ragdoll and a sad jingle is played. death.mp4 Death Popup After the jingle ends a nice death popup shows up and the player has three different options. Retry This options simply reuses the same run configs (aside from the seed which is regenerated) and start a new one. Main Menu This options boots back the player to the main menu. From there the player can load a new save file and start a new run with a different character and seed. Exit This is quite simple: it ends the game and closes the app. Popup Text The popup itself has dynamic texts that changes based on how powerful the last blow was. In the future, there might be different types of damages leading to different types of texts. We might even change the text based on what killed the player, to begin with. That's about it for death. Minor Updates Fixed many bugs related to enemies. Refactored almost everything. Every C# events were replaced by UnityEvents. Although their implementation isn't actually any better than the native one this gives us the ability to edit events directly in the Unity Editor. It can also give us the ability to change which type of collections are used to store every observer. More optimization opportunities, yay! Added a bunch of extension methods (That thing is OP, to be honest) Removed a bunch of unused codes and whatnot. Reduced muzzle flashes. This could have been hazardous for epileptic people. Added a nice keyboard (?) model. Fixed bugs whit the analog blur effect dishing out unclamped colour values, resulting in strange dark lines artifacts. Added a death plane at the bottom of levels. This means that pesky player that found their way out will suffer the consequences. 😈 fallDeath.mp4 Fixed bugs with the character selector highlighting the wrong character when switching screens. Changed some sounds and added a bunch of new ones. Next week Next week will probably a continuation of the cleaning process. Afterwards, it's boss time! I've also started to read this book on game design, so there might be some unplanned edits here and there, too.
  18. Soooo.... I've been working out some of the ideas I've had in mind for the game I've been building all this silly infrastructure for.. haha. I know, I'm the most backwards thing you've probably ever heard of. Anyhow, I've always been a huge fan of games with some real-time strategy elements built in. So, I guess that's more or less the genre I'm going with here. I've sketched up some major "objectives" or game "phases", I'm not sure if these will be actual *** OBJECTIVE COMPLETED *** YOU MAY NOW PROCEED TO LEVEL 2 ***, type objectives, but regardless. Most of these objectives past #2 will correspond to a specific "quest" type activity that will be presented to the player for their somewhat optional consideration. Here they are: Objective 1: Minimal operational status. The player will work through making repairs to their bot with found parts until it is at minimal operational status. This will also serve to tutorialize some main game-play elements. Story Elements: Post intro: First person camera, bot comes online slowly with errors flashing in from all angles. Some appendage is severely damaged, or missing. Some other major systems are offline or considerably hindered and in need of immediate(limited time) repair. Damages will be randomized so each attempt will be different, it could/and possibly should take a few tries to get a working bot out of the beginning gauntlet. Antagonists: Lower Bots, bots who have achieved some level of self-awareness yet exhibit almost zero predictably conscientious behavior. These bots will seek to either dismantle the player bot or to befriend it, or sometimes, both... Objective 2: Basic Crafting, Recycling and Mining. The player will master basic crafting skills required to make simple parts from recycled, or raw elemental matter, and repair them in the field. Story Elements: Player has achieved nearly full operational status and has begun exploring the "world", aided by all kinds of indicators and on-screen displays the player has discovered the usefulness of the garbage piles as well as discovered how to mine resources directly from the moon itself. Antagonists: Lower bots, Peer player bots, junk haulers, and guard patrols. Notes: New players will be dropped into a part of the world that will be hard to get back into(kinda pointless as well) once you've completed Objective 2. This place will be a fairly hostile dumping ground where bots are consistently dropped from great heights and regularly used as target practice by the haulers(human) and guards(human). Objective 3: Bot Programming. The player will learn how to connect to other bots in order to encode their loyalty and put them to task. Story Elements: The player has achieved Objective 2 and has escaped from the "intro zone".. Now begins the game, the first narrative characters will appear at this time and will instruct the player in ways they can proceed to find territory and to assert their control over the lower bots. Antagonists: Lower bots, Peer player bots, only occasional haulers and guard patrols. Objective 4: Bot Networking. The player will obtain the hardware/software upgrades necessary to connect to other loyalty encoded bots for the purpose of combining processing power and increasing their ability to perform complex tasks(Max of 5 to 10 per player). This stage will also introduce shared loyalty, where multiple player bots can use the same loyalty code, thus enabling multiple players to collaborate without their loyal bots fighting each other. Command loyalty always resides with the last programmer, so they only obey orders from the programmer that encoded them most recently. Story Elements: First major quest taking the player an extremely long distance away from their "territory". The player will have to prepare their band of loyal bots pretty well in order to make it back with the prize. Antagonists: Aside from major narrative related NPCs the antagonists from this stage forward will primarily be other players and their loyal bots competing for resources plus some mob type activity from lower bots here and there. Objective 5: Advanced Crafting. The player will learn how to repair damaged bot MagCores and to build and repair various other complex components. MagCores are the future processors that when combined in two or more pairs(4+ cores) have the power spark self-awareness. Story Elements: It takes one core to run the MagMagic tech that makes a bot mobile, it takes 2 to make it do anything with it. When redundancy was added, that's when strange things started to happen. Narrative characters will be used to explain how things came to be, and what can be done about it. Objective 6: Incorporation. Using all the skills learned thus far the player will begin building a small functional production site(town). Raw materials will be gathered and processed in various structures. Defensive structures will be built and the site will be guarded by technology developed and deployed by the player and their loyal bots. Objective 7: Production. During this phase the player will be encouraged through narration to build their production capacities up to the established minimum levels across the board. Objective 8: Mobilization. With production solidly under way, its time to begin thinking about the bigger picture, what resources can we mine if we have some faster transportation? What can we make then? Objective 9: Infrastructure. Through constant attacks(greater mobilization only makes the attacks worse) from other players/hordes and mob/npc characters alike, the player will be encouraged to build up their infrastructure/armaments to meet the demand. Until they are no longer threatened within their territory. Objective 10: Discovery. The player will discover the original production site for the MagCore technology burried beneath the rubble of this garbage moon and will learn the original source of its power. Story Elements: This will end the primary narrative of the main story-line. So, its something like a real-time strategy game, just with a handful of units per player, and on a fairly massive 3D world with lots of resources and cool stuff to make. Battles to fight, production sites to protect, mines to guard. Mysteries to discover, and a moon to transform from a garbage heap into the shining example of what an aware and sentient mind in a robot body can build. Or you can just go rogue and wander around exploring the planet, helping lower bots achieve higher levels of awareness and consciousness, participating in small narrative quests and the like. Or maybe you'll build a roving horde and dismantle your way across the terrain building your core collection as you go, leaving only the empty shells of the bots who got in your path. In the wild only the smartest bots survive... The choice is yours really. My goal is to have enough narrative to support a full introduction and a solid set of objectives for the beginning and intermediate play levels, yet be able to fade out in the middle in favor of more pvp rts/3rd/1st person play, and then when the player has proved their dominance, provide a subtle yet powerful kind of closure to the main story arc without concluding the game. Well, how does it sound to you? I think I'm starting to feel it..
  19. Here are the photos of the hallway for our game. In this part, there will be two hallways; one is with the obstacles, and the other one will be the same hallway without obstacles. Players will use a conveyor belt to cross the hallway. Our aim is for players to test the ownership and agency. For the current version of the game, we are planning to connect the hallways to the escape pod and the equipment room. It is expected from the player to pass these hallways at each time. According to their avatars such as an armoured body or an alien, we are expecting to see how the player will dodge the obstacles depending on their avatar. Obstacle-wise, there will be broken pipes, electrical wires and hot steam to be added to the model.
  20. Mitja Prelovsek

    Alpha Blending Unreal Engine 4 with Lightact

    Do you want to combine Unreal Engine's content with other content in Lightact media server? Sit back and watch this 4 min tutorial to learn how: Alpha Blending Unreal Engine 4 with Lightact:
  21. Mitja Prelovsek

    Alpha Blending Unreal Engine 4 with Lightact

    Do you want to combine Unreal Engine's content with other content in Lightact media server? Sit back and watch this 4 min tutorial to learn how: Alpha Blending Unreal Engine 4 with Lightact: View full story
  22. Well here it is, and finally in a format even I understand. And then, keeping the above in mind, here's how the NPCs will work. So, yeah, there it is... Enjoy.
  23. Kjell Andersson

    Design Genifect 2.0 OpenFX plugin

    Genifect 2.0 OpenFX plugin has been released by Dual Heights Software. New in 2.0 is the Materialized Bevel filter which creates bevel and lighting effects for texts and symbols. Using MatCap textures you can create advanced and realistic lighting effects on 2D-text and logos to make it look like it was made out of gold, copper or any other material that you can find a MatCap texture for on the Internet. Genifect is an OpenFX plugin that works with the major compositing software for video and animation including Nuke, DaVinci Resolve/Fusion, Vegas Pro and Natron to name a few. Visit the official Genifect page to learn more: https://www.dualheights.se/genifect/ View full story
  24. Kjell Andersson

    Design Genifect 2.0 OpenFX plugin

    Genifect 2.0 OpenFX plugin has been released by Dual Heights Software. New in 2.0 is the Materialized Bevel filter which creates bevel and lighting effects for texts and symbols. Using MatCap textures you can create advanced and realistic lighting effects on 2D-text and logos to make it look like it was made out of gold, copper or any other material that you can find a MatCap texture for on the Internet. Genifect is an OpenFX plugin that works with the major compositing software for video and animation including Nuke, DaVinci Resolve/Fusion, Vegas Pro and Natron to name a few. Visit the official Genifect page to learn more: https://www.dualheights.se/genifect/
  25. jb-dev

    A loading screen

    From the album: Vaporwave Roguelite

    This is how loading screens will look like. I still have no idea whenever or not I could show things like tips or anything alike...
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