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Found 16 results

  1. Introduction to the Conflict of Wisdom Conflict of wisdom is a multiplayer turn-based strategy game. In Conflict of Wisdom players conquer parts of the world by answering quiz questions correctly. Start of the game Before the game starts, players join the matchmaking queue where they will be matched with other players of similar skill. When enough players joined the queue, the game will start. Each of the players will be given a capital region which is distant at least two regions from another player capital. This region will be the only region owned by a given player at the start and used as a starting point for all the following conquest. Game mechanics 1. Conquest of the regions: Players are able to conquer only one region per turn. The region being conquered has to be a neighbor of at least one of regions owned by the given player. After starting the conquest question with four possible answers will show on screen of all players, only attacking and defending players can pick the answer. When the tile is not owned by anybody only the attacking player can pick the answer. Whoever picks the right answer wins. When the defender picks the right answer region stays owned by defender when the attacker picks the right answer region ownership is transferred to the attacker. If the region is not owned by anybody before the conquest and the attacker will not pick correct answer region stays owned by nobody. 2. Tie resolution: When both sides pick the correct answer, winner is whoever pick the answer first. 3. Lifelines: Every player will have two lifelines which could be used once a game. First one will be 50:50, which will hide 2 incorrect answers, and other will show percentages of other players choosing particular answer to the question. End of the game Every game has two possible means of ending. First one happens when there is only one player who holds all regions. Second one happens after certain number of turns when the player with the highest score wins. For more information please follow project on twitter: @WisdomConflict
  2. Cubic321

    Panda Jumper

    Hello everybody! Now I'm developing a game with a simple unobtrusive gameplay. The goal of the game is to get to the other side by jumping on platforms. Control is a single jump button, but it's not that simple. In this case, I like Nintendo's approach to its games. Where, at first glance, the simple control of the character hides a deep mechanics that the player discovers gradually. I want to implement this approach in my game. For example, if the landing immediately press jump, the character will make a combined jump with a flip. For combined jump player will earn more game points. Game points can be spent, for example, that would save the game on a special platform for this. Thus, it is profitable for the player to plan his actions. In addition, for example, if the player lands on the edge of the platform, he will lose his balance and fall, but if the landing immediately press the jump button, the player will not fall and will continue to jump. The game world too is not simple. Platforms have their own character: there are disappearing platforms,those that randomly move, move apart, etc. But more about that later. Now ready character design, platform design and entry-level background. As well as basic animation and mechanics. https://twitter.com/cubic321
  3. Dreamered

    C++ Where to begin

    Hi! I'm posting today because I'm tired of procrastinating! It's time I get stuff done so here I am attempting to do just that. Games have been a big interest to me and the idea of making a game please me greatly. I am a C++ beginner and know very basic rules about the language. The game I look to create is a top down 2D space game inspired greatly by Dark Orbit and both Space Pirates and Zombies 1&2. From previous research I've broken down my individual goals and steps. I love the combat system, and would like to get it working first. Goals for my first step: 1.) SPaZ style Shooting 2.) Dark orbit ammo change(I. E default ammo then press a button to another ammo which changes colour) 3.) Spawn enemies by an enemy base 4.) For this version have a default base. Kill the base win the game 5.) Default Human base which spawns allies and is your respawn point 6.) Ally and enemy A.I With all of this said here are my questions 1.) Is godot the right engine for this project? I have started a project where I got the ship to move but can't get it to shoot. 2.) Is my current goal list a good and realistic list to aim for as a starting point? 3.) Do you have any tutorials to recommend? 4.) How should I go about tackling this list? What order should I go in? 5.) Generally how hard is it for a developer to make a 2D Space Faction sandbox game? I notice that this genre is rather uncommon among newer games and wonder if this may be the reason. 6.) Given that I am artistically challenged I'm currently using assets, however eventually I need to get better art together. I don't know how to overcome this other than asking someone to hopefully work with me lol. Do you guys have any recommendations for this? Additional Info: I'm currently working Full Time 8:30 to 17:30/18:00. I'm on leave for 2 weeks so figure this is the best time to start. My knowledge of C++ is very limited only knowing a few functions off by heart. If I were to sit down and do something, I could probably make a cool text-based JRPG with no art or U.I. Lol so I'm not sure how experienced that is. I studied C++ in college for a year as BTEC. Barely able to pass. I had to make monopoly, but I half made it and still passed due to my brutal analysis of my code. The basic idea of the game is to have an open world 2d space game like SPaZ an D.O. Multiple factions like SPaZ 2 or Planet Side 2 with a constantly progressing and simulating map that fight over land hexs in a 4x style. Eventually I want to have MOBA style Ability-Casting as well as the ammo changing. I'd like a lot of customisation for this game so good U.I
  4. Hello all and welcome to 31st Dev Diary for Project Taival! This weeks subjects are; Starting to make a mini-game as a tutorial on Godot Engine. Preparing for gathering funding for the project. The Mini in a Game This last week has been more productive in a concrete way, than many before it. Don't get me wrong, I have done brain storming all the time in anticipation of things finally working out with the After Effects, but no luck on that front still - I wish there was some app that you could load your After effects project as is and you could render your work using your GPU with all the effects that the CINEMA 4D plugin enables in the After Effects. If you know of any, give me a holler on the comments below. I started doing this tutorial series on YouTube, which was quite efficient at explaining the basics of simple 3D rules and basic GScript coding to make the example stage function. It takes only about an hour or less to complete the whole tutorial, after which I started making a mini-game using and modifying the scripts used i the tutorial. Here is the result so far; The idea is to make a Pong style, simple ball game with a twist and after that a simple football (soccer) game. The character moves, the ball rolls, but I still need to figure out some things to make it function properly. Luckily, Godot has a comprehensive and easy to use documentation built within Godot, which helps look up different commands and methods. I still have much to learn about GScript, so hopefully it's not too difficult. Funding the Project Other than making a Patreon account, I found out that you can use this Basic Attention Token -system in your YouTube, Reddit and Twitch channels, so that people can tip you with BAT -tokens, if they like your work or would like to support your efforts. To use this system, you need to download Brave browser and register as a creator on their site. After that they will guide you through the process, as you need to verify your identity to be able to take tips in the form of BAT tokens, or you can convert all your tips straight to Euros or US Dollars. The BAT system is still on it's early stages, but it is the first step to help bring a new and better, much less invasive and more secure way to advertise and tip your favorite content creators. Brave Browser is being developed by the co-founder of the Mozilla project and creator of JavaScript, Brendan Eich. Those who decide to start using the Brave Browser regularly through my referral link, Brave will pay me 5 USD worth of BAT, which helps me, without you needing to pay anything. In turn, you can have your own referral links for you to earn more, just by using Brave browser. US customers are among the luckiest though, as just the US residents (to my knowledge) can get paid just by watching commercials on YouTube, for example or adds in general on any page. Some people have said, that by watching YouTube the whole day, they earned close to 40 USD worth of BAT tokens a day. Remember, if Cryptocurrencies are not your thing, you can have the payment in USD or EUR also. Alternatively, the Brave browser comes with a built in add blocker and script blocker, which can be easily set off permanently, if you don't like them. The Tipping functionality has been built in to the browser as well, making it a breeze to use, once set up correctly. I still intend to use Patreon as a funding channel, as it might take even longer for the BAT Tips to start flowing, as it is such a young system at this point. Which brings me to the last topic; planning my Patreon page. I have been designing my Tier graphics and names for the tier and I will most likely just describe the Tiers as precious metals, as those are universal in every major culture. I have also modeled an octagonal star, that will be part of the design. I have been thinking what could be an appropriate approach to introducing and tell something about myself. I'm still not sure, where the line with too much honesty goes, as I have already been publicly saying, that at an earlier point in my life, I have suffered from depression for a large portion of my life and open up the issue of mental health in general in my draft text quite a lot. I'm also planning to make a pledge, to donate 50% of all the income made from my games and donations that go over 2000 euros, for mental Health Research and Care, and/or Suicide prevention, as that is a topic that should be taken more seriously, as depression and anxiety disorders are getting more common around the world, and WHO estimates, that 50% of these mental problems go un-diagnosed in Europe alone. Either due to peer pressure to not slow down "or you will loose your standing on job markets", or like most of the times, people don't always know that they are depressed. Too many still thinks that depression is a myth and that the real reason is poor motivation or a weak mind, labeling depression as a hypochondria of a weak mind. If you have any suggestions on that or any other matter, please feel free to comment. I have also updated my reddit channel, as I finally created a sub-reddit for Project Taival here; https://www.reddit.com/r/ProjectTaival/ Thank you for tuning in and I'll see you on the next one! You can check out every possible mid week announcements about the project on these official channels; • YouTube • Facebook • Twitter • Discord • Reddit • Pinterest • SoundCloud • LinkedIn •
  5. I'm a designer newbie looking to team up with other fellow newbies to create an Elder Scrolls inspired RPG called Ogera: Land of Shadows. Someone who can work with either 2D or 3D graphics and knows a program called Stencyl or Godot is a plus. Info for the game - https://docs.google.com/document/d/1CoqyOfc8stg6XP-7nklOitiRg8wBRutSDy0ZeOboACQ/edit?usp=sharing Contact me through Discord at claire#2922 if you wish to help.
  6. This time I want to post something that is not related to a game I’m working on right now but to the engines I used making the last two games. Game #2 (Castle Adventure) was made with Godot and Game #3 (Tapmoji) with Defold. I mentioned on Twitter that Defold was completely new to me and I was asked by the Defold engine developers themselves what my on-boarding experience was and if I could compare the ease-of-use and the feature-set with Godot. At first I want to mention that I didn’t try every single feature in both engines. In general I don’t have much time so I focus on making 2D games as fast as possible. So I only used the features that were needed to finish these games and didn’t try everything. Maybe there are still features I don’t know very well that would be important to mention. Godot Setup I used Godot in two game jams already and I think I know this engine a bit better than Defold. I really like this engine! The reason being, it was the first engine I used where it wasn’t necessary to download additional stuff or install anything. You can just open the downloaded file and start your project. Example Projects A second big plus was the large amount of example projects that can be chosen right from the editor. The Godot community seems to be very active and this reflects in the large number of examples. GUI The GUI is very clear and intuitive in my opinon. It’s divided in 4 parts: On the left there is the file system of the project and the scene hierarchy, which contains the nodes of the current scene. The inspector is on the right where you can change properties of the currently selected node. In the main area you can switch between the scripting editor and the graphical 2D or 3D scene editor. In the bottom area you can switch between the output console, the debugger, the audio editor and the animation editor. The Godot editor Scripting Language and Editor The scripting language is GDScript, with a syntax similar to Python and some optimizations for the Godot engine. The automatic code completition in the editor is really helpful and speeds up coding really fast. Since the release of Godot 3.0 it is possible to code with C# and C++ as well. The scripting editor in Godot Docs The documentation is very detailed and includes a huge amount of tutorials. Every single feature has its own tutorial. There are not only examples provided by the community, which can be chosen at the start screen of Godot, but also there is a GitHub repository which includes a huge amount of demo projects. Features In Godot you work with scenes. There is a powerful 2D and 3D editor where you can add and edit objects very easily. It is possible to choose from a large amount of pre-defined nodes for sprites, colliders, tilemaps, lights, sounds, particles, animations, networking and many many more. A nice, big feature is the built-in editor for key-frame animations. It is possible to change every single property of a node over time. Setting up keyframe animations was very intuitive and fast for me. It saves one from writing a lot of code. Godot has a lot of features which make developing 2D games very easy. My favourites are, as already mentioned, the key-frame animation editor, and furthermore, the TileMap editor and the simple approach to create frame-based 2D animations. Desktop, Web and Mobile export The desktop build aswell as the web build are very simply done with just a few clicks. When I was making “Castle Adventure” I used Godot 3.0. I couldn’t release a web build because it ran very slow. The problem was the number of lightsources and particles that are being rendered at once. I didn’t test it with Godot 3.1 yet, but maybe the web builds are more performant now. Issues Besides this Html5 perfomance issue there was also a problem setting up particles while making “Castle Adventure”. It was not possible to let particles emit in a particular direction. I found this Github issue related to this problem. Fortunately this was fixed in Godot 3.1! I used Godot twice in game jams already and had to forcibly work with Git. Honestly at both jams the whole team was not amused about the time we wasted solving merge conflicts. The problem occured everytime when two or more people where working at the same scene and pushed their changes to the repository. The quickest solution for this problem was making as many scenes as possible and splitting the work, so everyone was working at their own scene. In my opinion there should be an easier way to call nodes of a hierarchy by code. For example in Unity one can just call GameObject.Find(“Name”) whereas in Godot you often have to call every single node in the hiearchy until you reach the node you want (get_root(). get_node(“..”). get_node(“..”). get_child() …), especially when you try to call a node from another scene. This slows down coding, since I have to look up how to reach a particular node nearly everytime. Something similar to GameObject.Find() in Godot would be very nice! Edit: Thanks to some feedback I have learned that Godot has such feature already (Node.find_node(...))! Thank you! Defold Setup Like in Godot, there is no setup for installation. You just start the application and choose your project or an example project. It’s quite similar to Godot, only there are less sample projects. But what Defold does better: The sample projects are explained like tutorials. And this was really hepful to me. Less googling, yeah! Example Projects There are not only sample projects included in the editor, but also examples in the docs, and there is a GitHub repository with demo projects. GUI The GUI is a bit simpler than in Godot, since there are less built-in features. But the main part is the same: You have your project hierarchy on the left, in the central area you can switch betwen a graphical UI editor and the scripting editor. On the right you create your gameobjects and define their properties. The design is very simple. There are no additional windows for adding components or defining project properties for example. Everything works with right-click and choosing out of a context menu. The Defold editor Scripting and Editor The scripting language here is Lua. The Editor is very simple. The automatic code completition is not as powerful as in Godot. For example it would be nice to have auto-completition when typing URLs to gameobjects, which I have to lookup everytime I need one. Also I miss popular shortcuts like Ctrl+X for deleting a whole line of code or Ctrl+C + Ctrl+V (with nothing selected) for duplicating a line. But there is an option to open files in an external editor. So it is possible to open the .script files in an editor like Sublime Text or something similar. Defold scripting editor Docs On the Website you can find Manuals, where every component is explained with an example and a couple of nice graphics. There is also a section Tutorials, which contains 9 games with source code. You can test them directly in the browser. You can choose them also as example projects when you start the Defold engine. The third big help on the Website is the section with Examples which shows some examples of main components like Animations, Particles, GUI, Debugging and Input. Everything is explained very lovely and detailed, espacially in the Manuals. But the examples are focused mainly at developing 2D games. For working with 3D environments there is provided little information. Features In Defold you have collections, which are quite similar to scenes in Godot. Collections can contain Gameobjects or other collections. Gameobjects contain components which define its visual, audible and logic representation. To access objects or components in this tree structure, you have to write the path like an url. This makes it easy to access every component out of every scriptfile. To define properties of the application you have to change values in one single file. The game.project file. Very clear and compact approach. There is also a curve editor for animations. I never used it so far, but I think it’s really helpful when making particle effects. My absolute favourite feature is the possibility to build and hot-reaload on mobile devices. On Android you just have to install an app called dmengine. It was really helpful making “Tapmoji” for Android and has accelerated the development of this game very much. Finally, like in Godot, there is also a useful debugger. Desktop, Web and mobile export And again like in Godot, all exports are possible with just a bunch of clicks. To install the exported apk on an Android device you have to install the adb tools. Issues In general there are less build-in features then in the Godot engine. It feels kind of more low-level. This was noticable when I wanted to handle input clicking on an gameobject for example. Converting screenspace to worldspace coordinates is a thing you have to do on your own in Defold. Rotating gameobjects doesn’t work as I expected and experienced in other engines as well. There is no such function like rotateBy(degrees). Having helper functions for these things would make prototyping and coding faster. Fortunatly some helper exist! But not in the editor, you have to download them. There is something called Asset-Portal. There are some examples that can be simply imported as libraries into existing projects. There is also something really powerful for the input issue I mentioned above: Defold-Input. I had two problems making “Tapmoji”, that took me a lot of time: The first one was related to random numbers. Even though I initialized the random number generator with system time, I experienced strange behaviour. I spawned emojis moving from left or right randomly. But the first few seconds after starting the app, they all spawned at the same direction. The first few values seemed to be the same, not random. I found this post, which helped me with a really strange solution: calling random() multiple times before using random numbers. I think this shouldn’t be necessary 😉 The second problem was the web build: It was very slow in comparison to the desktop build. The solution here was to uncheck the V-Sync option in the game.project file. Having this option checked, there is a delta-time issue when running the build in browsers. Maybe there should be a short hint in the docs? The last and least important issue is related to the usability. Like mentioned above, I would like to use the scripting editor like every other editor, with the proven standard shortcuts. It simply makes me code faster. My Conclusion A big plus with both engines was the large amount of example projects that can be chosen right from the editor, they can help you find your way into the engine. Godot has more examples but Defold has some projects that are structured like tutorials, which is a lot more helpful in getting to know the engine. I like Python/GDScript more than Lua. Lua is not that popular, so I had to learn Lua before working with Defold. For me, it’s not as much fun as Python (why the hell do they start counting at 1??). But of course this is my subjective opinion, not an engine issue. Now let’s get to the feature set. Godot has more build-in features than Defold. It is advantageous to create 2D games fast. But having less built-in features doesn’t make Defold a bad engine. Under the hood, Defold is a 3D engine. It keeps things more low level, since this results in a wider range of possibilities for devs. However, the Godot engine started as a tool for developing 2D games, therefore it evolved as an engine which tries to make 2D game development as simple as possible. This results in more 2D features. With both Godot and Defold, developing the very first game worked faster than I expected. You get a lot of help and useful docs and examples on both sides. But there is still a big difference: Godot is open-source and Defold is not! I’m a big fan of the open-source approach and that’s a big plus for the Godot engine. I’m sure the Defold devs have their reasons for not going open-source (maybe beacause of the collaboration with King) but as you can see at the Godot project, this open source thing works just fine! Both engines are constantly being worked on and both communities are very active and growing. The devs of both engines reacted to my twitter posts, that shows me that they take care of their communities! 😉 Especially the Defold devs were willing to help me and wanted my feedback on their engine. That’s all! That were my impressions after using both engines for only a short amount of time. There are far more things to compare to each other, but as mentioned before, I don’t have that much experience with either engine. I hope that this comparison was informative for some of you and may help someone choose a new engine. I’m looking forward to the development of the engines in the next few years! View the full article
  7. For this I've used Godot Engine and GDScript. Hello, I am working in a Map Generation project, and I am trying to come up with a Height Map generator for the hills and mountain-ranges. I'm pretty amateur when it comes to programming in general and I mostly try to make everything from zero as I don't know much about game theory or any big programming techniques, so forgive me if anything I've done is ugly or goes totally against any common sense. Up until now, I've come up with this: extends Node2D export(int) var Origin_Min export(int) var Origin_Max export(int) var Power var HeightMap = {} func _ready(): new_seed() _mountain_range() func new_seed(): randomize() var random_seed = randi() seed(random_seed) print(random_seed) func _mountain_range(): #ORIGINS PHASE - set's origin points for the mountain-ranges var OriginList = {} for origin in round(rand_range(Origin_Min, Origin_Max)): var originPointX = round(rand_range(1, 126)) var originPointY = round(rand_range(1, 126)) if OriginList.has(Vector2(originPointX, originPointY)): continue OriginList[Vector2(originPointX, originPointY)] = {"Power": round(rand_range(1, 5)), "Connected": false} HeightMap[Vector2(originPointX, originPointY)] = 3 $TileMap.set_cellv(Vector2(originPointX, originPointY), 2) #MOUNTAIN-RANGES PHASE - try to draw mountain_ranges between every origin based on their Power level for origin in OriginList: for point in OriginList: if OriginList[point].Connected: continue if round(origin.distance_to(point)) <= (OriginList[origin].Power * Power) and round(origin.distance_to(point)) != 0: var current = origin while current != point: var currentDist = round(current.distance_to(point)) var closerDist = [] var sameDist = [] for direction in dir.Directions: var step = Vector2(clamp(current.x + direction.x, 1, 126), clamp(current.y + direction.y, 1, 126)) if step == point: OriginList[origin] = {"Power": round(rand_range(2, 3)), "Connected": true} current = point break if round((step).distance_to(point)) <= currentDist: closerDist.append(step) if round((step).distance_to(point)) >= currentDist: sameDist.append(step) if round(rand_range(0, 10)) >= 3 and closerDist.size() >= 1: #70% chance of going closer current = closerDist[round(rand_range(0, clamp(closerDist.size() - 1, 0, 3)))] HeightMap[current] = round(rand_range(2, 3)) $TileMap.set_cellv(current, 2) elif sameDist.size() >= 1: #30% chance of taking a variation current = sameDist[round(rand_range(0, clamp(sameDist.size() - 1, 0, 3)))] HeightMap[current] = round(rand_range(2, 3)) $TileMap.set_cellv(current, 2) #FILL UP PHASE - fill up the rest of the map with height level 0 tiles var xCoord = 0 var yCoord = 0 for tile in 16384: if not HeightMap.has(Vector2(xCoord, yCoord)): $TileMap.set_cellv(Vector2(xCoord, yCoord), 0) xCoord += 1 if xCoord == 128: xCoord = 0 yCoord += 1 This code is divided in three parts: Set a random number of origins in random locations(excluding borders) and give these origins a power level. For each origin, check if it can "link" with each other origin based in its power level, if so, "draw" a mountain-range in between them. Draw the rest of the map. The result is this: (can have other results because of seed) I rarely have some random problems with this code, like an origin point that says that it is nor closer nor at the same distance as another origin point when they are drawing a mountain-range in between them.
  8. Hello again! it’s time for a new announcement: This month I will deal with Godot 3.0, making a Platformer/Jump’n’Run! For those who are new here: I try to create and release a new game every month, using another game engine in every project. Last month I’ve created the first game using LibGDX, which you can play here: Super Shot. Feedback and comments are welcome! This time, the idea is to create a platformer with an atmospheric dungeon setting where a knight has to find his way through different levels, collecting treasures and fighting against enemies. Since I’m a big fan of Role-Playing Games, I would like to add some RPG elements. The player will be able to choose between different kinds of swords, armour and upgrades. To keep this simple, there will not be something like an inventory or skill system, but the player will be able to choose one of two upgrades, everytime he opens a new treasure chest. I’ve already created some concept art and took a first look at Godot. After about one day of watching tutorials and getting into Godot and with just about 140 lines of code, the result looks like this: Current progress This includes a tile-based level, dynamic lights, a tile-based animation of the player and his movement, keyframe animations for the sword and the key. What is Godot 3.0? Godot is a free and open source community-driven 2D and 3D game engine, which comes with a GUI editor with many nice and intuitive features. After downloading the engine you can start directly without installing anything. It’s very easy to create scenes like the one above with just a bunch of mouse-clicks. To implement game logic it is necessery to attach script files to objects and code in a python-like language which is called GDScript. You can also use MonoDevelop and code in C#. The documentation is included in the editor, which is very helpful. A really cool feature is the possibility to download simple demo projects right from the editor, for me this was a great help when I was adding lights into the scene. Screenshot of the Godot 3.0 Editor In general Godot 3.0 provides everything a 2D and 3D game needs: Audio, physics, math, animation, input, file I/O, creating GUI, shading, networking and even AR/VR interfaces. Useful links Here are some links for more information about Godot: The Godot website and download: godotengine.org Online-Documentation: Godot-Docs Some tutorials I came across so far: GamesFromScratch on Youtube (this guy does literally everything related to game development ;)) Godot Platformer tutorial series from UmaiPixel on Youtube Defining the Gameplay Components These are the main components that are necessary for gameplay: Tilemap based levels with background and collidable tiles (done) Player movement, player death (done) Dangerous obstacles like spikes etc. (done) Enemies Combat system Collecting keys, opening treasures (done) Upgrade system (GUI for choosing new upgrade) GUI showing hitpoints and stamina Level transitions Menu Creating graphics and animations, and finding suitable sounds is also part of nearly every single point mentioned above. Hopefully I will be able to finish them by the end of month. Let’s Move On! I really like the current state and the way these things are achieved using Godot. My next step will be to start implementing the combat system and some enemies. Come back in a week or two for an update and check out my Twitter for some screenshots! Meanwhile you can try out my last game (online): Super Shot Sourcecode Of course I created a Github repository for this project, too: Godot_platformer Or simply download the project directly: Godot_platformer_update1 (zip, 715 KB)Download View the full article
  9. PhilDev

    A Game A Month #2 – Release!

    A few days ago I published my second game – Castle Adventure, A Platformer using the Godot Engine – and finally here are some news related to the development process! As you have maybe noticed, it took me more time than just one month. Since I had exams in march I decided to take another month, because I was not really satisfied with the state and didn’t have enough time to finish the game. So here it is! A simple Platformer with eight levels with a castle-like setting, where a knight has to collect coins, avoid obstacles, destroy woodboxes, fight against enemies like ghosts and skeletons, find keys and open treasure chests getting new weapons. The player has three lifes and has to restart a level when he looses them all. The goal is to get through all stages and collect as many coins as possible. Progress There are some new features since the last update: A menu, which is simply a playable stage with the title of the game at the top. Destroyable woodboxes with spreading particles Possibility to collect coins 6 new swords 3 new levels Soundeffects and background music A outro screen Summary Generally, most of the features I added were very simple to implement thanks to the Godot editor. My favourite was the animation of the enemies. For example, the movement of the skeleton is made with keyframe animations without a single line of code! The movement of the sword, the creation and the movement of the background, the lightning, all particle effects and the graphical user interface were also done simply with the help of the editor. The most of the game logic is scripted in a file attached to the player. Like the movement and behaviour of the player and the events triggered by collisions with items or enemies. Generally, thanks to GDScript, a python-like language, and the useful code completition aswell as the included docs, scripting is very easy and clear, too. One of the most time consuming features was the possibility to dynamically change the weapon of the player when a treasure chest is being opened. There are two types of swords: a short and a long one. Overall there are twelve different swords and with every sword comes a card which is shown in the pop-up window of the treasure chest. Weapons Because the most things are done fast using the GUI Editor, I could focus more on graphical stuff and made my own castle tilesets for the platforms and the background, some obstacles like spikes, a circular saw and an animated zombie-hand and the swords, using Inkscape. Sounds, by the way, are all from OpenGameArt.org. Problem: Html5 performance Exporting the project into a Windows, Linux or Html5 Application is as simple as everything else in Godot. It is done with a bunch of clicks. But wait, why there is no Html5 version on the Itch.io page of this game? The answer is simple: the Html5 version was to laggy. Every level of the game has the most time approximately five lightsources being rendered at the same time. I think this is the main performace issue. Also the particle effects are slowing down the performace, everytime they appear. There was no time left to solve this and also I still didn’t update the project to the new Godot 3.1, which was released just about two weeks ago. I’m curious if this will help. If this will be the case, I will of course update the game and maybe even upload a playable web version. Conclusion I’m happy to have finished another game but, as ususal, there are still more things I would like to add. For example more levels, a better ending scene and checkpoints where the player spawns after getting killed. Maybe I will update the game someday. As mentioned many times yet, developing a game with Godot is very easy and fast in my opinion. There was no feature I struggled with for hours. The Engine is a good choice for both, fast prototyping of game ideas, and creating nice and polished games with every feature a game needs. The best thing is, that Godot is open source and still in development! Personally, I like to code everything myself, therefore I used engines like LibGDX so far (like in my last game, SuperShot). So it was a new experience to me to mainly focus on the graphics/art and do everything else with a bunch of clicks without planning much time just for coding. Like in LibGDX (which is based on Java) it is very simple to export games for all platforms. The only drawback in comparison to LibGDX is that you cannot just simply export and distribute a jar-File, which runs on Windows and iOS, but you have to export the project as an iOS application using a computer running the iOS operating system. Because of that i’m not able to distribute an iOS version of the game. But being based on C++ Godot seems to achieve a higher performance than LibGDX, which is a big advantage. Finally, I really like Godot, and I think I will use it in the future for my private 2D game projects! Sourcecode Of course this project is open source and you can check it out on GitHub or download it here: Godot_platformer_update3 (with release builds) (zip, 37,5 MB)Download Don’t hesitate to give me some feedback on the gameplay, the graphics and the sourcecode here in the comments or on Twitter! Download the game here (itch.io). View the full article
  10. XuluSofts Games

    Mobile Physsic Maze Runner Game

    Hi I'm a young Solo game Developer Doing My third year of study in Information Technology Next Month Im releasing my first commercial Game Named Physics Maze Runner check it out : - Don't forget to subscribe for more updates
  11. Hi to all! I've created minimalistic puzzle game for Android, and need some feedback about gameplay! It's simple 2D game with unique game mechanic (I did not see exactly the same mechanic in other games, if you know similar games, please tell me) Also, i need feedback about levels difficulty. (Some levels may seem impassable at first glance) Download and strain your brains! https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=org.godotengine.projectionfree Some screenshots: