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Found 95 results

  1. Looking for school to attend

    Hi I’m looking for a school to attend for game development and design online. i have a large interest in wanting to learn game development and programming and design but I don’t have the time or schools close enough to me for an on campus education since my current job has me travel rather often all over the country. id prefer one without liberal arts and get right into the core aspects of the major but it seems most schools love them way too much right now. if anyone has any suggestions for schools to look into that would allow me to get my bachelors and be able to possibly find a job in the field please let me know
  2. Hello all! I'm new to the forum and I'm glad to have found a lot of interesting discussions/topics! Quick intro, I'm currently in school for Independent (indie) Video Game Design, on my last semester and the job search will start in less than 4 months (I'm nervous to say the least). I've learned a lot in school and I'm proud to say that I can make a decent game independently and market it properly. The problem is that I can do all of this, but I don't specialise in anything specific. I'm pretty good at modeling (but definitely not a pro, can only make simple clean models), okay at scripting, design isn't my strength but a big interest and I'm pretty okay at UI/UX but definitely not proficient at all. I can't say I specialise in any of the above fields and I know that specialising in something is important in order to have a consistent portfolio and finding a job. Should I focus on specialising on a specific field in the next 4 months (practice 24/7) in order to sell myself to employers or should I practice everything and sell myself as a Jack-of-all-trades? I really want to get a designer job as I enjoy writing GDDs and discussing design during Pre-Production but my Rational Design knowledge is weak and I've never been considered a designer in all my previous projects (always was responsible for art or UI).
  3. Game Programming Resources

    Game Programming Resources Rodrigo Monteiro, who has been making games for twenty years now, started a thread on Twitter for sharing his favorite game programming resources. I then collected those and a few responses and indexed them into a Twitter moment here: Here’s what was in the thread: Game Networking: https://gafferongames.com/categories/game-networking/ Development and Deployment of Multiplayer Online Games by IT Hare / No Bugs’ Hare is a multiplayer game programming resource split into nine volumes; the first of which is available here on Amazon. Linear Algebra: Geometry – Separating Axis Theorem (for collision detection): http://www.metanetsoftware.com/technique/tutorialA.html How to implement 2D platformer games: http://higherorderfun.com/blog/2012/05/20/the-guide-to-implementing-2d-platformers/ Pathfinding: https://www.redblobgames.com/pathfinding/a-star/introduction.html OpenGL Tutorial: https://learnopengl.com/ Audio Programming: https://jackschaedler.github.io/circles-sines-signals/index.html OpenAL Effects Extension Guide (for game audio): http://kcat.strangesoft.net/misc-downloads/Effects%20Extension%20Guide.pdf Entity Component Systems provide an alternative to object-oriented programming. Entity Systems are the future of MMOG development: http://t-machine.org/index.php/2007/09/03/entity-systems-are-the-future-of-mmog-development-part-1/ What is an entity system framework for game development? http://www.richardlord.net/blog/ecs/what-is-an-entity-framework.html Understanding Component-Entity-Systems: https://www.gamedev.net/articles/programming/general-and-gameplay-programming/understanding-component-entity-systems-r3013/ Alan Zucconi blogs about shaders and game math for developers on his site: https://www.alanzucconi.com/tutorials/ AI Steering Behaviours: http://www.red3d.com/cwr/boids/ Bartosz Olszewski blogs about game programming here: gamesarchitecture.com How to write a shader to scale pixel art: https://colececil.io/blog/2017/scaling-pixel-art-without-destroying-it/ Here’s podcast on C++ programming: http://cppcast.com/archives/ http://gameprogrammingpatterns.com/ Note: This post was originally published on my blog as game programming resources.
  4. tldr: This is a community project to help aspiring solo game developers and designers, through small assignment projects, gain the knowledge and skills required to make a video game. If you are interested in contributing to the discussion, head to https://github.com/Neoflash1979/learn-gamedev/issues. The problem with tutorials With the number of great courses, tutorials and other learning resources found online, more and more people teach themselves programming. Many will do so with the intent of making video games. But there is much more to designing and making video games than mere programming. Animation, anthropology, architecture, brainstorming, business, cinematography, communication, creative writing, economics, engineering, games, history, management, mathematics, music, psychology, public speaking, sound design, technical writing, visual arts AND programming; knowledge and skills in these areas can be invaluable to a game designer/developer. Thankfully, there is an abundance of resources available online that can help one acquire knowledge and skills in each of these areas individually. But for the aspiring solo dev, it’s not just a matter of acquiring knowledge in these areas, it’s also important to understand how to use all of that together, for the express purpose of making a video game. There is a plethora of tutorials available online that will guide you from A to Z on how to make such or such a game. In the process you will acquire a certain amount of technical knowledge, and that’s great. But you won’t really learn about the process of designing and developing a video game. The same can be said about the numerous lists that tells you the type of games you should be making, and in what order, in order to learn gaming making; first you make a Breakout clone, then you make a Tetris clone, then you make a Mario clone, then you make Wolfenstein 3D clone, etc. Again, this kind of advice will help you progress in certain technical skills, but you won’t have learned all that much about the process of designing and developing a video game. Making a video game is about making decisions. When you follow tutorials, or clone an existing game, the decisions are largely already made for you. To really learn to design and develop video games, you have to build them, from scratch, on your own (or with a friend or two). All aspiring game dev/designer realizes this at some point and so sets out to build their first game. Their REAL first game. One where THEY have to decide, design and build EVERYTHING. And that’s where everything goes to sh*t. Making video games is hard You see, making a video game is hard. I mean, REALLY making a game, from scratch. It is a daunting task and it can be overwhelming. So naturally, you turn to Google, and you learn expressions like “scope”, “minimum viable product”, “rapid prototyping”, “find the fun” and “start small”. All those two minutes videos and articles are very enlightening but in the end, it’s still very hard to understand how to keep a small scope when you have never REALLY made a game and you are invariably imbued with grand game-making aspirations. How small is small? What aspects of game making should I focus on? How many hours should I invest in making that first game? Those are just a few of the questions that an aspiring game dev/designer might have. Despite all the great resources out there for learning all the bits and pieces involved in designing and making a game, there is a complete void in terms of helping aspiring dev learning to put it all together in a progressive, manageable, way. What we, aspiring self-taught devs, are missing is a guide. Something that will guide us, progressively, on our game making path. Something that will help us focus on the right things, at the right time, while we progress on our learning journey – “yeah, maybe you should leave researching the use of Octrees in collision avoidance AI for later and first focus on figuring out how to make that white ball go from point A to point B, Phil”. What we really need are assignments, with deadlines and requirements. Oddly enough, if your Google “game making assignments” you will find a few examples of exactly what we need, but only for board games, or children Phys Ed games. Here is an example: http://www.cobblearning.net/kentblog/files/2015/11/Project-27w5me1.pdf This is exactly what we need. Exercises that help us focus our creativity and give us a set of guidelines, requirements and constraints. Allowing us to make MOST or at least MANY of the creative and technical decisions that go into making a game, while at the same time ensuring that we keep the scope small and that we focus on a few new concepts/skills. Every assignment would, gradually, expose the learner to new and more advanced concepts/skills, expanding the scope a little, culminating in a final, 2 to 6-month-long assignment where the learner is really making a game he can be proud of and call his own. Alas, this resource does not exist. At least I have found it. So, let’s do something about it. I propose that we create an open-source project on Github and create a “Game development and design self-education” curriculum. Basically, a list of game making assignments that would guide an aspiring game dev through the process of learning the required skills, methods and processes required to put a game together. The onus would be on the aspiring game dev to find the resources needed to learn the creative and technical skills required to meet each assignment’s requirements. If you are interested in contributing to the discussion, head to https://github.com/Neoflash1979/learn-gamedev/issues.
  5. Good Game Development Literature?

    Hi GameDevs :), I am searching for good educational material regarding game development. You know any good books, ebook, articles about this topic? I am searching for information that this more of a general nature, so nothing like how to code this or that in c++. Or how to create an UI in Unity. What I am searching for is information about how you generaly set up an good UI, what coding principles have proven, what conventions are there, or what you should pay attention to when building game enviorments. I am also interested how to set up an good AI. Best would be if the topics are pointed towards 3D & first person. I already have quiet some knwoledge, but would like to compare it with what is out there and so grow my skill and knowledge. I know its a lot, but as I am interested in the subject as a whole I need it all :). I would prefer material you can read, but you can also post links to video courses, youtube tutorials etc and in can be both, paid and free content. Thank you in advance, you would do me a great favor by posting your findings, as I found some material already, but am unsure about the qualtiy of this stuff... Markus from Phodex
  6. Hello everybody, I hope you all got a good start into the new year! I am starting this thread because I would like to get in touch with some of you who are currently working in the game industry as designers or developers. A little background: I am currently finishing up my PhD in Psychology, but discovered lately that the path of going on into science might not be for me. Game have always fascinated me, both from a technical as well as theoretical (psychological?) standpoint, so naturally our career advisor suggested getting more information. I am not very adept at general programming (except for a lot of R, and a bit of Unity), but confident I could teach myself what I need to know. What is more important to me however is getting a clearer idea about what the daily tasks can look like, and whether I would fit the work environment. I generally discovered about myself that I like to solve "concrete" puzzles (e.g. at the moment this could mean writing out and testing the syntax for a statistical problem) or finding new approaches to some existing questions (e.g. in academia this could coming up with the idea to be using a novel method to examine a question from a different angle). I noticed that I am not very happy when working under VERY uncertain circumstances (e.g. having no idea where the task is going, what the status of completion is, or what is expected from me to do a good job, as in endless revisions of an article) or very tedious detail work (e.g. the final, final stages of writing up an paper, checking for typos etc.). I see myself as this kind of this 'mid-level' guys of solving a task, that brings in new ideas and solves problems in a well-described environment, but doesnt necessarily finalize everything. Now my question would be to the people working in the industry (I realize that some of these can vary greatly with different jobs): In your daily work life, do you feel like you are being stimulated with new task frequently, or do you mainly work on similar tasks? Do you feel like you have the possibility to innovate and bring in new ideas in your job / task? Do you feel that, for the most part, your position has clearly described activities, or are you mainly taking on various roles that are currently needed? Do you get a lot of feedback on performance or progress? Or is your work mainly done 'when its done'? I would be very thankful to anybody willing to share some of their experiences. I tried looking for other topis on this, and found some good overviews, but these focused more on the technical aspects (what language to learn first, where to look for jobs). This didnt feel very applicable to my personal situation, so I thought I'd give it a shot myself. Thank you all for reading through this novel, happy 2018! Best, Alex
  7. Sorry if this becomes a wall of text, or if this was in the wrong section but I think this was the right place for this. I just created an account but I have been around on the forums for a bit but could really use some advice now. I just graduated from Cuyahoga Community College (Tri-C) and got my Associates of Applied Business - Programming and Development. Now I'm faced with the decision of do I see what I can do with an Associates or should I go to another college to get my Bachelors? I currently work as an Intern at a company that my mom works, I have been there for about a year and a half but I don't really plan on staying there for long and in fact kind of wanting to leave soon after I find out what I should do. I don't do anything big but I do help test the applications that the programmers work on and can help them fix small bugs, and I have learned a lot while working there but most likely will just use that for work experience. I mainly want to get into Indie game development which technically wouldn't need a really high degree but for just knowledge (at least I think so) but at the same time, going to college and getting my Bachelors might be the smarter choice as then I'll have a degree to fall back on and could try to work for a company if Indie development wasn't working. However, my issue is that I don't drive, nor do I really have any desire to so I would be limited to what I can reach with a Bus route (Tri-C was on a nearby bus route) or take the rapid downtown and could go to Cleveland State University (CSU) which probably would be my choice for college if I wanted to go back to college for a higher degree. The problem with that is CSU doesn't have much for the programming language I want to get into which is C++, from what I saw they only had 1 C++ class and it's probably the intro to C++ or something like that which Tri-C also had that same class and I already took it there. I don't really want to go to CSU and take all these random classes that has nothing to do with programming and the classes that are based on programming are probably classes on Java (just like Tri-C), so I'm hesitant on wanting to go and have to take out student loans and be in debt and not even get knowledge of the programming language I wanted to learn in the first place. Which is why I was wondering if it's a better idea to just not go back to school but look up a lot of guides, buy programming books, and try to teach myself and gain the experience that way as I did mostly want to get into Indie development anyways. I could then focus on the languages that interests me like C++ and other important languages to know like SQL and HTML/PhP. Online schools are an option as well, and might end up being a better option for my situation. I just don't know much about Online based colleges, and never really liked online classes at Tri-C but if its the best option for me and offers way more programming classes then I can give a look into them. Any advice? If you were in my situation, what would you do?
  8. Hello future and present game designers! I've researched into this topic and even had an interview with a well-known composer about whether I should attend a music school. Acquiring the knowledge, contacts, and confidence in music makes attending one seem like a good choice. Also, would my school of choice matter in this decision? In my case, the University of Southern California is the more accredited school for video game designers, but the University of Irvine is closer to home (where I won't have to move away). Any advice is appreciated. Thanks.
  9. I am programming boolean operations on 3D meshes which are described by sphere trees. They do not deform, nor change in time anyhow. However to generate the environments I need to perform boolean operations on them as fast as possible. I need to find all the collisions between polygons (triangles). What is the best approach / algorithm for that purpose? I haven't found anything particularly useful via Google. In detail: I am in need for an algorithm that will take two sphere trees and return the buffer of all collisions. I do not have much experience in using sphere trees so my idea is to check every polygon from the first mesh with the second mesh sphere tree and vice versa. Somehow I feel that is a waste of CPU power. Could anyone give me a description of better approach or some useful links?
  10. Hi Gamedevs, I am intensively doing game development for more than two years now and I have met a lot of people having trouble getting started and especially with coding. I really would like to come up with something, helping those of you having difficulties and getting started with game development and coding (especially if you are doing it on your own or with a small team), to later be able to set reasonable goals and achieve those goals. I exactly know how frustrating it can be, because I went to the same painful process. Therefore I quickly created a google survey, to be able to suit the content to your needs. If you have a tiny bit of time and would like to see content related to this topic, I would be happy if you would participate . Have a nice day! Markus from Phodex [My introduction thread] -> To the survey <-
  11. Hey everyone, I recently signed up for this forum because I'm in a pickle and I hope you can help me. Long story short, I decided that it's about time I follow my gut and start learning game programming. However, I don't want to start with the "wrong" foot and create unnecessary barriers. Therefore I would like to know which online university is the best one for me to study. It has to be online because I live in Israel. I'm looking for an university that is accredited, with a decent teaching core and of course with good market acceptance! From my research, I narrowed it down to these 4: - Full Sail University - Academy of Art University - Liberty University - Southern New Hampshire University Are any of these decent? Would you choose one of them or suggest something else? Thanks a lot! Ronny
  12. Design Prioritisation

    The design team initially proposed that we use the spaceship as the central HUB world for the player to return to after a mission’s closure, with this decision unanimous, we began to work chronologically into the game. On the contrary to regular practice and due to inexperience, we began working on the players introduction to the game and tutorial first, before turning our attention to the roguelike elements required, as per the brief. Much of the design work that the team and I worked on was based around the level design of the HUB world and the narrative that could be construed through onboarding. Due to the focus in this area, the main game suffered inattention. Systematically speaking, once the scripts were working in the HUB world, they were supposed to translate smoothly into the level generation there after. Unfortunately this did not go as planned and by the time our attentions had turned to the procedural generation, serious system issues began to highlight themselves. I believe that if we had have worked solely on the procedural generation first to meet the brief requirements and then worked backwards, creating the HUB world then the tutorial, we would have a product that is much more compatible with the brief. As I venture into other projects, this lesson learned in prioritising, I feel is the most important one that I will carry with me to ensure this issue is not repeated in future endeavors.
  13. Scope

    After getting the green light on the Colony 7 pitch, we entered pre production with a grand scheme that was very large in scope, but seemed achievable at the time. As production went on, hurdles were encountered with various technical aspects of the games functionality which slowed down the production itself. While technical hurdles are mostly common in all projects, it soon became a realisation that the team had not taken into consideration the potential for these hurdles to arise when defining the scope against deadlines. The effect this had on production was that with each hurdle encountered, that may have taken a day or possibly two to fix, we were losing time to implement the various other systems. In the weeks leading up to the feature complete deadline, to resolve this issue, we had to make extreme cuts to content that we had run out of time to implement. This meant that we had to cut our first level, which caused disappointment among the team. On the back of this, when weekly sprints were consistently not being met, it allowed for deflation to seep within the ranks as there was seemingly a lack of progress. Moving forward, I’ve learnt that setting an achievable scope is highly important so that the team are being given realistic goals, this not only avoids disappointment but it also avoids loss of motivation within the team. The process of making a game can be turned into one itself by setting smaller, more achievable goals for designers and programmers to hit and be rewarded with the fun and positivity we look to install in our players.
  14. Colour Pallets

    In the early stages of design the team failed to outline a clear and concise colour palette to work within. Essentially this allowed for each member of the design team to interpret the in game environments however they wished, it also meant that during the phase of asset creation, the assets were inconsistent and often contrasting. It was only when the assets had come together that this was realised and the team addressed it immediately, focusing on steel greys for the structure of the HUB world with touches of blue to compliment the Colonists uniform. At this point however, it meant creating new renditions of the assets that work in unison of each other. Mainly it was minor issues that were easily fixable such as panel details or table top colours, however one area in particular was quite problematic. When I designed the Volcanic environment, I had a significantly different idea to the other designers, this resulted in spending several hours editing the colour schemes instead of focusing on other work that had to be done at that time. Luckily not too much backtracking had to be done as the problem was identified early enough due to constant asset implementation and testing. Looking back at the plans whilst in pre-production, the colour palette was an obvious and high priority specification that just became lost in translation during the design prep. This particular problem has taught me how crucial it is to outline this early on to ensure designers are working towards a shared vision at all times, it also allows constant re-visitation during the project for guidelines.
  15. Modular Asset Kits

    Having never dived into the world of modular asset creation before, I decided to do some research into how artists and level designers work within this area. The GDC Vault has a great talk on this topic called ‘Fallout 4’s Modular Level Design’ (Linked below), it definitely helped navigate me towards the right direction, albeit there were mistakes I had to uncover for myself to truly know what the benefits of going modular were. Within the first round of assets that I had created, the problems started to highlight themselves. I had created a door asset that suggested it lead to the bridge, except the bridge was going to remain locked. When the level design was updated and we needed the bridge, it meant the doors were unusable because they needed to be able to open. Ultimately this meant redesigning the asset to animate and fit on the pro grid correctly. Original Door: Updated Door: The issue that this highlighted for my work practice, was that when layout changes were made for functionality reasons, the models I was making were inflexible, they were not singular enough to be manipulated to compliment the change and thus they quickly became redundant. At first I had to spend a considerable amount of time chasing my own tail, so to speak, correcting and editing the assets to fit into the updates. Nevertheless once they were updated and snapped together without clipping issues, it was understandable that if I had made them as singular units from the very start, I would not have wasted precious development hours. Moving forward, with asset creation and level design, I know that the more modular the assets are, the more malleable and reusable they are with unforeseen design changes. You can find the very informative GDC talk, surrounding modular level kits, by clicking this link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QBAM27YbKZg
  16. Game School Online™ Announces Winter Enrollment Open Through December Los Angeles, CA - December 2017 Free Winter Term Enrollment! Free Winter Enrollment: Game School Online™, the first and only free online game development school of its kind, has opened enrollment for the winter term, which begins in January of 2018. GSO™ currently offers curricula in environment art and lighting for games, focusing specifically on Unreal Engine 4. GSO™ will be adding two new courses for the winter term, “Advanced Lighting Concepts with Unreal Engine 4” and “Advanced Hard Surface Modeling.” Free Workshop! December Free Workshop: In addition to winter enrollment, GSO™ will have a free online workshop, “Animating For Games and Movies”, with Veara Suon, Senior Animator at Double Negative. Veara has worked in the AAA games industry, working on franchises like Destiny and Bioshock. Veara also works in the film industry, having worked for famed studios like Weta, ILM, and Sony, contributing to films like Pacific Rim 2, Spiderman, and Avengers. In this month’s free GSO™ workshop, Veara will be discussing topics such as: Sharing techniques on how he animates for games and film Advice on how students can get a job in games or film Advice on how working professionals can switch from games to film, and vice versa Job relocation The workshop will last for an hour, with allocated time for Q & A from the audience. The workshop will take place on December 14 at 8pm PST. As usual, our monthly workshops are absolutely free and anyone is welcomed to join us. To RSVP, please visit our Facebook page here: https://www.facebook.com/events/139461393377301/?active_tab=about Scholars Available For Mentoring! Scholar Lineup: Scholars are our mentors, working industry professionals currently working on your favorite games and franchises- here to help you learn to be a professional game dev, with one on one live private sessions. Our current lineup of scholars includes: Brian Yam - Director of Visual Development @ Section Studios https://bdyammer.artstation.com/ https://www.linkedin.com/in/yambrian/ Olaf Piesche - Senior Engineer @ Epic Games https://www.linkedin.com/in/olaf-piesche-0938292/ Kevin DeBolt - World Artist @ 343 Industries http://kevindebolt.com/index.html https://www.linkedin.com/in/kevin-debolt-52058844/ Rosie Katz - Senior Game Designer @ EA, Visceral, Sledgehammer Games http://www.rosiewrede.com/index.php?nav_bar=level_design https://www.linkedin.com/in/rosiewrede/ Leo Gonzalez - Senior Artist @ Certain Affinity https://leog.artstation.com/ https://www.linkedin.com/in/leo-g/ Brandon Pham - Lead Environment Artist https://brandonpham.artstation.com/ https://www.linkedin.com/in/brandon-pham-a490497/ We believe that education should be free for everyone! Come join us at Game School Online™ and see what the future of game development education looks like today! For more information about Game School Online™, available courses, scholars, and events, please visit http://gameschoolonline.com/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/gameschoolonline/ Twitter: @GSOscholar Discord: https://discordapp.com/invite/BzU5Fq2 Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/gameschoolonline About Game School Online™ (GSO™) Game School Online™ is the first ever, completely free game development training program. GSO™ was founded by veteran developers working in the AAA games and entertainment industries. Featuring courses authored by working industry professionals, students are able to learn production techniques and workflows used to ship some of the biggest IPs and AAA franchises. Industry pros known as “scholars”, work with students providing private live sessions to help you become “industry” ready. All courses are available for free, no trials or demos- it’s completely free for anyone that wants to learn how to become a skilled game developer. For more information, please visit our website: http://gameschoolonline.com/ Game School Online™ and GSO™ are registered trademarks Game School Online, LLC. All other brand names, product names or trademarks belong to their respective holders. Contact Game School Online, LLC. info@gameschoolonline.com
  17. Game School Online™ Announces Winter Enrollment Open Through December Los Angeles, CA - December 2017 Free Winter Term Enrollment! Free Winter Enrollment: Game School Online™, the first and only free online game development school of its kind, has opened enrollment for the winter term, which begins in January of 2018. GSO™ currently offers curricula in environment art and lighting for games, focusing specifically on Unreal Engine 4. GSO™ will be adding two new courses for the winter term, “Advanced Lighting Concepts with Unreal Engine 4” and “Advanced Hard Surface Modeling.” Free Workshop! December Free Workshop: In addition to winter enrollment, GSO™ will have a free online workshop, “Animating For Games and Movies”, with Veara Suon, Senior Animator at Double Negative. Veara has worked in the AAA games industry, working on franchises like Destiny and Bioshock. Veara also works in the film industry, having worked for famed studios like Weta, ILM, and Sony, contributing to films like Pacific Rim 2, Spiderman, and Avengers. In this month’s free GSO™ workshop, Veara will be discussing topics such as: Sharing techniques on how he animates for games and film Advice on how students can get a job in games or film Advice on how working professionals can switch from games to film, and vice versa Job relocation The workshop will last for an hour, with allocated time for Q & A from the audience. The workshop will take place on December 14 at 8pm PST. As usual, our monthly workshops are absolutely free and anyone is welcomed to join us. To RSVP, please visit our Facebook page here: https://www.facebook.com/events/139461393377301/?active_tab=about Scholars Available For Mentoring! Scholar Lineup: Scholars are our mentors, working industry professionals currently working on your favorite games and franchises- here to help you learn to be a professional game dev, with one on one live private sessions. Our current lineup of scholars includes: Brian Yam - Director of Visual Development @ Section Studios https://bdyammer.artstation.com/ https://www.linkedin.com/in/yambrian/ Olaf Piesche - Senior Engineer @ Epic Games https://www.linkedin.com/in/olaf-piesche-0938292/ Kevin DeBolt - World Artist @ 343 Industries http://kevindebolt.com/index.html https://www.linkedin.com/in/kevin-debolt-52058844/ Rosie Katz - Senior Game Designer @ EA, Visceral, Sledgehammer Games http://www.rosiewrede.com/index.php?nav_bar=level_design https://www.linkedin.com/in/rosiewrede/ Leo Gonzalez - Senior Artist @ Certain Affinity https://leog.artstation.com/ https://www.linkedin.com/in/leo-g/ Brandon Pham - Lead Environment Artist https://brandonpham.artstation.com/ https://www.linkedin.com/in/brandon-pham-a490497/ We believe that education should be free for everyone! Come join us at Game School Online™ and see what the future of game development education looks like today! For more information about Game School Online™, available courses, scholars, and events, please visit http://gameschoolonline.com/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/gameschoolonline/ Twitter: @GSOscholar Discord: https://discordapp.com/invite/BzU5Fq2 Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/gameschoolonline About Game School Online™ (GSO™) Game School Online™ is the first ever, completely free game development training program. GSO™ was founded by veteran developers working in the AAA games and entertainment industries. Featuring courses authored by working industry professionals, students are able to learn production techniques and workflows used to ship some of the biggest IPs and AAA franchises. Industry pros known as “scholars”, work with students providing private live sessions to help you become “industry” ready. All courses are available for free, no trials or demos- it’s completely free for anyone that wants to learn how to become a skilled game developer. For more information, please visit our website: http://gameschoolonline.com/ Game School Online™ and GSO™ are registered trademarks Game School Online, LLC. All other brand names, product names or trademarks belong to their respective holders. Contact Game School Online, LLC. info@gameschoolonline.com View full story
  18. TL;DR: noob non-coding teacher somehow thinks they can build a narrative educational game in WordPress; plz halp how do I games? I'm mostly a teacher with no coding background--I played with teaching myself Java for a bit but couldn't really code anything from scratch. I'm interested in developing (as a hobbyist) an educational game that would be a sort of choice-based narrative branching storyline, a bit like Fallen London/Storynexus. Because it's so storyline based and I don't need crazy 3d animation, I'm considering just building it as a WordPress site with a couple of gamification plug ins to handle inventory and choice consequences. The unique hook is that the game requires (suggests really) that the player accomplish real world building challenges to accomplish your goals. I.e. Your character has to cross a river? Get some popsicle sticks or cardboard or whatever and build a model bridge. Take a photo of your bridge and upload it to your portfolio to continue (and maybe I don't develop this feature right away). I'm in this for three reasons: the educational value for families and teachers, the storyline and world I'm building that I'm super excited about, and the fame and massive wealth (just kidding but it has to have to potential to pay for itself). Before I sink too much of my life into this, I want to know more about what I'll need to do to make it work. Specifically my questions are: 1) I get that WordPress isn't optimal for developing games. But can I do it or will I have to learn a new engine because I can't make do what I want? (And if so, what's a better engine with low-to-no coding prereq that will still allow me to sell my game?) 2) How do I budget for a project like this? (The link to the Reddit post about legal fees was very useful thank you) 3) What are the additional considerations when creating a game like this intended for children with adult supervision? (Obviously privacy, and I need to cover my assets in case some kid takes "go build a bridge!" too literally and gets hurt with mama's table saw in the garage...) 4) Is this not the forum for this since what I'm talking about is something more like educational narrative fiction and certainly not the spectacularly complex and amazing projects you all are working on? Thank you for any and all thoughts.
  19. Unity3D optimisation tutorial

    Hello. A lot of posts was about optimization. But most of them only abstract talks. We made real game scene and provide tutorial on optimizing this scene.
  20. I'm restudying math through khan academy because I believe my level is very low, but I was wondering if it's better to learn only the math necessary to do something at the moment (such as a parabola of a bullet) or to follow through a textbook or site to learn the theory with some practice.
  21. Hi! Ever since I was a kid I was always fascinated by games, I believe we all were and still are. There was a certain mystique while playing a game, something that helped us all in someway. I'll never forget playing the original super Mario bros and then going to super Mario 64 and wanting to collect all the stars just to see Yoshi! This is something I want to replicate, I want to make a game that people will enjoy. I know absolutely nothing about game design and I don't want to come off as ignorant when I say I want to make a large open world game. I understand it may be an insane amount of work, possibly unrealistic/impossible for a small team. But that's what I want to know, if anyone could be real with me and tell me the realistic amount of time, people, and money I would need to make a large open world game. I understand that it being my first game is unrealistic but that's my end goal and I just want to know the specifics of it. I greatly appreciate anyone who gives any tips or information. I'm grateful that such a community exists.
  22. Hi everyone, I know there is a lot of blogs and advice about what to do and not do for a beginner in a game industry, I even read a lot myself to find inspiration and avoid common mistakes. Unfortunately, there is not so many talking about real experiences. I am here to tell the story behind "Soul of Mask", my first game and I hope not my last. I will avoid a long post, so it will be in different blog entries presented like this: - Origins and first difficulties, - Technical: Game engines, programing language, tools - Marketing and conclusion. In all point I'll talk from the beginning to the end of the project, there is no chronology so you are free to read what you want in the order you want. Let start then... My name is Alain Perrin, as you may have noticed, not a native English speaker. I am a system dev in a Chinese company based in China. So yes I live in China for quite many years. I always wanted to create a game but I always stop writing my game as soon as I was satisfied with the technical problem I solved. It was enough for me until my wife (fiance at that time) talked about people proud of themselves without any real achievement. Yes, she didn't realize it but it hit me right in the brain and let say ego as she was not talking about me. "Yes I think I can do a game but I never proved it". It is where I decide to start a game and finish it to prove to myself that I can really do it. This will explain a lot of choices I made for my tools such as Programming languages and game engines. Now we know I never planned to make a commercial game, it was just about to start something bigger than Tetris (I did finish it around 2003, a mixt of ASM and C with class dirty code). I decide Pacman with a lot of improvement in the ghosts. My major was AI and face recognition and I wanted to make Pacman with clever ghosts. But, with time I started to add more and more stuff and the game didn't look like Pacman at all, at least in the gameplay. It was still a mase game but a lot of things were too far from Pacman it is when I decide to stop and think about something else, a real game. I started to look for help; another developer and at least a drawer could be pixel artist or just 2D designer even a comics drawer. It is also when the first problems came. As a developer finding another developer was easy to keep him on the project was another challenge. So you guess, he left. And this brilliant guy leaving was a hard strike to my moral, it was so demoralizing. However, this guy was totally honest and told me: " I am leaving because I don't see where this will go". At first, I thought he was talking about money, he may think this project will not bring any money at all. If it was the case I had no way to convince him to stay. But he was talking about achievement. money is not so important when you do something you want to, money is a reward I would love to sell 1Million copy of "Soul of Mask " but it was not my priority and we shared the same thoughts. The problems were the fact that he didn't believe it will finish one day and didn't want to waste is time. Now another part of my personality took control of my mind over depression. The love of challenge. Now I have a new challenge, everything I need to go back to work. I restarted everything with a better design as now I knew I was not doing Pacman anymore. It is also at that moment I made my first big mistake. I read after that it is a common one " I do all the code and I will find soon or later a graphist". So one year passed when I started "Element mask" and I had this: Element Mask Element mask was supposed to be the full game. It was the story of a young man who has to collect all the masked stollen by demons. It was not so beautiful but I was sure that with a full gameplay and a story I will find someone to draw. I google images and made something different. all images in the following image are downloaded from google image: Here you can on the right bottom your different special power. So I spent almost another year trying to find someone to draw. I contacted my brother in law in France who agreed to help. then I went there, meet him and he realised that is was not 3D game and he could not make 2D graphics assets. So 2 years passed, I have an almost ready gameplay but no graphics. My Brother in law and one of his friend remembered that they have a co-worker that may help. This happened in August 2016. They contact the guy who said OK to meet me the next day. My designer invited me to his place and I was already in love and impressed, this guy is a gamer. He had everything, a lot of games and objects from games of all time. Obviously, if I can convince him then that will be finished. And I did it, he was in. I left France and move back to China, He sent me Emails to show his interest. I let him free to change what he wants in the game as long as I can program it. and he did bring the idea of half mechanic characters. here is his first sketch: Hey guys, honestly it was promising, right? But if you bought "Soul of Mask" today you already guess that it didn't work. How? I don't know myself. This was his last email. After that he disappeared, no news, no answers nada, nothing, keine, rien. As if it was not enough I injured myself playing football (soccer for USA). ACL was torn, for those who play sport they know it is a serious injury. Good can come from Bad. Nine months without sport said the doctor, and at least 2 weeks without moving my right knew. So I had to stay at home and this was the good part. I use to play football 3 times per week plus 2 times of basketball. For almost a year I will have to do something else. Unfortunatly I still had no news from my designer. I decided to go again to France to visit my family and try to contact him again. I did and he said sorry but he didn't have time to work on Element mask. Angry programmer. That was too much. I was very pissed. I nicely said " ok I understand we all have our job and our life. No problem". But inside all was fire ready to burn everything around. August 2016 to February 2017 you cannot find 15 seconds to send me a WhatsApp to tell me you are out of the project? you are busy but me I can just wait and hope? I realized that everything is really relative. I was convinced of total failure if I attempt to make Element Mask alone but I just have the proof of the opposite: I would have to work alone if I want it to finish one day. I just remember a funny fact, I can draw myself. I used to draw comics for my classmate when I was in middle school. I bought my watcom and started again. My level is far from what I could do but it was enough for buyer to accept it. actually no body said my game was ugly: Rip Element mask My problem now was different. I had nobody to wait but I was not fast to draw as I was before. Worse, I cannot draw what my code is made fore. So gameplay changed a lot. Every time I failed to draw something, the gameplay will change. This is for example how I moved from a character wearing a mask to bouncing masks. Soul of Mask was born. It was something I could finish before the end of 2017 and I did it. I learn a lot about people, life and myself in this adventure. next blog entry will talk about the coding part. thanks for reading.
  23. Advice for education

    Hi folks! I'm trying to set the "correct" path for the game education of a young girl (12). I work under the Scratch environment but she is reaching its limits, so it's better to find a new challenge. What do you think to be the best advice? If there is too few details or so, please give indications about that in order to receive thorougly responses. Example: she has almost zero knowledge about Java and nothing about other languages. But good news are she is relatively fluent with Python. So, my first idea was to get into the Pygame world to take advantage of her present knowledge rather than starting from zero in another environment. Thanks for your replies!
  24. New Here So...HI all

    Hey all im Norvik i really like games but recently want to create them yes i know it takes a lot of people to make a single game but right now im just focusing on the 3d aspect of it i tried c# i kinda understood a bit of it but it didnt catch my attention right now im doing 3d work in Blender and later on i would like to at least prototype my ideas into Unity the thing is i think i hate coding and the other day i saw something called Uscript (visual Scripting) can someone tell me if thats a good way to go ?
  25. Hello all, We are a small team that would like to introduce our game - “Bondo 2 - Fusion of Domino”. It's "merging game" with levels. The testing phase there were many questions. We are would like to hear constructive reaction about Tutorial of our game: very detailed or no, very long or ... etc. We would be happy for any feedback. Thanks! iOS: https://itunes.apple.com/app/id1288081600
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