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Found 70 results

  1. Hello guys, I just registered this site and heard from my lecturer that this a good site to talk about certain topics since my research topic are mostly programmer who are experienced with AI can answer the survey. The reason of the survey below is to understand which is suitable solution for 2d platformer pathfinding for AI and which one is easier to implement for 2D platformer. I would appreciate if you guys give your responses for the survey link shared and thank you for spending time answering the survey. Sorry if the survey is a bit hard to understand, I tried to make it understandable as best as I can. Again, thank you! https://goo.gl/forms/S0etAlAAHL6S5kTI2
  2. Hello, I am a 17 year old app developer and honestly, I'm disappointed with our current education system. Thus, I decided to make a game out of it called "Back to School: Prison Edition". A little background about my app, the goal is to dodge books and rack as many points possible by staying in motion and catching fidget spinners. Yes, you read that right. A fidget spinner is worth 10 points. -------------------------------- School is like a prison. In fact, I've even added some prison elements to my game to express this. For instance, the main character is in jail clothes. Within the game you'll find handcuffs, and assortments which contribute to a prison-like environment. But at the end of the day, it's a really fun, satirical game based on a real life issue. It's available on both Android and IOS App Stores. https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.iwinner.ihateschool https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/back-to-school-prison-edition/id1294114365?mt=8 I'm hoping to get exposure on the matter and my app. I've spent countless Friday nights working on it, fixing bugs, drawing, and uploading to the App Store with certificates. This is by far my greatest feat in life which I only accomplished through envisioning, determination, and self-discipline to remain focused. Education isn't talked about much and it seems like everyone goes with what's given instead of questioning it.Thank you so much, I appreciate your time.
  3. Need an Interview

    Hey I am writing a research paper on why games are considered art. I need a couple of interviews with game designers to get their perspective. Anyone know some designers that would be available to take 5 or 6 questions?
  4. Hi, I'm Lens of Truth and it's time for a Halloween special! I released a new video for my YouTube channel about game design. This one is all about Metroidvania-styled Castlevania game, which unlock bonus playable characters after you beat them. If you could check it out, that'd be awesome! I'd also love to know what you think. Here's my video, Bonus Playable Characters in Castlevania Games.
  5. Hi, I'm Lens of Truth and I released a second video for my YouTube channel about game design. This is the first in a series all about ideas for making a great Power Rangers game. If you could check it out, that'd be awesome! I'd also love to know what you think. Here's my video, When to Morph.
  6. Hey, Im new to game development and I was wondering what thoughts were on youtube tutorials, courses on udemy or similar? Thanks C
  7. I know of one really good YouTube channel that's all about game design. It's simply called Mark Brown, and he does two different series: Game Makers' Toolkit and Boss Keys. It's a great place for game designers to go and just pick up ideas. He's not really about entertainment, although the videos certainly aren't boring, but more about education. As in, how do existing games do clever things to stand out from other games? I myself created a YouTube channel with the intent of talking about game design, although I only have one video as of posting (working on the second). Are there any other really good channels like Mark Brown? I've seen other channels with the same intent, but lacking on the execution. Here's my video below.
  8. We are Anti Gravity Game Studios, an indie game developer based in Hong Kong. We joined the Moscow white nights 2017 on 10-11 October and would like to share some experience about this event. The venue is situated in Congress Park, right beside the Radisson Royal hotel (looks nice and standout, so it is super easy to locate). The actual layout is one big rectangle hall with the indie developer at the exterior wall surrounding the larger sponsors. There is another indie area which is separated out near the entrance. Initially, we thought the position is poor, but after talking to other indie developers in the main hall, we have concluded that the overall population attending is not that high. I would like to point out the attendee of this event, mostly are mobile ads/traffic redirection company, where they are looking for clients to buy their PR packages or place their ads in your game. The second-most is localization companies, then the indie developers. The booth is small, of course, we know it beforehand. The booth is 1m x 1.5m wall, which comes with two chairs, a cocktail table, wifi, and electrical outlet. To be honest, to showcase a mobile game/ console game, just bring 1 set of them. For VR booth, you will get a larger booth, 1m x 3m (width), but to be honest, at most there will be around 10 - 15 people try out your game throughout two days. Therefore if you are a VR developer and have to travel far to set-up, I would greatly greatly recommend you NOT to come, unless you live in Moscow and coming over is easy. The cost makes sense, as the booth is free, only expense will be your traveling cost, buying the pass and the cost of printing your poster and business card. So think ahead what you want to achieve before coming. For the indie pass, it cost 125 USD, and if you are exhibiting, you get a 15% discount. For a regular pass, it's 250USD, and premium should be around 375 USD (able to attend the after and pre-party) About the lectures, they are not that interesting for the year 2017, as there are more online GDC lectures nowadays, attending just for the talks isn't worth the price. It is quite crowded throughout the first day, but the population drops dramatically on the second day like 40% left, and many indie-developer did not set-up their booth or even left early. At last, there is a 2meet system where you can schedule a time to meet developers/anyone; this is a handy tool to reach other related people, do utilize it! In conclusion, it is worth coming to see the event, and the booth is free, so if you happen to be in Moscow, or decided to go anyway, you can set-up a booth and see if you can get anything out from it. The overall impression of this event isn't great as little international company was here, mostly local Russian companies, so the variety of people you can meet are limited. The up-side is there are free champagne, food, and drinks
  9. Student Project Interview

    Hello, I am computer science student who has been assigned a career research project that requires an interview from a professional. If a veteran game designer can spare the time for a few questions, I would be honored. An interview would focus on the effects of new technology within the industry, the skill-sets utilized in game development, and the pathways to a successful career. Skype would be the preferred method, but discord, email, or this forum are fine as well. Post below if interested or if you need additional information.
  10. I wrote a 3D Physics Engine in C++ that uses GJK, EPA, and a Sequential Constraint Solver. I wrote it with two goals in mind: Stacking blocks - it's stable at around 200, and a lot of fun to watch when they all fall down Education - I wanted to create a Physics Engine I could write about to help other people learn. Point #2 is why I'm sharing today. I've written 11 posts that aim to teach the Physics Engine. I start from the beginning, Points and Vectors in 3D, and move up to the GJK algorithm for collision detection. There's a lot more I could cover, but I thought I'd share what I have so far to see if anyone is interested. The engine itself is on github: https://github.com/SaintDubious/DubiousEngine And the articles are on my website: http://dubiousoft.com/2017/01/23/dubious-engine-table-of-contents/ If anyone is interested in learning how to make a Physics Engine, I hope you'll find this useful. I'd greatly appreciate feedback, discussion, questions, corrections, etc. Thanks.
  11. Hi I'm a diploma student that graduated from Singapore. Going over my choices for university/college, other then the ones in Singapore, I am applying for both Digipen's RTIS and CMU's Master's in Entertainment Technology, both in USA. (I graduated from, http://www.nyp.edu.sg/schools/sidm/full-time-courses/game-development-and-technology.html , notice at the bottom that it says I can have direct entry to the Master's at CMU) Part of my research, is to know the benefits and demerits of going to either. Unfortunately, I have not found many places that details CMU's MET course in detail, and from what I see on its website it seems to be a much more, higher level topic that goes beyond programming. My main concern is that I am not skilled enough for the Master's at CMU. While I am confident in my C++ (used it for around 4 years), I am not confident enough to say that I can create a Game Engine myself (given infinite time). Given that I am not a US citizen but I want to work in the US, I'm not sure if a Master's is very helpful compared to Digipen's network and exposure. Digipen's Bachelor Degree in RTIS seems to fit my bill as it allows me to breakthrough to the industry while setting up my foundations properly. What I'm looking for is advice as well as determining which is more suited for me. A bit more about me, I'm generally more interested in actual programming rather then the game design or the game itself. Being able to efficiently optimize an algorithm or having a clever solution to a programming issue, for now, gives me more highs then balancing a delicate game. I'm currently serving my National Service (compulsory uniformed service) and am finishing it next year. So while I have already secured a placement in Digipen Singapore, I would like to look into the US since I do believe more opportunities lay there. Also, 2 years at CMU compared to 4 years at Digipen.....
  12. So I've been reading about and watching videos about Smalltalk. It seems like an interesting language and damn near the Father (or Godfather) of all things OOP. But it got me thinking, what languages should a programmer know or even be proficient in to be a dependable programmer (couldn't think of a better word than "dependable")? After giving it some thought, I came up with this list. At least 1 programming language from: Lisp family of languages ML family of languages Smalltalk family of languages And also the C programming language (not the family, just the language). I think this covers all facets of programming and ways of tackling problems. I don't think there's any other language, thinking most of the modern languages, that has done anything that 4 listed above haven't already done. I'm not counting languages like Julia, R, Perl, or Erlang, because they are languages, AFAIK, that seem to solve a very specific problem. They can be general purpose, but again, AFAIK, they're not meant to be. Of course, agreements, disagreements, thorough takedowns, and/or overall discussion are welcomed.
  13. Hi, my name is Alex Mars from sound design studio AK Audio. I am making sounds for the very interesting game that is a tower defense style. The game is about a fantasy world with magical creatures such as Golems, Gryphons, zombies, yetis and so on. I need to create an attack, spawn, and death sound for each creature. Most of the time I needed to record sounds with my voice. My voice mostly suits the sound for a gnome or an elf but not really for a huge angry creature. Yet every character sound is used with my processed voice. Another example of using Dehumaniser when making sound design for character called Wyvern. Hope you liked this tutorial. Please let me know if you have any questions.
  14. Dear Aussie game developers, Come join us for a night of engaging talks on how the gaming industry has evolved in the last 30 years and what you can learn about working with SVG formats for your technical documentation. Wargaming Sydney will be hosting its first joint Meetup, where game developers can mingle and meet with those who can help shed some light on how to manage your technical documentation. There will be plenty of developers to network and converse with. This is a great opportunity in your games career development! Pizzas and drinks are provided by us. We hope to see you here!
  15. While not typical GameDev.net news material, we felt GamerGate has had enough of an impact on the games industry and on indie developers that it's worth sharing. Zoe Quinn is the indie game developer at the center of GamerGate, and now her story is coming out in her own words through her book Crash Override: How Gamergate (Nearly) Destroyed My Life, and How We Can Win the Fight Against Online Hate. The book was published last week and is now a #1 Best Seller. Crash Override tells the story of GamerGate, which started as a hate campaign directed at her but ended up turning into an attack on women and race. Polygon has posted a review of the book, which we recommend viewing if you're interested in learning more. You can get to the review here. From the Polygon review: You can also purchase the book from Amazon by clicking here. Disclosure: Links to the book on Amazon are GameDev.net affiliate links. You are supporting GameDev.net if you purchase the book through these links. View full story
  16. While not typical GameDev.net news material, we felt GamerGate has had enough of an impact on the games industry and on indie developers that it's worth sharing. Zoe Quinn is the indie game developer at the center of GamerGate, and now her story is coming out in her own words through her book Crash Override: How Gamergate (Nearly) Destroyed My Life, and How We Can Win the Fight Against Online Hate. The book was published last week and is now a #1 Best Seller. Crash Override tells the story of GamerGate, which started as a hate campaign directed at her but ended up turning into an attack on women and race. Polygon has posted a review of the book, which we recommend viewing if you're interested in learning more. You can get to the review here. From the Polygon review: You can also purchase the book from Amazon by clicking here. Disclosure: Links to the book on Amazon are GameDev.net affiliate links. You are supporting GameDev.net if you purchase the book through these links.
  17. Good day to everyone. I came to this forum in order to survey game developer since personally I don't know any game developer in my area. Those who are willing or interested to participate in my simple survey, please leave a comment and I will message you the survey using Google Forms. P.S. I'm not sure if I'm in the right forum so forgive me if I am. EDIT: I'll just post the link here so that I can gather responses ASAP and it will be less hassle for you guys https://goo.gl/forms/k5Nb5lJhm5kABbzd2
  18. Join: Weekly Game Jam

    Yo. Looking for a regular game jam? Join us at the Weekly Game Jam. What is the Weekly Game Jam? The Weekly Game Jam is a weekly game-making challenge. Make a game or prototype in a week - stress free. Whether you decide to jam with friends or go rogue, remember to have fun. Use the weekly theme as inspiration and start building ( WGJ website ) Step 1 Join the next Itch.io event: https://weeklygamejam.itch.io/ Step 2 Join our discord community: https://discord.gg/dUs8tn Step 3 Follow us on Twitter ( #WeeklyGameJam ) and we'll love you forever: https://twitter.com/WeeklyGameJam Games from Week 7 Why do game jams? Creating game projects and joining jams are one of the best ways to flex your game dev skills in any area of discipline - art, game design, programming, audio and so on. Whether you're currently enrolled in formal studies, or embarking on your own personal learning adventure, game jams are key. You get the opportunity to learn from other devs whether you're jamming solo or in a group. It's also a great way to 'network' without 'networking' if that makes any sense - you just meet people and participate in a common activity basically. Both beginners and experts participate in jams and everyone learns from everyone. For Weekly Game Jam, we have a mix of beginners and vets. The jam is organized by two experienced, industry game devs - Torri an artist from Lumos Labs in San Francisco and Camiile a programmer from 2K in Czech & Marin - who love to jam and play games. As a last note, you don't have to participate in the weekly jam every week, but if you feel motivated and inspired feel free. Participate at your own pace! Our Discord community is where we participate in live conversations and activities: https://discord.gg/dUs8tn What Tools can I use? Make a card game, a computer game, anything playable. If you're a beginner, you have a lot of options to explore. If you're a seasoned game dev, this is an opportunity to experiment with different tools. Here are some popular game-making tools: General Game Engines Unity | GameMaker | Godot | Scirra Construct2 Text Adventure Twine | Quest Pixel Art GraphicsGale Visual Prototyping inVisionApp Card Game Dulst | BoardGameGeek.com Comment if you decide to join! Can't wait to see you there ;D
  19. Hey Game Dev community! Firstly I am both excited and eager to get involved in the community. My name is Dany and I am currently in my final trimester of my Bachelor of Music at The College Of The Arts in Melbourne, Australia and I have been assigned the task of finding work placement (60 Hour Internship). As a long time gamer and composer I have decided to try to find appropriate placement with Independent game developers in order to have the opportunity to compose music for new games. What we will do: My collaborator (Jesse) and I will compose music suited for your existing or upcoming titles, you can choose to use the scores as placeholder music or for the release of your titles if you see it fit. As this is an internship we will not be asking for payment for the licensing of the works. Our placement requirement is 60 hours of work, however we are both very passionate about scoring and would see the projects out to the end if this means working for more than 60hrs. Examples of what we could do: - Menu Music - Cinematic Sequence Music - Short pieces for quick panels such as Victory, Defeat, Challenge menu’s etc. - Music for different areas of the game eg. Town, Wilderness, Dungeons, Forrest’s etc - Trailer Music What we need from you: You will be required to fill out a Industry Placement agreement in order for the Placement to fit the Universities guidelines. You will need to provide us with material that we can score music to. We are not limited to working with one developer so if we are unable to fulfil our 60 hour requirement with one developer we can do work for a few different teams. Demo Reel: Below is a link to a compilation of some of our previous work. https://soundcloud.com/kaempfer/composition-demo-reel I look forward to hearing from everyone and anyone who could help us on our journey. Kind Thanks, Dany & Jesse
  20. Hello. I'm seeing this sort of questions are asked frequently here but here we go. I'm interested in a career of game development but I'm not sure what way would be wise to choose. Eventually I want to work in a studio designing games. I haven't attended any university education. 30 year old and living in italy. I see there are some bachelor programs for game design. Also there are bachelor degrees for computer sciences. And there's web education. Considering these programs are in public universities, these are what i can afford. A degree would take at least take 3 years to complete, not my first choice. I understand that it's best to learn a language. Does this mean learning any language (easiest one) and then working from there is an idea? I do not have almost any coding skills. I have done some 3d modeling in the past but still. What would be your advice for beginning?
  21. Mobile technology and devices have seen great transformation. For over a decade, the use of mobile devices by man has advanced. Other than communication, mobile devices play huge roles in solving our daily problems. Today, their use extends across many fields. In education, business, health and governance etc., they are in use. Emergence of mobile apps has driven massive transformation in mobile technology and devices. They are part of our everyday life. More than before, they have become solution providers to some of man’s problems. Solving many problems for man other than communication. The use of mobile apps has grown. Mobile devices have become powerful mathematical devices. App developers and mobile apps developers design apps for education, health, and business. In education, mobile apps help students explore many educational problems. There are mobile apps to handle educational tasks like measurements, history, and accounting. Students use these apps to solve math, science, geometry, statistics and language problems. The right mathematical mobile app takes away the headache of complex calculations.. Students on the go can learn and keep tab with their academics. The truth is these downloadable mobile apps are the turning point in mobile learning. Thanks to mobile technology and top mobile app development companies. On daily basis, mobile app developers release Mathematical apps. It is possible that many apps exist for each topic in mathematics. Top app development companies work to meet growing demands for mathematical mobile apps. In the classrooms and at home, students use these apps to learn and solve mathematics. These apps can help users to practice and build their mathematical skills. They help improve the mathematical fluency of users with time. In as much as they are for learning purposes, they also provide fun and entertainment. We have put together a list of mathematical mobile apps for use in learning and solving math. Math Ref is another great math mobile app. It is available to users of Android and Apple mobile devices. This is a reference app for math formulas. User can check more than 1400 math formula on this app. This app covers math formulas on topics like trigonometry, calculus, algebra. Besides, it provides formulas in chemistry and physics. There is a unit converter and calculator on this app. It costs $2.99 for download. Math Workout is a mobile app that works only on Android mobile devices. It provides students one question per day to test their mental mathematical ability. This app ensures that student develop their mental arithmetic from its mathematical drills. It provides charts to track the progress of its users. Falling Math is compatible only on Android mobile devices. This is an easy mobile game that enhances the mathematical skills of its users. Its users only need to click the correct answer from a falling list of answers on the mobile device screen. It requires its users to be fast in calculating their answers. This is the only approach to meet up with the fast falling answers. This app is more than a game because it helps improve the mathematical skills of its users. PCalc Lite is a free math mobile app available to users of Apple mobile devices. This app is a lithe scientific calculator with great features. This app covers many mathematical operations with variety of work to do. This app can solve operations like trigonometry, unit conversion, and logarithm. There are many add-on features in this app. More features are available for buy by users seeking for more powerful calculator. A complete version of this app costs $9.99. Operation Math is a math mobile app for both Android and Apple mobile devices. For Android device users, it cost $1.99 whereas for Apple device users it costs $2.99. This app focuses on all arithmetic operations. It transforms users into spies travelling around the world to solve math problems. It is available to both kids and adults. Kids who want to learn math can use this app to do so. Mathway is available to both Android and Apple mobile device users. It is free for downloads but cost $19.99 for monthly subscription. It is a math learning app that allows users plug in questions into the app. For every given mathematical operation, this app provides users with step-by-by solutions. Users can either type the mathematical problem into the app or use their device camera to do so. This app covers several topics like calculus, statistics, and algebra. This is a useful study aid to students and will help haters of math develop interest in the subject. Number Frames is available to users of Apple mobile devices. This mobile app provides users with powerful interactive resources and math tools. It aim is to help students improve on their math skills through repeated practice. This is an app where users explore the association between numbers. Associations between math operations in this app are possible through virtual manipulation. This app is for kids and helps build their foundation in math. Einstein Math Academy is an app available to users of Android and Apple devices. This mobile app provide all irrespective of age with edutainment. On this app, adults and children alike can learn and practice math. This is a game app where users find math equations that work. There are four game modes on this app, kids, timeless, quick, and survival. This app requires student to be very good in math due to its complex scoring system. This app is available for free download and helps its users to improve their math skills. Mathspace is an app whose aim is to replace physical math texts. It is available to users of Android and Apple mobile devices. This mobile app helps provide digital math textbooks to teachers and students. It provides a platform of interactive modules on a various mathematical topics. There are more than 20,000 interactive math problems on this app. Users hand-written solve these problems indicating step-by-step solutions. There is a learning engine on the app to provide precise feedbacks for solutions. This app provides video lessons and a platform for teachers’ feedback to students. This app can solve operations on trigonometry, geometry, statistics, graphing, and probability. Premium subscription is between $7.99 per week to $79.99 per year. It supports the mathematical curriculum of Australian, United Kingdom, and United States. Wolfram Alpha is a mobile app available to users of Android and Apple mobile devices. It covers a variety of subjects including math. This app performs math operations involving numbers, algebra, graphical equations, and statistics. This app does not only solve math but provides graphic representations of solutions. It also provides formula details and explanation on given solutions. Math operations are intimidating but with the right mobile apps, solutions are available. App developers, mobile app developers, and top app development companies will meet demands. These apps will help users to have new perspective of math. Get up and acquaint yourself with these apps that make math operations as easy as possible. Besides, there are many math mobile apps available to man. Our discussion covers only a few of them.
  22. I think shouldn't be far from true to say that often beginners feel lost and don't know the best way to improve their skills, especially if they are self-thaught in wathever they are learning, being it 2D, 3D, Programming or wathever. There could be many obstacles and pitfall to learning, it could be that since one is begginner he/she doesn't realize that the scope of his project is just too big, or maybe one can't come up with a good story/gameplay for his life so lack the motivation to even attempt doing anyting on his own, and maybe one is stuck in a situation where would like to have the story/gameplay aspect figured out by someone better at it (by joining a team) but lack the technical skill to join said team and has an hard time gaining said skill because is not in a team to begin with. So I thought, something that can help beginners grow faster is something I saw in other communities around the web, which is friendly competitions. The ones I know of are mostly 2D-3D related, for instance polycount.com "Bi-Monthly CHARACTER ART Challenge" and "Monthly Environment Art Challenge", or conceptart.org "Character of the Week", "Creature of the Week", "Environment of the Week". Of course there are many more of this challenges I would like to see come into existence related to programming and game engines, for instance challenges in making certain games (see usual tetris/pong but also something more unique and specific, given some guidelines) and challenges like "Create a Water shader in Unreal Engine", or "Create a water ripple particle effect" and so on. The cool thing about this is that begginner could compare each other works (professional hopefully join in the challenge as well) and see how the best resoult where obtained, with everyone focusing/researching on the same task and learning from the best examples. This stuff is not far from something like school exercise from my point of view, therefore something invaluable for self-taught beginners who are at higher risk of getting lost by lack of direction. And here's gamedev.net twist on the subject, by joining and completing the current challenges one would get "achievments" or "medals" that are visible in his profile and under his avatar, as a cool way to improve his rep and keep the community active This is the kind of place I would like to see, where one join, check the current challenges list and decide to join in and learn something new or improve on the subject during that day/week. Also often I open the forum and there are no new topic that need to be replied, therefore this would keep us all busy in the free time Of course, maybe this sounds fun on digital paper but could end up not working, I have no idea if this stuff can work smoothly on sites that have less than a certain treshold of traffic, and it also require the time from someone actively creating this challenges content. Well anyway, I think it is worth thinking about it, let me know what do you think
  23. good program to practice with?

    hi, im new to overall game design, and was wondering if you guys have any suggestions for good, cheap programs to practice basic design on?
  24. Sorry about the rant, this is important to me; I could lose my job because of this person. My colleague can only do his work with software he is familiar with, it's like he never learned the fundamentals of what he is doing. At the start I allowed him to use what software he knew while passively trying to teach him. It worked, slowly we where making progress then suddenly our project deadline got cut by almost a year. I am now actively trying to teach my colleague, now that it's clear that I am teaching him he is being stubborn. Several times we got into arguments with the last one ending with me shaking with fury. When I explain things to him it's like he doesn't believe me. A few times now he has shown me Youtube videos where the youtuber does things differently, then states that I am wrong and the youtuber is correct. I would have been fine with that if the Youtube videos he keeps finding, weren't the instruction kind, you know the "Do X and Y" videos where they show how to do a thing but don't explain why there doing it. He sits with the tutorial open next to him all the time and because what he is doing isn't the same as in the video he quickly gets stuck. I tried showing him with his own work what to do, then he started asking me how to do things that he could already do so that I would do it for him. I tried showing him on my work, even when he can see it's working it's like he doesn't believe that I am doing things right. Often he would say a youtuber did X and Y. When I explain it's the same he just gives me a blank look. I have tried giving him better Youtube videos, he even watched a few of them yet he still can't do the basics. He keeps going back to the instruction kind of tutorials. I tried explaining how the software he knows is the same as the new ones. He literally told me the way substance's multiply isn't the same as Photoshop's, when I told him it's a mathematical expression and he could use his calculator to test it, he just gave me that blank look. In our last argument it became clear that my age is a large factor and the main reason he does not trust me, he feels that because he with more experience than me doesn't know how to do a thing, then there should be no way that someone with less experience could know how to do it.
  25. Educate En Masse: Gamifying The Process

    When I Was Your Age... Video games have been part of education since the beginning. When Spacewar! was developed in 1962 for the PDP-1 at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), a new era of entertainment was born. In the 55 years since, countless educational games, the creation of Serious Games, and so much more has happened. Growing up in the 1990s, I was bombarded with mounds of games, between Humongous Games, Nintendo edutainment titles, the Carmen Sandiego series, and so many more that it’d take a separate article just to list them alone. Additionally, if you can get through this article without getting the “Where in the World is Carmen Sandiego?” television show theme stuck in your head, you might not have lived through the 1990s yourself. But, I digress. By that point, educational titles were in full supply and we were put on full blast. Students lined up at computers for these video games to learn from Reader Rabbit, Mavis Beacon, and Pajama Sam. The holy grail was getting to play The Oregon Trail, a game where players had to make it on the Oregon Trail itself, utilizing resources given, without dying. Looking back, it was a 20 year old educational game from 1974 that kids clamored to play even then. Delve into the Past to Learn the Future! History has shown games and “edutainment” titles even in 1967, with a software title named Logo Programming, which taught the programming language Logo as an early example of a serious game. The late 1970s and 1980s saw a boom of new titles due to the ease of use of the new Personal Computers, like the TRS-80 and Commodore 64. Though, Lemonade Stand is the seemingly sole heir to the popular 1970’s educational titles for the Apple II. Atari even got an early chance to jump in with Math Gran Prix in 1982. Nintendo jumped onto the bandwagon, pushing their educational Mario-themed games. These commonly known titles included Mario Is Missing!, Mario’s Time Machine, Mario Paint, and Mario Teaches Typing. But, Nintendo started even before those with Donkey Kong Jr. Math (Japan 1983, North America 1986). In the modern era, Nintendo’s edutainment doesn’t seemingly focus on the concept like it used to. But, they do continue with games like the knock-out Brain Age. Unfortunately, this progression also includes tons of shovel-ware titles available for the Wii and 3DS/DS, but every so often a gem is discovered. What's the Future of Educational Games? Education will only get more diverse as the years progress. With the uprising of “Serious Games” in the past decade, doctors can learn proper techniques and skills without needing a real corpse. Police officers are trained in problem solving skills, digitally. Organizations like the Serious Games Institute (SGI), focus on applied research into the thought process of Serious Games, providing courses and education on how to properly convey the development. Training and technique are gamified across multiple vocations. Additionally, Virtual Reality is at an all-time high at the moment. Back in 2011, author Ernest Cline dreamed up a world of VR, in his novel “Ready Player One”. In a dystopian near-future, people prefer to live in the virtual world, even attending school in the aptly named OASIS. Where, this is a nearly complete science-fantasy, some truth can be found in it to hint at our future. With online and virtual schooling, professors and teachers are just an email or a webcam call away. As technology advances, so do the ideas. For instance, companies like Google and Microsoft look into their respective head-mounted displays for new ways to give entertainment, which often runs parallel with education. Immersive VR Education is working on a platform called Engage, which brings Cline’s VR classroom closer to being a reality than ever before with fully interactive lecture halls. Virtual assets and tools can help presenters teach their lesson plans, draw on the white boards, and interact with students through their Engage avatars. Engage 0.2 can already be found on Steam, Vive, and the Oculus Store. The advent of the 360-degree camera is playing a part in the process as well. Google Expeditions Pioneer Program lets students travel to far off lands they normally wouldn’t have visited, whereas Alchemy VR lets people dive into the sea and explore the Great Barrier Reef. On-The-Go To Learn Where full-on teacher replacement is not in the outlook very soon, there are so many possibilities to learn using games and gamification today. With more virtual realities on the horizon, one has to ask when the educational institutes will eventually go fully digital, or if they will at all. Or will the idea be simplified and streamlined even more? But, not all of the future of education is in virtual worlds; some can simply be found right in the palm of one’s hand. Digital mobile education is as simple as learning a new language with a slew of gamified apps available, such as Duolingo, or helping math skills with apps like Photomath. Out are the days that students have to write notes with a pencil. Note-taking in the modern era is simplistic with apps like OneNote and Evernote. TED-Ed gives a platform for more than 250,000 teachers and public speakers to do what they love. Websites like Udemy offer a mobile app to allow education and training in whatever the heart is set on completely on the go. My Avatar And I Not all games in education is embedded within the technology. Sometimes, it can be in the unlikeliest of ways. For example, school shootings over the years have put people up-in-arms about video games whenever it turns out the suspect plays them. Several here in the USA have been reported on, but in 2002, Germany had a similar situation. The Erfurt school massacre left 16 people dead at the Gutenberg-Gymnasium and because the gunman was an avid fan of first person shooters (called “ego shooters” in Germany), parents rose up against video games for a time. Fifteen years later, the situation has shifted dramatically in favor of games. In 2011, a computer gaming educational group from the University of Erfurt named “Spawnpoint” worked on a project with teenagers of all ages at the Gutenberg-Gymnasium called “My Avatar and I”. They let the students create digital avatars of their own personal identity, share screenshots, and discuss the appreciation and contribution of computer games into the modern culture. Aside from the creativity factor involved, the project helped students learn from gamification and have self-reflection on their own multimedia usage. The project won the 2011 Dieter Baacke Prize, an award given each year to educational, social, and cultural work. Since then, Spawnpoint and the University’s Erfurt Gaming Group continue to help train teachers on how to utilize games in their curriculum. They are taught that classic educational games are considered “chocolate-covered broccoli”, which refers to the idea that it may be sweet on the outside, but the second kids see the green vegetable, they will reject it. Instead, AAA games are introduced to the students to keep them engaged and teach the relevant lesson involved. The group also holds public events and presentations to advocate games as a cultural asset. To Clarify: We Must Gamify! In conclusion, video games, gamification, and utilization of digital tech is the future of education, training, and culture itself. The quicker we, as society, embrace this concept, the sooner we can move forward to make education easier to those that want to learn.