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Found 272 results

  1. Hello everyone! I finally mustered the balls to come here and ask for your advice. To simply put it, my friend and I would like to emulate, or make a small private server of, this pretty old MMO. We've managed to obtain the database of said MMO, even though it's not the most recent version. The issue is.. both of us are what you'd call non-programmers, so we have no idea where we should start. Having the database we've used SQL Server to take a look at it, but that's as far as we go. He says we need somone who's familiar with c# & sql programming languages to help us set this up, skills that none of us have. All we want is to put a small server up and running so that the two of us and a couple other friends can play together, kind of like minecraft. We'd like to find people to help us set this up, or to at least guide us on what we have to do so we can hire some programmers. So I'd like to ask: Since we have the database and (I think) don't need reverse engineering, what are the next steps to make it work and have the server go live? What are the programms that we need to use for said steps? What kind of skills should we look for in the people we'd hire to set the server up? I'm sorry if this sounds halfassed but I really appreciate any advice you'd have to offer. Thank you in advance!
  2. This article was originally posted on LocalizeDirect's blog Ever thought about expanding your game to the MENA region but not sure where to start? Try Turkey first. It’s very much a mix of East and West, it is also the most developed games market and the video game centre of MENA. Previously Turkey attracted mostly Asian publishers, now, Western companies include it in their expansion plans too. KEY TAKEAWAYS: Turkey is the most developed games market in MENA and #18 in the world. Console and PC games generate slightly more revenue than mobile games. Localization to Turkey requires human input and QA due to numerous suffixes as strings with placeholders should be completely paraphrased (and, surprise, machines are still bad at doing that). What’s covered? Turks are fond of games. Why? We have a few interesting numbers Who is targeting Turkey? The most popular game genres Why are successful games in Turkey all localized? 9 best game localization approaches for the Turkish market How to make a foreign game #1 in Turkey Turkey is a 30 million strong gamers market, full of young gamers (this is more than the total population of many European countries!) Last year, Turkish gamers generated over $850 million in game revenue. This translated into the ranking they occupied in the top 20 most lucrative games markers globally. In 2019, Turkish online games revenues are predicted to grow at 8%, and mobile games are expected to bring 9% more revenue than in 2018. Image source Fun fact: Turkish gamers spend 70% of their time on PC, ranking 3rd after only Poland and Russia. In 2018, PC/Console games generated more revenue than mobile games. Why so? #1 Internet cafes. There are more than 20,000 cyber cafes in Turkey which are visited by 7.5 million gamers every month. This means that even those players who do not have cutting-edge technology at home, can still play complex video games elsewhere. #2 Over the last year, computer games became more affordable due to the numerous promotions on digital gaming platforms like Steam. No wonder Turkey has been called “the video game centre of the MENA region”. Some game brands that target Turkey Thanks to mobile gaming, the gamer user base grew considerably in just a few years. There are 50 million smartphone users in the country, and after the arrival of the popular “Angry Birds,” “Candy Crush” and “Fruit Ninja” games, more and more people started playing mobile games. In 2018, the popularity of video games, PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds and Fortnite, boosted the interest in both mobile and online games. Nintendo re-entered Turkey with the Nintendo Switch in 2018 after an absence of many years. Epic Games, Riot Games, Zynga, Netmarble and a number of other game brands have Turkey in their portfolios. What are the most popular game genres in Turkey? According to Gaming in Turkey , Turkish gamers prefer MOBA, strategy, RPG, casual, and esports game genres. Many were attracted by the “Grand Theft Auto” series and easily turned into fans afterwards. If you developed a mobile board game, definitely localize it into Turkish - almost half of all mobile sessions are related to this game genre. Image source Turkish gamers prefer free-to-play games, based on the “micro-transaction” model, when gamers play for free but pay to upgrade their accounts. Competition is an important part of gaming habits too: Turkish gamers love features like “player versus player”. Also, the content and game rules should be accessible and easy to learn. Successful games in Turkey are all localized 80% of the Turkish population don’t speak any other language but Turkish. This means - game localization is a must if you want to win over your target gaming audience. Localizing your game into the Turkish market is easier than into any of the Arabic-speaking countries. Unlike right-to-left Arabic, Turkey in written from left to right which makes it easier from the perspective of UI/UX design. However, there are some Turkish-specific characters. For instance, there are 4 i’s in the Turkish language: dotted and dotless. While the uppercase for ‘i’ in English is I, in Turkish it’s dotted İ. Some Latin characters aren’t used at all. Best game localization practices for the Turkish market Follow the recommendations of our Turkish translators on what to pay attention to in your translation process to ensure top-notch localization, whether it’s a mobile, PC or console game. #1 - Mind language length Cagdas Mandali: “In Turkish, there are many verbs that are made of one noun and one auxiliary verb. Such as, “Accept” is a noun in Turkish when translated alone (Kabul). You make it a verb by adding an auxiliary verb, and it has to become “Kabul Et”. This applies to many other buttons, such as deposit, withdraw, help, continue… The list is long.” #2 - Take suffixes seriously in the placeholders Turkish is the language of suffixes. And if in the regular translations the linguists can customize it accordingly, when it comes to the text with placeholders, it’s a real challenge for translators. Cagdas Mandali: “Say, our text is “Send Energy to {player_name}“. It is clear that the placeholder will be replaced by another player’s name. But, in Turkish, any name will have a different suffix. Depending on the letter used in the last syllable, the suffixes are conjugated as a back vowel or a front vowel. Then, we have an issue of blending letters. “To Rodrigo” is translated as “Rodrigo’ya”, and “To Elly” is translated as “Elly’ye”. “Michael’s” is translated as “Michael’ın” while “Slava’s” is translated as “Slava’nın” (extra “n” is added when the name ends with a vowel). Since there is no legit way of finding a one size fits all translation, we localize it as “Send Energy to the player whose name is {player_name}” or “X that belongs to the player named {player_name}“. Unfortunately, the only solution is to define different placeholder suffixes and also placeholders for last syllables of all nouns, which is almost impossible as long as clients send us only unified placeholder texts.” #3 - Link your game to the local culture References to the local celebrities and jokes will be appreciated although don’t overdo culturalization. If gamers are playing a game featuring Italian mafia, no need to turn it into Turkish gangsters. Collaboration with local celebrities can be also useful. When localizing its F2P title “League of Legends”, Riot Games hired Turkish celebrities as voice actors. It paid off: the game became super popular and attracted thousands Turkish gamers to the Internet cafes to play LoL. #4 - Adjust formatting to the Turkish locale If your original game was developed in the US or for the US audience, change dates, time, decimal separators, currency. Remember The Witcher 3 by CD Projekt that took the hit by localizing the price? Some basic rules: a) Date format: DD.MM.YYYY Example: 17.12.2020 for 12.17.2020 in the US b) Time format: HH:MM[:SS] Ex: 20:00 for 08:00 pm, and 08:00 for 08:00 am c) Numeric format: 999.999,99 with comma as decimal separator and period as a grouping character. Currency symbol positioned after number. Example: 123.455,25₺ vs $123,455.25 Ali Yucel: “We put the percentage sign before the number rather than after it. We don’t use single quotation marks unless it’s a quote within a quote. And our rules for using commas are quite different from that of English.” #5 - Allow mistakes and international words if needed In some cases, the street version of the language would be preferred over the academic one. Plus, many international words became an indispensable part of Turkish daily vocabulary. So to say, there is no need to translate sushi as the “Japanese raw fish dish” - sushi is sushi, full stop. Cagdas Mandali: “One game that I localized features kids - uneducated, rude, swearing all the time. I translated their dialogues in the same manner as Turkish street kids would talk, without attention to grammar, misspelling some words. However, the developers decided to go with the “proofed and corrected” version of the text where those kids were talking like ladies and barons. Luckily, after the texts went online, the developers consulted a 3rd party, and decided to change the already live texts for the “street version.” #6 - Evaluate your in-game content for the sensitive element Religion (Islam) can become a sensitive issue, but there’s always a work-around. Casino games are banned in Turkey although no other games with microtransactions or in-game purchases are at risk. As in many other countries, ultra violent games or those that “undermine” Islam find themselves on shaky ground, especially if they target a young audience. #7 - Translate tutorials and guidelines Turks have trouble finding tutorials or walkthroughs in Turkish. If they don’t understand sophisticated games such as World of Warcraft, they quit. League of Legends gained a lot of popularity after it was localized into Turkish and it still has a HUGE community in Turkey (over 13 million active accounts). Ali Yucel: “To give an example, even at the height of WoW, all non-English speaking Turkish gamers preferred Knight Online over it, because it was very simple, and it didn’t require much knowledge of English. It was simply a hack and slash MMO. Yet, there were thousands of Turkish websites, forums and blogs dedicated to Knight Online.” #8 - QA game after localization Allow Turkish translators and native-speaking testers to PLAY the game to spot any inconsistencies and errors. Usually, professional game translation services have proofreading as part of their localization process, without LQA, they track grammar mistakes rather than language-related issues. Ali Yucel: “Many publishers/developers will pay for the QA of the translations, but not for actually playing the game and making note of the issues there. Professional publishers pay for at least 5 hours of play time, with developer access, and that solves a lot of problems. Sometimes, even the same sentences/expressions will need to be translated differently depending on the context. You cannot always catch that by simply looking at the Excel or MemoQ screen. At least that’s the case in Turkish.” Game localization costs into Turkish start from $0.15/word while Turkish game testing - at €30/hour. #9 - Translate ads and marketing materials Ali Yucel: “I keep seeing Instagram and Facebook ads that were translated very badly. That’s a huge turn off. Even a single line can make a bad impression. It has to sound right, and that’s impossible with literal translation.” How to market your game in Turkey? Now, after you’ve localized your in- and out-game text, how are you going to promote it? As games are entertainment products, they should be marketed like movies or concerts. You’ll need a media plan and, probably, cooperation with a local marketing agency. Influencer marketing, Google and Facebook ads are key if you want to get installs and reach a younger audience. Traditional media can be of use too. For instance, to promote its game Paramanya/Travelling Millionaire - a fully localized version of Modoo Marble, South Korean mobile game company Netmarble shared a fake news story about a mysterious man spreading money all around Istanbul, and involved fake anchors to report on it. Screenshot of one of the fake reports. Source: Youtube The campaign went viral and even made its way to a popular TV show when the truth was revealed. As a result, Paramanya became the top grossing game in Turkey (and later in Saudi Arabia). Make Turkish gamers discover your game now and book your spot at the top of the MENA region. Contact us to discuss Turkish localization services, your title potential or play with the game translation tool to get the quote estimates for MENA localization.
  3. It's 1993 and you play as a deranged LAPD detective whose colleague got murdered. Get revenge by slaughtering half of the underworld in this retro, ultra-violent, side-scrolling shooter. Aggression and speed are the only elements that will keep you alive. Variety of weapons and an amazing synthwave & vaporwave soundtrack are there to help you. Features: - Tons of blood - Story - 10 challenging levels, 3 bosses - 20 weapons, each weapon can be used to execute an enemy - Synthwave, vaporwave and dark ambient soundtrack by Catsystem Corp, Daniel Deluxe, Lazerpunk, Ugasanie, and Xerxes the Dark - Retro visuals Gameplay tips: - Combos and executions heal you up - Get 5 stars on a level to increase your max health - Melee weapons are most efficient against enemies with guns and vice versa - Plan all your moves ahead - Nearby enemies can hear your gunshots - Use shotguns at close range - Shotguns can destroy doors Controls: - A, D - Move left/right - W - Use stairs - Left mouse button - Attack - Right mouse button - Pick up/throw a weapon - Space - Execute an enemy DOWNLOAD, SCREENSHOTS, MORE INFO: https://viicty.itch.io/onduty
  4. If you haven't heard about Breakout: The Dark Prison by now, then you've most likely been living the life of a recluse. In short, Breakout: The Dark Prison is the AAA game that comes to Android/iOS this summer. Truthfully, the mobile market has been crying out for a spectacular, stand-out action adventure. Thankfully, Breakout: The Dark Prison fits that mold in all but every sense. Breakout: The Dark Prison pushes the processing power of current systems with its visual excellence. All the while, impressing with deeply-layered RPG mechanics. Aside from the obvious, why does Breakout: The Dark Prison look so amazing? Well, there's a plethora of reasons why this summer sensation is grabbing all the headlines. Why Breakout: The Dark Prison Looks Amazing With so many games primed for release this summer, what makes Breakout: The Dark Prison so unique? Maybe, it's the movie-like cinematics? Or rather, its poignant survival story, that stirs the soul, and touches the heart? As exciting as it is unpredictable. Could the reason be stunning graphics that raise the bar to unprecedented heights? Whatever the cause, and there are many, Breakout: The Dark Prison is an upcoming sensation, and the summertime smash-hit, you can't afford to miss. Breakout: The Dark Prison, Gripping Gameplay Concerning gameplay, Breakout; The Dark Prison is in a class of its own. More importantly, its densely integrated systems provide vast depth and immense replay value. Whether you're running the gauntlet and taking part in epic PVP duels, or crushing brutal bosses throughout the campaign, there's something here for everyone. These elements are made even more enjoyable, by a rock-solid combat system, which is both beautifully balanced and richly rewarding. Add to that an extensive player creator-system, alongside an innovative crafting mechanic and a host of side quests to prop-up the primary story mode. The result is a ground-breaking RPG, set to be the ultimate AAA game coming to Android/iOS this summer. Stand-out Features of Breakout: The Dark Prison Visually, Breakout: The Dark Prison is leaps and bounds ahead of its peers. Especially, considering its an Android/iOS game. Not only do the environments look pristine, but the cutscenes appear polished throughout. All of which infuse gameplay and story sections seamlessly. Also, NPC's share voiced dialogue which is both convincing and compelling. Another breakthrough feature for the mobile market. We haven't even discussed player progression yet, which is perhaps the most exquisite quality to Breakout: The Dark Prison. Players use XP obtained through level completion, or from killing enemies. Then, these morph into ability points which assign to any of the main attributes. Better still, each skill reflects the class chosen at the start of the game. Whether you prefer the combat ability or the shooting ability, stats will modify accordingly, based on your choice of class. All in all, it’s this depth of player freedom that makes Breakout: The Dark Prison the must-play Android/iOS game this summer. The Team Responsible for The Games Development The driving force behind the project, and the passionate minds making this virtual dream a reality is Latersoft. That said, the game couldn't be in more capable hands. Developed by a seasoned team of over 30 experienced professionals, a handful of which have spent ten years or more perfecting animation & 3D modeling, already two years into its creation, there's little wonder that Breakout: The Dark Prison looks destined for greatness. Finally, Breakout: The Dark Prison comes out this summer, so be sure to pick up your piece of gaming history! What a summer we have in store. In truth, there hasn't been a game with this level of hype attached for some time. All in all, we can't wait to get our hands on the AAA game that comes to Android/iOS this summer. If only we could speed up time. Thankfully, we can bank on Breakout: The Dark Prison being an instant classic. Bring on the summer. It can’t come soon enough. *** UPDATE - 17/SEP/2019 *** Now it is ready for pre-registration on Google Play!
  5. Presenting Bunninja Bunninja is set in a subterranean world where animals have built their society. One day, for a mysterious reason, everything starts to collapse and demons rise from the depths below. As one of the last ninjas, you must set out to explore this big kingdom to find the truth and save the world. But it won't be easy: not only will you have to face countless demons, but also some fellow animals that will cross your path aswell! The game is pretty much a roguelite (permanent death!, upgrades...), but there are no "levels": it's just a big open-world of interconnected zones. There are villages and houses that are hand-made, always at the same place, but the zones that connect them are procedurally generated. There will also be bosses, sidequests, and wide variety of interesting weapons and items, giving the game a high replay value in spite of its lack of progress. There's also a multiplayer option I'm making. For now it's just more bunnies in a different colour but I'm thinking about having other animals unlockable by doing sidequests, which would be the only unlockable thing in the game. And maybe each character would have a special ability. (I'm calling it "Bunninja" for now but I'm looking for a better name. Open to suggestions!) Links Join the discord server! discord.gg/WMvFamW Follow me on Twitter
  6. I have idea for a video game it call pirate hidden war conquest you play as timid and mischief boy or girl who on vacation with his or her family on the beach and you were put in charge watching the basket fill with food while the rest the family look for a until a bunch of sumo sponge squids are eating the food and you chase after them for hours and next thing you know you were lost a desert island found mystery pirate chest fill with pirate captain outfit along with a awesome pirate sword and amazing machine call the fusion weapon maker and pirate ship on that day that boy or girl became a pirate king or queen of the seven seas along with islanders and animals to every wish as he or her crew.
  7. I fail to find the youtube video where they (author and commenters) about "Game Designers" who are in reality "Story Tellers". Puzzles for my intellect, racing for adrenalin. The combination (super mario): fun. I stopped playing story based games after monkey island II because of the disapointing ending. Also I do not watch Lost or GoT. So what puzzles do you think about? I never understood star craft: It is like real life, thousands way to success, not the single solution. It is not like math. It is not fun. Animals, so you are an Artist? Links to a gallery? Mario has cute animals. Better than candies. It sets candy crush apart, but after 30 minutes watching it, I get sick in the stomache 😉
  8. Project Name: Rise of the Betrayer Program/Language: Game Maker Studio 2 using GML Current status: All Tilework is done, Demo is near completion with Enemys, Bosses, Weather, Day/Night Website and video devlogs: Blastedrealm.com Roles Required: [Programmer, Pixel Artist, Social Media Manager,] Programmers This position is looking for a GameMaker Language developer in GMS2. We are looking for people who know how to compose and create logical modular polished scripts and can generally work with others please apply using the link below. Pixel Artist We currently have the majority of the Parallax and Tilework all ready. Will need to help with some other miscellaneous needs for the game such as UI, Bosses, Puzzles or more All artwork is 32x32 based. Social Media Manager For this position we are looking for someone who knows how to advertise a game. Posts would be to our Website and Social Media platforms. Knowledge or some experience of the position would be helpful but not required. Recruiting New Members Form https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1ArnSD8poXTu9wmjacM8ItfDDKM960uOfN-iyCnsVMsc/viewform?edit_requested=true Genres: MetroidVania/Puzzle/2D Platformer Description: Rise of the Betray is an Action-Adventure game. The game will feature decision-making, crafting, fast-paced combat, multiple endings, intricate story-telling, an open world to explore, and more! Rise of the Betrayer will pose a dark atmosphere at times, filled with drama, mystery, and dread. The game will feature hard-core level of difficulty when it comes to platforming, combat, puzzles, and decision-making.Crafting is a big part of the game, so we encourage players to use the tools they have and come up with unique ways to overcome a challenge.
  9. Thank you for your support, we just released the full game! https://store.steampowered.com/app/1026160/Misadventures_of_Laura_Silver_Chapter_I/ Pilsen, Czechoslovakia, 1935. During the interwar period, detective and gun enthusiast extraordinaire Laura Silver and her companion, former police officer Orewell Cooper, are sent to Czechoslovakia to a rather peculiar investigation. Their target? A mysterious creature lurking in the murky waters of Pilsen. After their arrival, they are ready to investigate, disguised as two journalists. However, following a suspicious death in the hotel, their plans are interrupted. Also, who is this lost child sitting out in the cold? Features >6-7 hours of gameplay. >70.000+ words. >Eight hours of total gameplay. >Over 100 decisions. >Multiple endings. >Available for Windows, Mac & Linux. https://youtu.be/nQwmuMHGpug https://youtu.be/y9lsi942JFw Please let us know what you think about our game, we appreciate every comment! Thank you! Further links: https://instagram.com/laurasilver_official/ https://laurasilverofficial.tumblr.com https://www.facebook.com/laurasilverofficial/ https://twitter.com/laurasilvergame https://atticsalt.itch.io/silver https://vndb.org/v22514 http://studioatticsalt.com/index.php/silver/
  10. Hi everyone! I'm a GMS2 programmer at King Crow Studios. I'm currently working on a game called Necroball. To give a short description of the game, it's a 2-4 competitive sports game that combines soccer and tower defense. The objective of the game is to hit the Necroball skull into the goal or spawn minions to traverse to the mausoleum to earn points. Earn 50 points to win the game. Necroball is available on Steam, but I'm rebuilding the game from the ground-up in a different game engine. Here's a link to the original Necroball: https://store.steampowered.com/app/563410/Necroball/ I made several mockups of the character select screen. The first image of the character select screen is the one from the original Necroball. The other images are our mockups for the revised game. The last image is the newest mockup and probably the one we're going to use. Our mission is to design a sharp, readable interface (i.e. typography, layout, content, coloration, etc.). Note: The controllers at the top of each archway are just stock images of an XBOX One controller used for concept purposes. We'll make a new one down the line. Any suggestions, feedback, and/or pixel art issues are appreciated!😄
  11. Hello! Guys, I'm completely new and want to learn how to create games, for example racing games Tell me where to start to learn?
  12. Hi, I'm looking people for my team to make a pixel style action puzzle game. More info if interested. The game is meant to be a challenging game. Our main programmer made this game a few days ago: https://itch.io/jam/gmtk-2019/rate/461011 Discord: allualbert#4000
  13. It’s been a long time since the previous ConnorORT Studios devblog so let’s dive right in! Our plan since the release of Towards The Pantheon has been to work on one light hearted adventure game and a darker survival horror style game. As a result we began development on Bam’s Countryside Adventure, a farming sim with magic, adventure, and fantasy elements starring Bam the cat from Towards The Pantheon, and a survival horror title Purity Of Intent. We realized that the scope of Purity of Intent would be better tackled when treating it as the only game our studio has in development. It became clear to us that we wanted to work on a darker Bam game alongside Bam’s Countryside Adventure and the result has become Bam and the Castle of Horror! Bam and the Castle of Horror also stars Bam the cat, but this is no countryside adventure! Bam receives a mysterious letter from his long lost brother Biggles which claims that he has been trapped in an abandoned castle. Bam can’t be sure whether this is true or not, but he can’t live without at least trying to save his brother and quickly rides his sled down to the castle to investigate. Upon entering the door locks behind him and he discovers that he is in for a much darker and more frightening journey then he could have ever imagined. The game is heavily inspired by classic survival horror games such as Resident Evil and Silent Hill while also not being afraid of exploring new mechanics and creating its own space in the genre. Mixing the cutesy elements of a cat sipping green tea to recover health in a safe room with the terror of him soon after being dragged by a monstrous mad man into a barrel of acid was at first odd, but Leandro and I have enjoyed merging these two seeming conflicting worlds and styles together into something new and unique. We’ve been crunching hard to get a feature complete internal demo of Bam and the Castle of Horror ready for testing. This demo will consist of an arena where Bam fights against gauntlets of enemies, similar to the Mercenaries mini games in recent Resident Evil games. Although the main campaign of Bam and the Castle of Horror is story and exploration driven we feel it’s very important to focus on the core gameplay mechanics and perfect them first before moving on with level creation and world building. With this ‘arena mode’ demo we will be able to tweak the gameplay elements, enemy AI, and overall feel and atmosphere of the game until it’s just right. Once all the gameplay elements are solidifed, we’ll also know how to best design the levels and campaign around those mechanics. This is something we’ve learned from our work on Towards The Pantheon where we worked on all of the game’s elements simultaneously as opposed to fo